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Elephind.com contains 44,014 items from American Presbyterian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 9 February 1860

DIAL GENTLY WITH THE LITTLE ONES A little child, when asked why a certain tree grew crooked, replied: " Somebody trod upon it, I suppose, when it was little." <He who checks a child with terror, Stops its play and stills its song, Not alone commits an error, But a grievous moral wrong. Give it play, and never fear it, i Active life is no defect; Never, _neuer break its spirit; Curb it only to direct. Would you stop the flowing river, Thinking it would cease to flow? Onwaid must it flow forever} Better teach it where to go.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 9 February 1860

QAMUEL SMYTH, SEXT «?T _2!: _CALVARY. PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Prfsbv-S RNI _J HING _UNDERTAKER, IKE *_" H0US _ft NO- 1334 _CHESrHTTE STEEET, ld= _TTw_^_m_^_S _Sansom Streetbelow Broad. _gS&b _SSib?1 * _^oved - ice boX,2 with

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 9 February 1860

KEy. ji.MES il kfeLM»S; school for a limited ' _nnrn " _ber of youngladiesy 1526; Walnut Street. 'I

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Ad [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 9 February 1860

QU AKER CITY INSURANCE eOMBANY, Fbanklin Buildi ' ngsv 403, Walnnt Street, PHILADELPHIA., CAPITAL, $200,000 SURPLUS, . ' • -....' ..; y 150,000 FIRE, MARINE, and INLAND _INSURANCE. FIRE INSURANCE,-LIMITED and PERPETUAL, ON BUILDINGS AND._MERCHANDISE OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS. . ' > _^ . MARINE INSURANCE, INLAND ANt> OCEAN, ON VESSELS, FREIGHT , and P ARGO, to and _froff. all parts of the World. GEO. H. H ART, President, , E. P. ROSS, Vice President* H. R. OOGGSHALIJ, Secretary. S. H. BUTLER_^ Assistant Secretary. DIRECTORS: George H. Hart , Andrew R. Chambers, E.E;Ross,. . Charles G. Imlay_. A. C. Cattell, H. R. _Coggshali, Foster S. Perkins, J Samuel- Jones. M.D E.W. Bailey, . [.Hon. H: M. Fuller. September 15.—ly.

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Ad [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 9 February 1860

eEKTISMEN'S _IITRiriSHIirG EMPORIUM, ¦^ ' . ¦ •¦ .: I w: W. KNIGHT'S; \ ' '¦¦ ¦¦ ' ¦ _> • _= ¦ '''¦ - ¦"¦' •¦ 606 abch: street; " . "'¦ - ¦¦_'¦¦ -: Fine Shirts, Collars and Wrappers, at WH OLE SALE, BETA I L , v OR MADE TO ORDER. UNDER CLOTHING OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. New Styles of Ties, Scarfs, &c, Always on Hand. The Largest Assortment of Cent's Supurb Dressing Gowns ; WTHECITY. 7l6-feb.2.1y

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

_tTKE i jFi&jllILY parental 'aujthoritt3'alp discipline a reli-¦ ,gious-j>Vty. , We have heretofore _tfck j ln the ground that authority to govern the falsify is vested in the parent for religious ends. It )is'a distinct and peculiar power, differing entirel_^from mere instinct or natural _affectionj_.and the _investiture is constantly guarded and. solemnized bjr the mpst awful moral sanctions. The point w, mainl y wish to treat here is, the moral pbliga&jpn binding on the parent to exercise this powei(Kn the famil y for religious _" ends. The exereii S of- parental authority and government is often! viewed as an optional prerogative , always laud_^ I when judiciously put forth, but the want of it _y _(ewed rather as a weakness than a sin, rather as ' in excusable fault than a culpable offence. Wh_« t we wish to urge here is, ' that parental authority! put forth with all the wisdom ,and:discreetness _Jhe parent possesses, is just as much religious; luty,...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

JOHN CALVIN. . The Boston Becorder is giving a series of articles on John Calvin. We take the following extract from the last number: Though Calvin gave out the doctrines of the gospel in a more clear and consistent system than did the other leading reformers, he differed from them in no point of substantial importance There were some slight differences between Luther and Calvin, chiefly connected with the subject of the sacramental controversy. Both agreed in the main doctrines of the gospel—the Trinity, original sin, election, and justification by faith alone. Both ascribed " regeneration to the Holy Spirit alone. But Luther brought out these doctrines less clearly and forcibly, and left a less profound impression of them upon his branch of the church, so that succeeding generations of Lutherans fell back upon a theory more like the Arminian. Both Calvin and Luther made the imputation of the merits of Christ the ground-work of the Reformation. And yet it is a significant fact, t...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

AIT AMEEICAlff'S ACCOOTT OF THE CITY 01 JEBDO. An American pfiicer on the " Powhaftan writes tp the Boston Courier, from Jeddo, Japan, October, 8th, 1859, as follows :— "But what shall I say of this greatest and most _singular of all cities ? A volume is needed to describe it, without attempting to give its history. I have read of old Ninevfii and Babylon below the ground, and seen and handled the works of art which have been disinterred atd created so much admiration on both sides of the Atlantic; but one living Jeddo _> above the ground, is worth a hundred old fogy cities below it. I cannot give you,an idea of it, it is so unique, so unlike every thing except itself, and so impossible, as you will thipk- I have seen several places of interest arid maintained a cool head, but I was bewildered and confounded when I saw this. It is situated on the western shore of this charming gulfj twenty miles wide by twenty-four long, to which the Lake of Tiberias is nothing, excep...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

_rnmitg For the _Atnerican _Eresbyterian. LINES Written upon receiving a cane cut from the banks of the Jordan. _BV J. TKASCIS BOURNS, M. D. I take it in my trembling hanrt, Thi3 tribute from the Holy Land, A thrill lives in it—'tia the spell, The banks of Jordan's chronicle. The Jordan 1—Was it thy charm'd wave That nursed this joy for ihel Thy breath that fanned it in tbe sun; _* Thy dews it drank when day was done; Thy voice tbat spoke to all its 1 eaves, Till they sighed as when a spirit grieves Along * the drowning sea. O river! Thine the memories are, To heir such honors from afar \ But why along thy immortal shore, Broods melancholy evermore? Stern as _thy»_tld_« in^«fve«t ttme» Chilled by the mountain snows, Seemed thy rebuke from age to age, Till lo 1 from far in Divines! page, Thy glory burst again sublime,. And now the river of every clime, The Jordan onward flows. Got] speed the herald bands who bear The tidings of salvation there •, To plant the cross whereon the ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

For the American .Presbyterian EEKE, _».Y. ~ Dear "Presbyterian :—I wanted to just whisper a word in your columns about! the " good things " whieh the Lord has done for the Presbyterian Church in Pike, Few4 York. The church was organized as a Presbyterian Church, but soon lapsed into an. Independent Congregational Church, and while in this state grew constantly weaker, until its spiritual power and influence for good were nearl_^gone. But_^ about three years ago, it returned to the simple but beautiful and scriptural order of the church, by the election of a board of Elders, and uniting with the Presbytery oiGenesee. Since then, every month has witnessed an upward step in its progress. One precious revival brought over fifty to her altars, and a gentle revival influence, like the dew upon _Hermbn, has been _experifericied _mnnh of Ihfi _timfi _sinca. Onr communion sea sons have been increasingly interesting for the past two years, but probably no one has been so full of a tend...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

v THE HOME OF LUTHER. A. correspondent of the Rochester Democrat and American, writing froni Dresden, _furnished an interesting account of the home of Martin Luther, as he found it in a recent visit to Wittenberg. He tells us that the old oak tree, where the great Reformer, three hundred and forty years ago, burned the Papal bull, wUh*Sts golden seal, is still standing by the roadside, with a fence around it. His description of the old University buildings is evidently that of an enthusiastic observer. These buildings, it will be remembered, were formed out of the still more ancient Augustine Convent, where Luther lived after his marriage. His room remains unaltered, except by the hand of time. By the window are stiil preserved the two plain board seats on which Martin and his frau supped, with the broad window-sill for a table. Here, too, is still seen the three-story black stove of modelled clay, with numberless panels and curious allegorical devices, designed by old Martin ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

GOD _IJT _JTATIFBE. : lhe _liible, troin Genesis to Revelation, recognises a present God in all the operations of nature , accomplishing His all-wise purposes through the medium of natural causes , and human and spir itual agencies. "My Father worketh hitherto/' said the Saviour, "and I work.'/ Any philosophy which sets aside the providenti_^_government of God, extenSing to the minutest details as well as comprehending the most general laws, is neither wise nor Christian. Prof. Agassiz, in a recent lecture, uttered some thoughts worthy of universal notice: There is behind them, and anterior to their existence, a thought. There is a design according to which they were built, which must have been, conceived before they were called into existence j otherwise these _things could not be related in this _geqeral manner. Whenever we study the general relations of animals, we study more than the affinities of beasts. We study the manner in which it has pleased the Creator to express...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

<^M »» . — i ¦ For the American Presbyterian. NEW _AEGTJM1_UT _tfOB THE SABBATH. A late number of the " Saflday School Times' contains a notice of a work by Dr. West, of Philadelphia, in support of the claims of the Sabbath, in which the Doctor is said to have advanced an argument entirely new in support of the position, that the Christian Sabbath is in fact the same day of the week with that of the Jews. The new argument is this: " The sun and moon stood still, at the command of Joshua, about fourteen hours,—and, in the days of Hexekiah, the sun returned ten degrees on the dial of Ahaz, which is the same as the lengthening of the day : ten hours; which time added to that gained in the Kcase of Joshua, makes just one day of twenty-four ' hours!" None will be disposed to say that-this is in fact a new argument. But the question as'to whether it is a good one, of whether it proves what it is supposed to, is an open question, and admits of being examined. Admitting, for th...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

• _, _vnja_^LIGJOir A _BFSIHESS. ._^HpiW-jfew deal practically with the divine prepept, "It is _^pod to be zealously affected in a _gooft thing. J> And yet, the, earnest man we all adinire *r Indeed, a "live "Christian is always an object of high esteem. We go to such a one,for counsel. There is a general looking up to him,,and,he,becomes; by universal consent ".knjghted",with a title of no small honor. His zealous activity', arid pious energy, win for him the epithet, " a pillar of the Church. " No imperial gift can equal this—no "Cross of the Legion; of-Honor " so honorable as this distinctipn of; one that is zealous for the cross of Christ._^. ' - ' ' ._'.-;. ' ./ . .. " .. ¦" ' . . -. The other day, we spoke in commendation of an active Christian brother, to one who was content to take things himself in an easy, dogtrot way. "Oh ! yes," was " the answer, "he makes &-business .of it. " • ; . ' ..-.. That was just it. Here,was the secret of his Christian inf...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

A JfimSTEBIAL ABILITY. The ability to be alone is a great ability. Is ib not peculiarly important for the gospel minister , upon the acquirements of whose heart and brain sueh vast interests depend? At the same time, every church niemb .ei" should be taught its importance for himself. The ability to be, alone (we can mean, of course, only alone in regard to the presence of human beings,) with pleasure, felicity, and effect, is an ability not as easily attained or retained as some may suppose. Doubtless , Satan is ever ready to infuse an irksomeness and gloom into the soul in retirement. To remain half-anhour resolutely and passively alone, shut up with God, is such a grand security for his intimate, enlightening, and invigorating manifestations, that Satan plies all his powers -to prevent it. Satan is not. so much opposed to set seasons of hurried prayer, which mpdiiy, rather than remove business or social pertarBation. He is not so much opposed to merely an intellectual gla...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

AYABIGE. - It is not so easy to account for the iact tbat the vice of avarice commonly increases with age where it has_,been one of the characteristics of the man in his better days, - or-that it often springs .up in the bosom of an old man as a new traifc of character, in cases where it had in no way distinguished his earlier years. Perhaps the true solution is to be found in the fact that, though.it mayhave existed in middle life, either jmj the germ; or in the development _^ yetit was _theni kept in compa rative subjection because the nian was in a condition to satisfy its cravings, or was able, from day to day by Hs labor, to meet his own wants and the wants of those dependent .on; him. Jn old age -the power of accumulating by toil has passed.away. The old man can add nothing to .what he has already gained, and the exhaustion in the supply of his _owu wants, and of those who may be dependent on him, is felt by him to be constantl y lessening what , had. been accumulated ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

OF ¦ ¦ _• ¦_$_[ _^_mt(M_^^m. ^•»*«at _imDE _IfGES THE TRUTH _of the Scripture _Becoras _^ _p^^_rfe_. of Mot, reference to . tbe _^_g_^ dcli red in the Oxford Times, m _JJ»fta * ** the_^vW 1859, on the Bampton _UnirersUy _PaWfJ_^ _gwliwon M. A., late Fei-Eoimd _atfijon - _^ _^e_^CoUcge Editor of « The Hi*. lowand _Tutor ofExeterUO Sh ,the Notes trans]atp , tory of Herodotus ,'J£C Boston :_ck.nld & Lincoln. 53 by V- *• _^_f_^_l_^JfbV Smith, English & Co.. ¦ ¦ ¦¦^• _^_ito^" *^ " _" _^ *¦the Oxford University on_£. _Bampton _foundation S are an _exceeding ly _Suable contribution to Biblical literature. . . . The author is _^distinguished historian, and lr brother has made himself _famous by his explorationin Egyptwhere _tota gathered much va s , _SelnfSmat _ion fti-Ap recently deciphered hieroglyphic*! records, which have remained an _unintefg ible mystery for ages. H _^ bas brought from the_^omain of history, fresh and _convince testimony to the authenticity of ...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

CARI RITTER. This celebrated German _weograpner, wnu died September 28,1859, at the advanced age of 80, deserves notice at the hands of religious journalists of every country, as a shining instance of Christian scholarship. His rare gifts were vigorously and Sttece3sfully.employed> with an evident, devotion to, the interests of Christ's kingdom, in his partteul|? sp here. Only an earnestly Christian ^^ _iould discover and indicate, as he did, the hitferto unsuspected relations between physical _fseience and the religious history of the race. Fro m the breadth and spirituality of his _viiws, he has been called the "Prophetof Physical Geography," and he may well be placed in dontrast with his friend, the almost pagan Huiiboldt, many of whose views he has clothed with their proper Christian associations. The Neni t Evangelische Kirchen-Zeitung, of November jS" t 1859, contains a full and interesting account of the deceased, and his peculiar services as i _^Christian Geogra...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

REV. GE0E6E CHANDLER. The death of this venerable and venerated minister of the gospel has carried grief to ten thousand hearts. For nearly forty-seven years, almost half a century, he has in Kensington gone in and out as the faithful and beloved pastor of a coniding and warm-hearted people. He was regarded ' in Kensington, not simply as the pastor of a single church; not as a Presbyterian preacher only, but as a representative of Christianity itself in Itsf purity and its beneficence. His reputation for godly living was so unquestioned; his spirit was so genial, loving and tender; bis bearing so humble, gentle and benevolent; his charity so impartial, comprehensive and practical; his sympathy for human nature, so independent of the accident of birth, occupation, wealth, or social position; he was so long known, so well and favourably known by all, that he was regarded, not as the property of a sect or single church, but as the loved and cherished patriarch of the whole distri...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — American Presbyterian — 23 February 1860

THE JESUITS IN THE TYROL. A correspondent of the New Evaug. Kirchenzeitung writes from JFeld-Klrche , a town in the mountainous, province, of Yorarlberg_, (which is a part of the Austrian Tyrol,) a letter of such interest that we give a free translation of the most of it for our readers. • Besides a number of industrial establishments which fill up the rocky gorge of the 111, there is one of recent construction which excels all the rest in size, namely, the Pensionate of the Jesuits, In earlier times , Feld-Kirche could boast of a gymnasium of great and well-deserved celebrity. But under the absolutism introduced by the Austrian Concordat, both the higher and lower gymnasia have been surrendered to the Jesuits. They arrange the method of instruction exclusively to suit themselves, without reference to the general plan of instruction ordained by the State, and they are independent of all control or inspection on the part of the latter. They have also an educational Institute ou...

Publication Title: American Presbyterian
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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