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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. I u Vol. VIII. JANUARY, 1896. No. 1. IWKalP j - JLJ H'.BL.Mte.MWA III :.,v- T ! "' ' I 1 & y IW Ono story novor Browing old, Ono'story all dolight to hoar, For agos past, from yoar to joar, Fond mothers to thoir childron told : Tho story of that Hol Night When Christ within a mangor lay, When darknoss ilodboforo tho light, And brightly dawned Redemption's day ; Whon angels from tho starry sky Saug "Glory bo to God on high, And poace on oarth to all mankind With heart and will to truth inclined." ! " I AV - I " "lUBB(S!WWJ811"

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

WJJ 'ft ywfw l 'WT' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. WIDOWED. 'Twas on a Christmas mornin', and I hurrying homo from Mass, Ho faced me in the frosty path an' wouldn't let me pass; In his new frieze and soft caubeen as handsome as a king, He tascd me till I gave him lave to buy the weddin' ring. Mavourneen, 0 mavourneen, The time is far away, But the lightest heart in all the world, "Was mine that Christmas day. We stood on that day twelvemonth, forninst dear Father Mike; 'Twas Lady Fanny baked the cake I never saw the like. My uncle Darmody brought down a piper from Knockawn, (There wasn't one upon the flure could shake a foot wid Shaun.) Mavourneen, 0 mavourneen, But you stepped it free and light, How shy I was, how glad I was How proud I was that night. And on the next day t elvemonth he laned above my bed "My cup of joy is full, Aileen," thim were the words he "said; He tuk the baby from my arm and kissed the downy cheek, ('Twas like a crazy man he was for betther than a week.) Mavourneen, 0...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

,F'r 'AWX ' " T'T'' MMHIMOTMI mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Let us consider how this spark has flamed forth how the fire which the Bahe of Bethlehem came to cast upon the earth has been enkindled, notwith standing the persistent opposition of a degenerate and ungrateful world, to which His first message was one of peace. He did not come as a pretender, un expected, and claiming rights and pre rogatives not already fully established. The historic panorama to which we have alluded is divided into two sec tions. The first, covering a period of 4,000 years, was ushered in by creation's rosy dawn, when God's love-lit smile was the sunlight and life of two creatures, the masterwork of His visible creation, pure and unblemished as the Omnipo tent hand that had formed them ! Since God pronounced the other works of creation good it is an indication of how perfect must have been those two beings whom He made to preside over all the others. But, unhappily, by an act of their own free ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the time of His coming is distinctly pointed out by the prophet Daniel (ix., 22), when he relates in the words of the angel Gabriel, that at the end of seventy weeks of years, and while the city and temple of Jerusalem are still standing, "the Saint of Saints, Christ, the Prince," should be born. Isaias (vii., 14) declares that he shall be born of a virgin of the tribe of Juda and fam ily of David. Micheas (v., 2) distinctly points out the place of his birth, name ly, Bethlehem. And thou, 0 Bethle hem, art a little one amongst the thou sands of Juda; out of thee shall He come forth that is to be the ruler in Israel, and His going forth is from the beginning, from the days of eternity. Here the prophet not only points out the exact place of His birth, but also His eternal divine character. The Prophet Zacharias (ix.) extols Him as the just one, the Savior, and at the same time sets forth His poverty and humility as distinctly as the evan gelist that had witnessed...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. evident as wo consider the facts con nected with tho birth of Christ. Not withstanding the great mass of evidence furnished by the Old Testament, and the reliance of tho Jews on the prophe cies concerning Him, we find our Lord rejected by the great body of tho peo ple, and this, too, in the presence of the fact that His birth is made remark able by manj' circumstances, all tend ing to recall to their mind all that had been written of Him from the begin ning. Mary and Joseph pay Him the first homage, angels announce His birth, and proclaim His divine character and His high and holy mission; tho shep herds hasten to worship Him and offer the choicest fatlings of their flocks, and thoy turn away from His crib to pro claim His presence and tell tho won derful things they had soon and learned of Him ! From distant lands come the wise and powerful of the earth to adore Him, and by their gifts acknowledge His threefold characters of GOD, KING AND MAN. But pursuing the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. there founded. There was her first visible head, the Lord himself ; near Him stands the blessed Joseph, repre senting the princes of the church, who stand near the person of the sovereign pontiff, the vicar of Christ, to care for his personal welfare and that of his en tire household. There are the shep herds coming to do homage to Him, presenting the lambs of their flocks, and then going out from His presence to proclaim to all the wonderful things they had learned there ! They repre sent the bishops of the church who go at times to kneel at the feet of tiik bishop of bishops, present to him testimonials of faith and affection from the flocks the7 are charged to watch over, and then go out from his presence to proclaim to all men the great truths and principles of justice and mor ality that drop from the lips of the in fallible Vicar of Bethlehem's Babe King ! The lambs brought hither by the shepherds represent all the faithful children of the church who are ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. is now usurped by a crowned robber, whoso only right is brute force, and whose only covering for crime and in justice is the shabby robe of degenerate royalty, the threadbare mantle that de scends to him from the vanishing form of a rotten dynasty. It is true all that wore represented at the crib of the infant Savior are still devoted to the venerable Leo XJH., but men whose deity is self, and who are actuated by the spirit of their prototype Herod, are thirsting for his downfall, and the destruction of the kingdom over which he rules, but which par taking of the divinity of its founder, possesses a life, the thread of which no human sword can cut, and safe in the keeping of God, is beyond the venomed darts of its enemies. AVe know not but every coming dispatch brings news that Leo is an exile ! Be it so ! Let him be made more glorious than he is by walk ing in the well-beaten paths of his pre decessors. Forty-seven times a Pope has been compelled to fly the ete...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. DOM BEDE NEGAHNQUET, O.S.B. First Benedictine Indian Monk in America. It may not be amiss to give an his torical sketch of the tribe to whom lie belongs. The word Pottawatomie is derived from u Po-tou-wa," signifying "He maketh or kindleth the fire," while "mie" is an abbreviation of "Kmiek" at or near the sea. It is claimed that when the Great Spirit, through the agency of 'the rising sun, first made known to his Indian children the existence of this Great Island the office of perpetuating the sacred fire was by common consent invested in one of the influential families, to be main tained as the national totem, and in the manner of primitive priesthood was at certain seasons, furnished to other clans or families to be religiously used for the burning of sacrifices, peace and incense offerings to the Great Spirit. But like all changes that time bringeth, it is said that when the vari- the ous clans became numerous, branching off into independent tribes necessari...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

Kannmni THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 9 A of otlior tribos. They have some refinement of manners, and show it towards strangers, a rare thing among our Indians." During the French and Indian war , the Pottawatomies, with the aid of the Chippewas and Ottawas, became the powerful allies of the French, and in the uprising of Pontine they took part in the capture of Fort St. Joseph. ! With the material assistance thus ob tained, they gradually spread ovor Michigan, upper Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin, and unless by causes of great provocation would they retaliate against the neighboring tribos leaving each with only a small council fire or by extinguishing it altogether, as was accomplished against the Illinois tribe at Starved Hock in about the year 1770, for the murder of Chief Pontiac. During and after the Revolution, the Pottawatomies, foreseeing that an en croachment would soon be made on their possessions, became hostile to the American white settlers until the vic tory of General Wayne,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

10 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the traders, that his Indian pupils never received a mouthful of the large droves of hogs donated annually by the good farmers of Ohio; that he made plenty of money for himself but made no success in proselyting the Indians. Previous to 1830 there was a certain amount kept up of the faith that was taught Po-ka-gon's ancestors in years gone by, by some "black gown" who used to reside on the St. Joseph's River probably by Father Allouez, who died at this mission, 1689. To show their attachment to that faith the Chippewas, Ottawas and Pottawatomies, believing they would some day have their children educated, granted through their treaty, 1819, to the rector of St. Anne's church and to the corporation of the College of Detroit, six sections of land in Michigan, to be used or sold as such rector or corporation may deem expedient. Father Stephen Badin, the first priest ordained in the United States, was sent by the Bishop of De troit to become the spiritual adviser...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 11 of lnnd besides granting them the first chance to purchase 1,013 acres of valuable bottom land adjoining the mission at a nominal price of $1.00 an acre, now worth $100.00 an acre. Nor was this accomplished without much opposition, as the Prairie band of Pottawatomies wore then and are yet stubborn pagans. They had the most talented chiefs and orators who wore great in council, and it required the utmost ingenuity and eloquence of the mission Indians to gain their consent to a measure of this kind. The lead ing supporters of the mission then were Wewes-sey, Pah-ma-mio, Mianco and Joseph Lafromboise, the distinguished Catholic Indian chiefs, Okumas and Shopkak, speakers; John Tipton, a well-educated full-blood and an influ ential headman, not only was "the pillar of the church" but was the interpreter in Father Gilland's ab sence. Benjamin II . Bertrand, a well educated headman, was also church interpreter. Joseph N Bourassa, the brilliant orator and United St...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

-"fltyip.pwiijf ' 'PWB'tJJMJF" " 12 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. heaven, have found many obstacles to contend with in this raw country, as was evidenced even in the Pottawatomie school fund matter. A. few white men of A. P. A. propensities, married into the tribe, with probably a dozen of half-breeds, aided by communications in a local paper disseminating specious arguments and misrepresentations of the Sacred Heart Mission school, under took to persuade the Citizen band to have said fund paid out per capita to the members of the band. But thanks to the Christian efforts of influential men like Col. George L. Young, Alex. the fostering care of the Benedictine Fatliers and the Sisters of St. Mary's Academy, will grow up to be indus trious, useful, Christian citizens and their daughters virtuous women well prepared to fill the various stations and duties of life. One of this number mentioned above will one day be able to carry out the Levitical name of his tribe, viz., to " Po-tou-wa," i. o.,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 18 of his tribe in Washington, which office he has faithfully filled several times. Mr. Negahnquet is now the chairman of the Pottawatomie Business Com mittee, which office enables him to act as ex-officio Governor of his tribe. He is an earnest and practical Catholic, a good citizen, and much devoted to the advancement of his people in civil ization. Joseph Moose. THE SECRET OF IT. There's a word in our language, a word of four letters, Which contains the great secret of worldly succeas, And he who will follow the pathway it opens Will escape much of sorrow and earthly distress. Around this great symbol, this wondrous magician, No ancient inscriptions, no mysteries lurk; But open and plain as the book we call sacred Is this powerful helper, this simple word "work." How many there are in our towns and our cities, Who are very reluctant their fingers to soil ; Who are willing to take any genteel position, But turn in disgust from the very word toil. Some few of t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

W-f" U THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 1tc Idiar -Advocate Is a Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indlau Territory, to plead the cause of the Inst remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe ; their progress in education and religion ; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not bo found In any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Mission, (Avoca P. 0.) Okla. Ter. ArrnovED by Right Rev. THEO. MEERSCIIAERT, VlCAIt ArOSTOMC OF OKLAHOMA AND Indian TEimiToiiY. Subscriptions BO Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. JANUARY, 1896. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. A merry Christmas and a happy New Year to each and every one of the read ers of the Advocate. To the friends...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

mmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 16 ence between the Indian of old and the Indian of to-day only serves to illus trate the fact that the race has degener ated physically and morally since civil ization has been thrust upon it. To day the race is a ruined one ruined by civilization. Every game with them is a medium for gambling. There is none of the manly contests of the old days now. They're all beggars, too, and even the very youngest is not ashamed to ask for alms. They live only to eat and sleep, and their thoughts are al ways of the present. The Indian spirit is broken, and nothing but systematic work will revive it." "What will revive the Indian spirit, the Catholic Review adds, is first, the grace of God; second, a thorough education of heart and head and hand, moral, mental and industrial; third, justice from the government; and fourth, the stimulus of need. The man who will hold up his hands in holy horror and roll his eyes like a duck in thunder at the sight of his neighbor's f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

16 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Frederick' the Great was accustomed, whenever he saw a new soldier among his guards, to ask him the following three questions: How old are you? How long are you'in my service? and Do you receive your pay and uniform regularly? A young Frenchman of fine built and noble presence, once desired to become one of the King's guards, but unfortu nately did not understand a word of German. The captain gave him timely notice of Frederick's questions, and made him learn the answers in rotation. At a review, which took place shortly afterwards, Frederick the Great, accord ing to his custom, interrogated the young recruit, but inverted the order of the questions. "How long are you in my service?" said he to the French man. " Twenty-one years," replied the latter. The King looked at the juvenile face before him, could not un derstand how its owner could have passed such a long time in his service, and in a tone of wondering inquiry, asked: "But'how old are you?" "Just one ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 17 The Advocatk has received many letters inquiring about the origin of "Freemasonry." "A monk," it is said in some of the letters, "is posted on everything." How does this agree with the beautiful epithets hurled at the monks, "ignorant and lazy?" As a rule we leave such matters to abler writers, still not to disappoint our pa trons we shall, for once, make an ex ception. The origin of the Order, as we have it now, appears to date from the beginng of the eighteenth century, while an extinct organization which fur nished the motive for Freemasonry, although having no immediate connec tion with it, is some three or four cen turies older. It has been indisputably proven that the institution of Freema sonry took its rise in the guild of oper ative masons which, under the name of the "Fraternity of Masons," was formed by the architect and workmen who were employed from the thirteenth to the fourteenth century in the erection of the Strasburg Cathedral. The flower an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

18 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Some of our philosophers were dis cussing lately the question: " What is the worst predicament in which one can be placed?" One, a beardless youth, maintained that it was that of an old man who is perfectly helpless; another, full of frolic, was of opinion that it was for a man to be both ill and downcast; a third, more wise, declared: " I think there is no worse predicament in which any one can find himself than that of the man who sees the end of life drawing near, and who has never thought of God, nor sought to make his life conformable to God's law." Sacred Heart Priory, Oklahoma Ter ritory, has been erected into an abbey. And now a local paper comes out with a red-fire and slow-curtain speech made by an Italian, in which he says, among other things: "The devil, sev eral years ago, was broken in six pieces. His head went to Spain, which accounts for the haughty Spaniards; the heart to Italy, hence the treacherous Italians; the stomach to Germany, exemplif...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 19 NOT ALONE. I am alone, Unknown ; Who is there in the world to think of ine? Who cares for one so steeped in misery? Who ? God, thy Father, He in heaven above Who looks on men with everlasting love, Ho thinks of thee Most lovingly ; The Sacred Heart that furnace all a lire With tenderness, which burns with deep desire In thee to live And comfort give; Our Ludy, too, the best of mothers; The angels; and the saints, thy brothers; Their thoughts are thine, And care benign, Yea, all the great and holy ones of God, "Who while on earth the path of sorrow trod, Though now in joy, remember former years When they were exile in this vale of tears, And pray for thee With sympathy. Dclieve not thou art alone, Nor say thou art unknown, With such a world of friends in realms above, With all in heaven to think of thee and love. T. a. M. "You can do anything if you have patience," said a wiseacre to li is neph ew. "Water may bo carried in a sieve if you only wait." "How long,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1896

20 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. to got back, to follow it up. Nothing more simple than this to all appear ances. And so I did for two or three hours. When the time to turn home wards came, I had not the slightest doubt of reaching St. John's in the same length of time, and no more than it had taken me to get thus far. I marched up the stream along is pic turesque banks two, three, four hours. What, four hours? Yes; and no sign of the mission. Nay, the scenerj' is quite unfamiliar to me, and different from what I had seen in the morning. Here is a hill with heavy rocks piled up in a most picturesque disorder but but I am lost. I climb up the hill to get a good lookout; perhaps I could discover the mission, some Indian wigwam, or some column of smoke to give me a direction. But no. From the top of the hill nothing can be seen but the clearest sky, without a wreath of smoke, and all around woods, woods, nothing but woods. Hero was a situa tion. I had been lost many a time previous to this, but...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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