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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 November 1918

Republican was a nigger." In addition to a cash five year subscription to the paper that embarassment cost that Bunch Grass politician dinner at the Tacoma hotel for the immediate crowd; but Mr. "Wilson, you need not send but one year's subscription to Cayton's Weekly, that is all that is ex pected of you. At the Thanksgiving service at the Mt. Zion Baptist Church the Rev. J. B. Barber said: "The Lord hath done great things for us, whereof we are glad." "We have today a cause for thanksgiv ing, greater than any since the founding of our Country. The world has more to be thankful for today, than at any time since the birth of Christ. "It is truly, a time of thanksgiving for the whole world. God's hand has stilled the terribly destructive storm, which, for four years and more, has ravaged the earth. The voice of Christ has said, once again, 'Peace, be still', to man's mad, tempestuous wrath. /Our Country has been wonderfully blest. Though woefully late in making vigorous and righteous...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 November 1918

army," answered Broncho Bob. "Thought he was too old 1o fight." "He was. But he was such a fighter that nobody dast tell him so."— Washington Star. A Btudent coming to a hard question on liis examination paper wrote for his an swer: "(jlod only knows, I don't." The paper came back with the following cor rection in the professor's handwriting: "God gels the credit; you don't."—Boston Tran script. "Got any sawdust biscuit?" asked the man in the Third Street grab lunch. "Sure," replied the waitress, who in reality was an heiress. "Well, gimme some of them, a couple of artificial eggs, a stack of straw cakes, a cup of chicory, and a side order of chemical potatoes. And I'll have some bur lap pie. We've got to end this war some how."—Milwaukee Free Press. "Could you let me have a dime?" asked the beggar. "I suppose," sneered the man, "you have a wife and ten children at home?" "No, mister," replied the beggar. "I am trying to raise money to pay the in stallment on my Liberty Bond."—Detro...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 December 1918

* — J&Uf£cft&^Z€j&6fa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South PORT COMMISSION ELECTION While not considered quite so important as the late November election, yet in fact the election today (Saturday) is every whit as important as was it and...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 December 1918

that will go into a ngnt singing." He corrects this betrayal of enthusiasm by an extremely shrewd observation concerning our attitude towards the race. The Negro, he says, gets too much credit when he does a good thing—but he gets also too much blame when he does a bad thing. Colonel Roosevelt, speaking to the Buffalo soldiers at Camp Upton, made his own pleasantly turned comment on this tendency when he assured the boys that General Bell was there to see that they got what they ought to have when they behaved thmslves and also to see that they got what they ought to have when they didn't behave themselves. And the boys roared with delighted laughing apprecia tion of his humor. Humor is perhaps not commonly enough consid ered in appraising the mental equipment of a good soldier. A young lieutenant of the Buffaloes, a Dcs Moinea graduate, puts stress on this point. A soldier who can laugh and sing like the Negro canot, he points out, be unhappy long nor troubled by premonitions of ev...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 December 1918

Yet it is unquestionably true that being a good soldier is a serious thing. As a contrast to Rastus one might quote from a Negro poet who spoke of the colored troops going to France as "Ethiopia paying her debt to the nation which gave the world Dumas!" The attitude of the South toward the Negro sol dier is complicated, difficult to understand, often self-contradictory. In the beginning there were un doubtedly many who felt that this was a "white man's war" and who viewed with apprehension the existence during the war and the return after it of a large body of Negroes who had fought on equal terms and who had learned their power to fight. Exactly what was feared it would be diffi cult to say; probably not armed uprising of the race, but only a general tendency for the Negro to "feel his oats." And of course any race may "feel its oats" too much. The mere wearing of a uniform makes some people lose their heads. And in any case no one will try to deny the Southern contention that theT...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 December 1918

represented in the Signal Corps at this station, and an opportunity is soon to be given the colored men in the Aviation Corps there or elsewhere. Thus again we come back to the army and the Negro as a soldier. But as the war progresses it is the Negro at the front in France who seems to call for notice. Here on the battle-line is his real test as an American in the year 1918. Here he, as well as other races not of- the old American stock, hopes to be fused into the new American ism which embraces all. Here on this old and scarred soil, the Negro hopes not only to receive the cross from Prance, but from America, his own America as he feels it, the even greater prize, American citzenship in a broader deeper sense than ever before. Testimony must come straight from the front. And happily it is possible to reproduce here parts of a letter to Mr. Emmett Scott from a command ing officer of one of the first in France. Himself a white man, he speaks for us all with authority. "I have two ba...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 December 1918

J@aifZch&dzee^f PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACR ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ""Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TE T T.VPOVIT! : BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South Thousands of years ago—long before the great western nations of today, long before even Greek and Roman were heard of— there were more or less advanced civiliza tions on both sides of...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 December 1918

Seal tie and we hope to see the move meet the hearty approval of the general public and receive a most generous support, which would enable the women to purchase an im proved property and at once set about its work. The officers ior the ensuing years are Mrs. (Mara Bonner, president; Mrs. Mattie Oliver, vice-president; Mrs. Ida Wil son, recording secretary; Miss Bennett Dorn, corresponding secretary and Mrs. Delia Whicker, treasurer. The Club already has a membership of 36. For a life mem bership one has to subscribe $100, paying $10 at the time of joining and $5 per month until the amount has been paid in. One can become a charter member by paying $5 initiation fee. The annual dues of all members are $5. The Club will meet twice a month, the first and fourth Tuesdays, the first, the business meeting and the second a membership luncheon. Despite the fact that the men who met at Dr. Cardwell'a office last Friday went on record as opposing any collection being taken up at any of the c...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 December 1918

RED CROSS A HEART A DOLLAR JOIN THE All You Need IS AND DONATED BY H. B. CAYTON

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 December 1918

SOUTHERNER WITHOUT PREJUDICE. "Southerner Without Prejudice" has given a most lucid diagnosis of the situation Yea, so lucid, that it may cause many to overcome their foars as to what may crop out in their offsprings and marry the man or woman, his or her heart is set on and that too despite the fact one or the other may have strains of colored blood in his or her veins. White men raved over the beauties of quadroon and octaroon girls ever since there have been such and that seems to have originated way back yander, when the world begun. Anthropolo gists tell us that the Holy Mary, mother of Jesus Christ, was the offspring of black and white par ents —in short, a mulato. Evidently Joseph fell for her brunett charms. After Cleopatra's armies had been defeated by the all-conquering armies of Julius Caesar she started out, single-handed and alone, to capture Caesar, and being an offspring of a white and colored couple, history says she was a most beautiful woman,, and so she had her se...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 December 1918

J@a^ch& PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. B. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to ■.11 men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE RORCOR CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter. August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ""Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. telephone: beacon 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South THOSE EUROPEAN JEWS Its highly commendable on the part of William Howard Taft to speak out in meet ing in defense of the oppressed Jews through out Europe, who, according to reports in the press from time to time, have had trou bles enough, and it should be remedied by the Peace Conference, if such be possible. Mr. Taft's plea is as follows: The earnest effort of the Jaws of the United States to induce our e...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 December 1918

J@auZcn& Jzeedfo PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. R. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter. August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ''Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Ave. South THOSE EUROPEAN JEWS Its highly commendable on the part of William Howard Taft to speak out in meet ing in defense of the oppressed Jews through out Europe, who, according to reports in the press from time to time, have had trou bles enough, and it should be remedied by the Peace Conference, if such be possible. Mr. Taft's plea is as follows: The earnest effort of the Jaws of the United States to induc...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 December 1918

iis its straining sit a gnat and swallowing ;i camel to gallavant over to Europe to make demands for the Jews over there, when you have ;is many colored persons in the United St.iics ns there are Jews all over the world, who are being persecuted, butchered and burned ai 111 < * stake at a rate ten per month and the bloody work shows no signs of cessation. We realise this article will do little or no good toward remedying evils herein contained, but they are cold, hard i";icts and though they.are passed unnoticed, yel there will come a day when they will all have to be talked over. THE BLACK MAN STOOD PAT The war did more for the Negro American than had been accomplished in several de cades of peace He demonstrated that he could fight, that his willingness and capacity Tor work were unlimited; that he could easily adapi himself to strange surroundings, and thai he understood the purpose of Lib erty Bonds, which he almost invariably bought until it actually and positively "hurt/ On...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 December 1918

• us its straining at a gnat and swallowing a camel to gallavant over to Europe to make demands for the .lews over there, when you have as many colored persons in the United States as there are Jews all over the world, who are being persecuted, butchered and binned at the stake at a rate ten per month and the bloody work shows no signs of cessation. We realize this article will do little or no good toward remedying evils herein contained, but they are cold, hard facts and though they.are passed unnoticed, yet there will come a day when they will all have to be talked over. THE BLACK MAN STOOD PAT The Avar did more for the Negro American than had been accomplished in several de cades of peace lie demonstrated that he could fight, that his Avillingnessand capacity for work were unlimited; that he could easily adapt himself to strange surroundings, and that he understood the purpose of Lib erty Bonds, which he almost invariably bought until it actually and positively "hurt." One of the...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 December 1918

CHRISTMAS "Christmas comes but once a year Let every nigger have his shear," ran a plantation jingo in ante-bellum days of the South, and he or she, who failed to get his or her share of such as there were for distribution was due more to the in capacity of not holding it than to any nig gardliness of the people of the community. "Christinas is not what it used to be" is so often heard and we take pleasure in joining in that refrain. No, to us the Christmas of today is not what it used to be. The joy and hapiness of the Christmas of today are dependent on the amount of money you have to put into it. Each child must have not less than .$lO to make his or her purchases for the other members of the family and in addition the head of the house is expected to see to it that Santa Clans leaves a substantial present for each one. Summing it all up Santa Clans of today, in order to supply the ordi nary family, must be prepared to expend anywhere from $f>o to $100 and at that no extravaga...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 December 1918

CHRISTMAS "Christmas comes but once a year Let every nigger have his shear," ran a plantation jingo in ante-bellum days of the South, and he or she, who failed to get his or her share of such as there Avere for distribution Avas due more to the in capacity of not holding it than to any nig gardliness of the people of the community. "Christmas is not Avhat it used to be" is so often heard and Ave take pleasure in joining in that refrain. No, to us the Christmas of today is not what it used to be. The joy and hapiness of the Christmas of today are dependent on the amount of money you have to put into it. Each child must have not less than $10 to make his or her purchases for the other members of the family and in addition the head of the house is expected to see to it that Santa Clans leaves a substantial present for each one. Summing it all up Santa Clans of today, in order to supply the ordi nary family, must be prepared to expend anywhere from $50 to $100 and at that no extravaganc...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 December 1918

Whai a ]>ily that the President wasn't twins! —( 'olumbia State. Dr. Davis left Poch the final job of pull iim tlic Kaiser's teeth.—Greenville (S. C.) I'h'lmont. Why not punish the Kaiser l),y turning him over I<> the Russians and telling them lie is their new Csart —New York Evening Sun. The grandmother of the Russian revolution is on her way to the United States. We hope she isn't bringing the kid along.—De troil News. A few here and there are beginning to wonder whether the league of nations is going 1o develop into a league of notions.— - K;ins;is ( !ity Star. "Shall we feed Germany and stint our selves.'" asks the Literary Digest. Whatl would yon say was the Inevitable Answer, ollliand .' Chicago Evening Post. 11 may interest some of the good people to know that more cigarettes are now sold by the V. M. C. A. than any other concern in the world.—Los Angeles Times. II is said Unit cotton-growing in the bar mi /.one will be permitted next year. But there will be very muc...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 December 1918

What a pity that the President wasn't twins!Columbia State. Dr. Davis left Foch the final job of pull ing the Kaiser's teeth.—Greenville (S. C.) Piedmont. Why not punish the Kaiser by turning him over to the Russians and telling them he is their new Czar?—New York Evening Sun. The grandmother of the Russian revolution is on her way to the United States. We hope she isn't bringing the kid along.—De troit News. A few here and there are beginning to wonder whether the league of nations is going to develop into a league of notions.— Kansas City Star. "Shall we feed Germany and stint our selves?" asks the Literary Digest. Whatl would you say was the Inevitable Answer, offhand.' —Chicago Evening Post. It may interest some of the good people lo know that more cigarettes are now sold by tin; V. M. C. A. than any other concern in the world.—Los Angeles Times. It is said that cotton-growing in the bar red zone will be permitted next year. But there will be very much more cotton-grow ing in th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 December 1918

J@a#tch& jfe&ffl^ PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Coloied Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACR ROSCOR C AYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter. August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, nVash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TF*'R-P'lT'>i«tu: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South WE THANK YOU Not so many of the subscribers of Cay ton's Weekly responded to its request, that they mail to the office the regular subscrip tion price, which would be considered a Christmas present from each one of them, as we had hoped would do, but quite a few did favorably respond and for the fa vor we heartily thank you. Those who did not respond did not do so because they are any ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 December 1918

J&igfZch& jfeemg PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Coloied Citizens. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TF"l.^F'>wi!! BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Ave. South WE THANK YOU Not so many of the subscribers of Cay ton's Weekly responded to its request, that they mail to the office the regular subscrip tion price, which would be considered a Christmas present from each one of them, as we had hoped would do, but quite a few did favorably respond and for the fa vor we heartily thank you. Those who did not respond did not do so because they are any less lo...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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