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Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,232 items from Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

EETOM OB BEVOLUTIOif . It ia amusing but not very satisfying to read in our exchange the varioui rea sons assigned for the signal defeat of the republicans at the polls. Some say it was the tariff, some charge it to the for eign vote, some say it was the pension question, and so on and eo forth by the column and by the yard. There is some . force in all the alleged reasons, including the one that the nomination of Mr. Whitelaw Reid was - a serious mistake, and that the unfortunate attitude of the administration toward Mr. Blaine went a long way toward giving the party a chill. There is force in all these reasons and all of them had great effect upon the re sult. This was especially true in the central and eastern states. In the west, in the Missouri valley and west to the Pacific, the silver question cut a large figure. But there is one cause for the great po litical revolution greater than all others combined. It was not personal dislike of President Harrison; it was not any charge...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

0 TSSS1 A23 VOOASSZh TEE NATIONAL 00UI0IL. (Continued from pafl i4 box should be the sacred ark of our cove nant, where we can doposit our princi ; (pies tor record with absolute faith that they will be counted as cast. Without this the franchise is a mockery, and our system of government a sham. The spirit of unrest abroad to-day may by such means be suppress a smothered for a timeit will not be palliated or eradicated. It must have vent. The longer it is suppressed, the moie violent will be the explosion when it does come. The duty of every patriotic American citizen, every lover of our country, every true man and woman in our nation is to investigate well the causes of the present unrest. If found to be without just foundation, point out the fallacy. If the claims of organized labor can be proven unjust, no class will repu diate them more quickly than the farm- en, the acknowledged great conservative class of the nation. Temporary defeat will not solve tne problem or stop the agi...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

3JXJI3 AD"VOOATO3i 0 Greonwald & Co., THE People's : Clothiers. must be laid aside, each one resolving to do what we can for the good of the cause. There will, of necessity, be difference of opinion. That is essential to true progress. Wherein we differ let us re member that we are brethren met to gether in an enlarged family circle, to discuss, not personal advantage, but the best interests of the whole family. If a member has erred in judgment he should welcome a correction from his brethren as he would in the home circle. If any brother thinks that in any way the order has been injured by the act of a brother, official or otherwise, it is his duty to the order, regardless of personal friendship or fear of offending, to point out the injury in a fair, fraternal spirit. The interests of our well-beloved order, representing so much of hope for the future, for ourselves, the - nation and the perpetuation of a republican form of government, must be paramount Fraternally, H. L Louc...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

10 H03JETAET OOMMISSIOH. ( Continued from paye 8.) the constitution of the United States reoojrnizes and fixes them as money by the provision that the states shall not make anything but "gold and silver com a tender in the payment of debts." Con gress cannot demonetize either gold or ilver, except under a claim to a general authority over the subject of currency, upon which, if it exists at all, there are no limitations, and which may extend to monetizing any form of paper. If con greea can establish' a legal tender, it is cot prohibited, aa the states are, from making anything "but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts." Between 1821 and 1834, when the legal equivalency between the metals was 15 to 1, gold was at a premium m silver of from 5 to 7 per cent and disappeared from the circulation, and but little was brought to the mint for coinage. The gal relation of value between the metals of about 18 of silver to 1 of gold es tablished in 1831 was an undervaluation of si...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

TCZZ3 -AJDVOOiTn. 11 Tie Bay State Talis. Editor Advocate: I am proud of Kansas. It shows the people can be de pended upon.' It was the battle ground of the money power against the people. The people being victorious, Kansas be comes the battle shout for the nation's emancipation. History is reproduced. Kansas was the vanguard in the emanci pation of slavery, through the formation of the republican party. Its mission ended. It surrendered to the money power, which enslaved the producers of this nation, who inherited the right to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness, The eleotion shows the revolution going on. The people repudiate protection as a tax, in place of which they adopt a tariff for revenue only, which they will dis cover is no lees a tax, and that there is not one monopoly it will destroy. The republican party can never make another campaign with any hope of success. The democrats have nothing to deliver to the people but husks- Now is the-time for the people, and the fi...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

12 SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT. Showing the vote of the several candidate for congress in Kansas for 1892, together with columns showing the highest republican vote ever previously cast in each county of the state, the highest plurality previously had over the leading candidate, and the republican decline in each county as com pared with the vote on congrfessman-atdarge in 1892. "Republican losses "show up" in every county of the state, and the boasts of the party of an "82,000 majority" for 1888 in Kansas then claimed as the banner republi can state are likely to be heard of no more. The boasted " bramiest man " of the state was on the stump from Doniphan county on the northeast lo Morton county on the southwest, and from Cheyenne on the northwest to II II 1 1 I 1 ! 1 1 Jl T. 1 UneroKee on ine soutneasc, ana yet repuoucan losses nave ionoweu ms plu tocratic march as he has discoursed to the noble yeomanry of the state. FIRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT. Counties. Atchison Brown Donipha...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

13 the'' Homestead men and will probably declare the strike off to-morrow. LOSSES THAT IT CAUfllD. The strike at one time involved nearly 10,000 men and the loss in wages will reach, it is said, in the neighborhood ot $2,000,000. Then there ia the immense loss to the firm, which cannot be esti mated, but which conservative people nut at least double the amount lost by the men in wages. To tbia can be added nearly $500,000 paid to the state troops and the cost to the county of Aliegneny for the riot, treason and other cases ffrowinsr out of the strike. At least thirty five deaths were directly caused by the strike. The attempted assassination of Chairman Frick of the Carnegie com pany ia also indirectly credited to the strike. 00MMSHTS ON THE ACTION. St. Louis, Mo., November 20. A copy of the dispatch from Homestead an nouncing that the strike had been officially declared off, was ahown by an associated press reporter to leading men in the Knights of Labor to-night General Master Wor...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

OPERATIONS OF THE MINT. Export of Director Leach for the Last Fiscal Tear, Washington, November L Mr. E. 0. Leach, director of the mint, has sub mitted to the secretary of the treasury a report on the operations of the mints and assay offices of the United States for the fiscal year ended Jane SO, 1892. The value of the gold deposited at the mints and assay offices during the year was $06,476,975. Of the original deposits $31,961 646 were the product of our own mines; $24,935,342 foreign gold coin and bullion; $557,968 light weight domestic gold coin; $3,036,004 old material. The deposits and purchases of silver agjre gated 72,121,268 standard ounces, of the coining value of $83,922,930. Of the sil ver received 03,130.609 standard ounces, of the coining value of $73,461,072, were the product of domestic mines and re fineries; 2,118,073 standard ounces, of the coining value of 2,464,672, were foreign silver bullion and coin; 5,593,907 stand ard ounces, of the coining value of $6, 509...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

TT23 iUTQOilTQ 16 rrUTM Photography. And now let us measure this prreat- . m j. 1 v-!JA Tfca ncf nil Cat 01 uaiura unugta. .ano ipau of the great natural Bridge of Pine Creek, Arizona, 13 over .v Ave -'hundred feot that ii about five times the span of the Virginia bridge. Its height from floor of bridge to surface of water ia forty feet less than its small brother's; but to the bottom of the stream's bed the proper measurement, of course it 13 fifty feet greater. But In its breadth that is, the measurement up and down stream it is over six hundred feet, or more thai twelve times as wide as the Virginia bridge! In its vast size lies the impossi bility of photographing thii bridge. There is no point from whic- the eye can take it in at once. Miles ct walk, ing are necessary before one really un derstands it. From the bed of the stream, half the dignity of ths arch Is lost Deninct tne Douiaers, uaue gew i . i i ii it.. ....I.. J OH iar enougn 10 see uu uie cpeum. If near enough for a c...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 23 November 1892

10 We bwt lor N-n the LEAD . INO L0W-F2ICiW GSOCiUi OF KAN3A8. It will pa? yon to W.H.H. URIMEX, CD. M.SMITH, CHURCH Q. BRIOOEFOSCb d a write u for oar WEO a.a J AXiii price to runners and Alliances. 'V We will tare you money on any order, laxxs or small, whether you are near or distant. GREEN & KALE, WIZOLiISOAZiI3 and ZIZSTiUXi GrX&OOZIZO, Refer to any bank here. TOPEKA, KAS. J. H. CANNON, M. D., TOPEXA, KANSAS. Offloe A28 Kansas ate. Thone 433. Office boon io to 12, 3 to A. Eesidence uoi weotwnst. uzxry ur. roby, m. d., Consulting and Operating SURGEON, Office, 118 W. Sixth Ave., Topeka, Kas. DENTISTRY A. 0. SLOAN. Tha famous STEAD JfAN process for partial plate used. Beat work at reasonable prices. 8. Vf, Cor. Eighth and Qnlney (ground floor), TOPEKA, - KANSAS, JUWS ABB CHEAPER NOW than they ever will be again. Bay a farm cheap and on bast tsbms and low nmaasT of the LANDS in every TV AMERICAN LAND county in Kansas. Ill & IMMIGRA'N CO. Over 2,000 farms at a TXBT LOW ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

AND TOPEKA TRIBUNE, YOU IV. NO. 15. $1.00 A YEAR, f TOPEKA, KANSAS, WEDNESDAY, NOVEHBEB 30, 1892. 1 OmCIlt PAPEB OF TUB IFJBIOPLX'a PAKTf OF KANSAS. SECEETAEY POSTES TRAPPED. Jbwsxl Citt, Kas Ootober 3, 1802.V Mr. Q. L..Dannellst Gibsonburg, Sandwsfo County, Ohio: ! Dbab Sib: I understand that you pur chased a farm from Mr. Foster (who is now secretary of the United States treasury) ia 18G6, payinsr him 7-30 notes for the same Enolosed find stamp for reply, and you will do me a favor by answering if the above is oorreot. Give detailed answer of purohase and payment, and oblige, Frank It. Fobbest, Jewell City, Kansas. . Gibsonbubq, Ohio, Ootober 17, 1892. Mr. Frank B. Forrest, Jewell City, Kansas: Dxab Sib: In regard to enquiries enolosed to me, will say, that in 18G6 I purchased eighty Boxes of unimproved land of Hon. Chas. Foster, now secretary of the United States treasury, for the sum of $800.00; and apart of first payment was mads in 7-30 notes, the exact amount I have forgotten...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

3 M03JETABT 00MMISSI03T. Eeport of the United States Monetary Commission, Appointed by Act or won greea August 15, 1876. HO. XXII. Great importance of tilter in the mone tary Mttory of me country. A very disingenuous and unworthy at tempt is made to belittle the importance of silver in the monetary history of the country, and to misrepresent what is in tended by its remonetization, by Herat ing and reiterating the totally irrelevant fact, that one particular silver com, the dollar piece, was never coined at the mints in large numbers. This fact is of no more importance that the other fact, which is equally true, that the gold coin of the value of one dollar has been minted in only email numbers, and is now not permitted to be minted at all. It is not a particular silver coin, the re monetization of which is demanded, but it is the metal silver, in whatever de nominations of coins the iaw may au thorize and depositors of silver bullion at the mints may choose to demand. The reasons w...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

3 Itefl States Treasury Mis Expose! IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES. April 28, 1880. Ordered to be printed. December 11, 1880. Ordered to be reprinted. Mr. Davis, of West Virginia, from the Select Committee to Investigate the Finance Reports, Books and Accounts of the Treasury Department, submitted the fol lowing report : (No. 4. Continued from last week.) REGISTER THE OFFICIAL BOOK-KEEPER OP THE GOVERNMENT. The register is the official book-keeper cf the government, nd no money can lawfully go into or out of the treasury unless upon warrants passing through the register's office, and yet a secretary of the treasury ordered the register to change his offioi d statements to congress and enforced the order against the protest of the register, the changes involving many millions of dollars and oovering a long series of years. The register's duty to make full and truthtul official statements is as old as the government, while statements from the office ot the secretary in this regard...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

4 t r ii AIJD TOPEKA TRIBUNE. Omotu. Papm oi thi Pmopu'i Pabtt ov Kansas. N. R. P. Published every Wednesday by THE ADVOCATE PUBLISHING CO. Rooms 43 and 45 Knox Building, TOPEXA, KANSAS. $1.00 PEK YEAR. ADVERTISING RATES. Display matter, 20 cent per line, Agate meas urement, (14 Unci to the Inch..) Beading notices, 40 cent per line. Address all communications to TKI ADVOCATE PUBLISHMa CO., Topeka, Kintit. Entered at the post office at Topeka, Kansas, ai second olaia matter. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30 1893. If that comet bad struck the earth next day after the election it wonld have been a great relief to nnmerons republicans. But it would take more than that to break Kansas m two. A Topeka republican who doesn't take any interest in astronomy says this talk about the Biela comet threat ening' to come in contact with the earth is a fake which was started by the Populists before the election to divert publio attention from the main issue, the tariff. . A large number of what Mr. Cleve lan...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

0 ita publication is that he desired to let the people know what was going on. There is a very significant incon sistency in this reason of Dr. Macune. He complains bitterly of some matter that has been published in the Advo cate and in the National Reformer relative to himself, claiming that if he had done wrong, we should have presented the matter to the supreme council for investigation, instead of publishing it in the papers. To this we might give his answer: "We did it to let the people know what was going on." We might further suggest that if Mr. Till man had done wrong in the publi cation and distribution of this ad dress, Dr. Macune should have brought the matter before the su preme council for investigation, in stead of publishing it as he did But this excuse is altogether too transparent. If Dr. Macune really did not approve of the contents of this supplement, and if his purpose in publishing it was to afford a warning to the people of what Mr. Tillman was doing, why did h...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

c -axnrooLaTiB, OUR CUSTOM HOUSE SYSTEM. It is quite evident that the great blessings of paternalism, as at pres ent practiced by the government, are not fully understood or appreciated by the people. Paternalism is only ob jectionable to the class that is crying out so loudly against it, when it is proposed tc extend it so as to embrace all the people in the enjoyment of the privileges it bestows. When lim ited to a few favorites it is entirely satisfactory. We could ask no better illustration of this fact than is afforded by our present custom house system. What proportion of the people of the United States understand this system? Evidently it is very small, otherwise a cry would go up against it which could not fail to sooner or later command a hearing. It affords an example of special privilege almost without a parallel in the busi ness affairs of any nation or time. What is a custom house? It is a public building erected by the gov ernment at the expense of the whole people. Wh...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

7 THS NATIONAL BEPOBM PSES3 ASSOCIATION. So many of the members of our re form press association are members of the Alliance, and so many of them are usually delegates to the national council, that it is difficult to get them together for business during the ses sion of the council. It has therefore been decided at the recent meeting in Memphis to hold no more meet ings at the same time and place as the national council, and the consti tution was changed accordingly. There being some important business which requires early attention, it was decided to hold the next meeting February 22, 1893, and Washington, D. C, was selected as the place of the meeting. Arrangements will be made to secure transportation, and it is desired that all members of the association and all who wish to be come members shall attend. There will not only be important business matters to attend to, looking to the financial interests of our papers, but the opportunity will be afforded to visit places of interest...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

8 COIOSNTEATD 0US3EDNESS. Ia there a Populist in Kansas who did not stand ready, after the resnlt of the election was declared, to take bis republican adversary by the hand and forgive him of ad the meanness that bad Jbeen perpetrated during the campaign, if the latter would only show a disposition to reform ? We think not, and we verily believe that even the democrats would have shown a similar disposition. But what do we find the prevailing spirit in the defeated party? Simply a spirit of double distilled depravity aud a dia bolical desire to destroy, all growing out of too long continued domina tion. In some localities this spirit even pervades the school room and the church, for we have heard of preach ers, since the last election, deprecat ing the farther success of the new political party, while teachers, whose greatest accomplishment is their prejudice, have driven the same into the minds of their pupils. And so it is not much wonder that while Kansas is the most enlightened ...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

0 00MPAE1TIYE STEIUGTH. Eepublican Strength in the Kansas Legis lature of 1889, as Compared with the one of 1893. In 1888 the republicans of Kansas held high carnival over their famous victory. Governor Humphrey had a plurality over John Martin of 73,361; Bishop W. Perkins had a clear ma jority of 403 in the Third congressionl district; Edward H. Funston, 4,146 in the Second; Samuel It. Peters, 4,524 in the Seventh; Edmund N. Morrill, 4,546 in the First; Erastus J. Turner, 6,072 in the Sixth; John A. Anderson, 7,378 in the Fifth, and Thomas llyan, 9,586 in the Fourth district. Of the 165 members elected to the legislature, all were republi cans, except a senator and representa tive from Leavenworth county, and a representative from each of the coun ties of Clark, Marshall, Neosho and Stafford. But in four short years from that time, they might profitably pause in their mad and wild career as they "Stand up for Kansas, " to in quire, f Where in the world are they now at ?" Could they...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate and Topeka tribune. — 30 November 1892

10 "WHERE ABE WE AT?" Another Penitent Editor Apologizes to Hit Oonscienco and His Headers. The election is over and party politics relegated, but aa an editor, like Tenny non'a brook, must go on forever, it may prove as profitable to join the big ex perience meeting and talk of the reason for the faith within us as to groan over pains of heart and brain that must finally lapse by limitation and cease to hurt. As all of the great statesmen of the country, including an ex president who was reelected, and a president who wasn't, and who therefore becomes in turn the ex-president, are airing their opinions as to the sudden, overwhelming and evidently unexpected knocking out of Billy Patterson, it might not be amiss, if even presumptive, for the Eagle to fill in a little space on its own account There appears great unanimity upon the part of the gentlemen cited touching the observation that the McKioley bill proved a catapault that worked like a petard in its hoisting tendencies; that a...

Publication Title: Advocate And Topeka Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
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