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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

shower or two have washed the grass so that it is sweet and clean. How the cattle do enjoy the change! And there is no question but that they do much better than when con fined in the same pasture all the time. Shade is an essential to the comfort of stock. In the heat of the day they spend many hours resting under the trees. Of late years, the horse-fly has made life a burden anywhere unless we use means to keep it away. Some good preparations are now on the market, and we can ourselves mix oils and certain acids very cheaply so that we are able to do away with a great deal of the misery which would otherwise be caused by the flies. THOROUGH MILKING. An experiment reported by Buer stenbinder shows the influence of the process of milking upon the production ot milk. Five cows were milked for a fort night by a milker. A, in the usual manner, no instructions being giveu him as to the exercise of more than his ordinary skill. During the fortnight, the same cows, which were fed in exact...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

s Ranche and Range. In the Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists and Stockmen of Washington, Oregon. Idaho. Montana. Utuh and British Columma. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit, Growers' Association-for Washington. Oregon, Iduho and Hritlsli Columbia. Subscription (in advance) ... $1.00 Per Year. HILLER FREEHAN, - - - Editor. Address all communications to RANCHE AND RANQJS, Box (HMf, North Yakima, Washington. Come, come, "Jane," let us hear from you ! Surely you have something to say. The beekeepers are waiting to hear from you. This continued silence will never do. The Yearbook of the Department of Agriculture for 1897 is now being generally distributed. It is a fine work and the information it contains is of incalculable value to the farmers. It can be obtained by sending your name and address to the Department of Agricul ture, Washington, I). C. Farm hands are scarce in the wheat districts of East ern Washington. An army of laborers is needed to harvest the big yield of g...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

De Laval "ALPHA" Cream Separators Ct*eamei*y and Dairy JVlaehinery and Supplies. Jgl7 Alpha No. 1 What the 1897 Wisconsin State Experiments Show: SHCOpg^ Belt Separator. That many "Alpha De Laval" machines in every day use are skimming' as wonder f£jr® I fully close as .03; that the average is from .05 to .065; and that but one machine out of fs||»?«"s^x those personally tested by Prof. Farrington was leaving more than .1. Wfl^Sj \ ■ /y Thai the "Reid-Danish" machines are leaving an average of three times as much (JHrj^kgL /'//'/ fat in the skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." • , nE^fllPH Tri^ i^. That the "U. S." machines are leaving an average of three times as much fat in the fßHjfj^^ aj^MIMA skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." , . l.gffir' That the "Alexandra-Jumbo" machines are leaving an average of four times as •' "3 Iff v/mll^l/ much fat in the skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." • ■;< i^«uL' > v - Jmxmj That the "Sharpies-Imperial Russian" machines are leaving an average...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

1O ¥i}B Floaks. TRAINING A SHEEP DOG. At what age should I begin the training of a shepherd pup, and can you give me detailed instructions as to methods of training, asks a sub scriber of the American Sheep Breeder. The following reply is given: Begin training in the most cau tious, natural way at two months old, or as soon as the puppy is able to follow you among the sheep. If he comes of good stock he will take naturally to sheep, as a duck does to water, and will be very quick to interpret your wish and ambitious to execute it. Your main trouble will be to restrain and teach him moderation. Like all puppy kind he will be impetuous and inclined to hurry and worry the sheep too much. Deal gently with him. Don't whip him or show your displeasure by dramatic tantrums, yells and threats. If of the right sort, the young dog will catch your mean ing with a word, motion of the hand or head and even the expres sion of your tace. The young coolie is intelligent, tractable and impres sionab...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

Poultry YarJ. POULTRY BUSINESS LEADS. During the last quarter of a cen tury the poultry industry has de veloped into the largest agricultural industry of this country. The value of the poultry industry is underes timated by the American people, and it has not been until recently that attention has been called to the vast wealth which lies at our very door. Careful inquiry reveals the astounding fact that the United States, instead of producing more eggs than are required for home consumption, imports annually over $2,000,000 worth of eggs. New York state and city consume about $45,000,000 worth of eggs and poultry annually, and the popu lation of both state and city is about 5,800,000. The United States, with a population of 63,000,000, will con sume proportionately about £495, --000,000 worth of eggs and poultry a year. In order that the full value of the industry may be determined correctly, we must add to the above $63,000,000 for the value of fowls retained for breeding and layi...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

12 *Ffoa Hilary. BUZZINGS. BY MRS. CHAS. LXX. It will pay the fruit grower to keep a few colonies of bees, even should he obtain no honey. There are about 5000 bees to the pound. A gallon of honey weighs 11 to 12 lbs. according to density. In fair weather bees will go quite a distant to bloom, but in a cool or wet time they will not go far. E. H. Schaeffle, Gleanings, page 486, complains that his bottom starters have a bad habit of curling over. Perhaps they were too wide. We use 3/8-inch and find no trouble, even when taking supers as far as Sunnyside. Just now bookkeepers are dis cussing the best way to put extracted honey on the market. Some advo cate truit cans, others lard pails. Surely something should be done along this line, so as to accommo date all classes of purchasers. E. B. Root in Gleanings says it does but little good to put anything on a bee sting, for the reason that the applied remedy cannot reach the depth of the wound. Strong tobacco juice will prevent swelling e...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

Swiri© Department. HOG RAISING.-No. 2. BY W. A. HART. In selecting your parent stock, select individuals that in conforma tion are what you desire in your herd. You cannot afford to use a bear that is not well cared for, well developed, of a quiet disposition and a good feeder, one that takes on flesh readily atid does not fret. The same may be said of the brood sow. Never keep a brood sow that will not permit you to go into her pen and handle her pigs either at far rowing or at other times without her fretting. This may seem to many like theory yet it is identical with the practice I have followed in my herd; and I beg to say as a re sult of it I have not a single indi vidual, either boar or sow that frets when I pick up a pig and have it make a fuss. From such sows you will be able to raise more pigs and from such parents a better lot of feeders. No farmer would think of selecting his seed from poorly tend ed, immature corn, neither should he try to raise pigs from such par entage...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

14 SUMMER FALLOW A FALLACY. Recently Regent H. S. Bland ford, of Walla Walla, is endeavor ing to arouse an interest among the Walla Walla farmer boys in the State Agricultural college, addressed the following note to Prof. John A. Balmer, of the department of horti culture in that institution: You are of course aware that the prevailing custom of our farmers in Washington is to cultivate their lands to wheat for one year, and then summer-fallow, leaving the lands bare and idle for the next year. The two principal reasons for this custom are that they thereby obtain two years' rain for one crop, and the better prevention of weeds. I understand you oppose this plan of letting the lands lie idle. Please give me your reasons for this. Mr. Blandford received the follow ing reply: Pullman, Wash., July 22, '97.- Hon. H. S. Blandford, Walla Walla, Wash.-- Dear Sir : Replying to your inquiry in the matter of summer fallowing, I would say: I oppose the practice on the grounds that it is waste...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

dy ? To my mind it lies in intro ducing a leguminous crop to replace the summer-fallow. No system of farming has long been a success where legumes were not a part in the rotation of crops. Peas, beans and the clovers are what we will fall back on to help us out ot our present muddle. Probably the very best system we can adopt here in Eastern Washing ton where clovers do not grow naturally, is to alternate our wheat crops with one.of peas. Peas have a high nutritive value in all classes of feeding; they do not impoverish the soil by robbing it of its nitro gen; on the contrary, the ground on which peas have grown will be found richer in nitrogen after crop ping than before. This comes from the property peas have of gathering free nitrogen from the air, leaving the ground richer in that essential element of plant growth. With such a system of farming it will be necessary to keep more stock to consume the extra produce. Cat tle, sheep, and hogs, all thrive ad mirably on peas, either as...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 5 August 1897

i 6 ft ||jg POLSON=WILTON HARDWARE CO. II v /^y' 821-823 Western Avenue, /^CJJiv^ Irll^M —3 'Seattle, = = - -. Washington. tl\'i/^L^^SiK<ui\ ■ Wholesale and Retail, ■ff^ra^^^'^l^ "sS===^_ FARM MACHINERY J3j[W^ ■ . Wagons, carriages, haying tools 7-»j^iifc^ -~*say7 , - 'yss/ harvesting machinery, field and Deerin'g Ideal Mower, Roller and Ball Bearings. garden Seeds. PuiTipS, Wind M'lllS, &C. . You Should Not Forget that We are Headquarters for FARM IMPLEMENTS AND SUPPLIES — SUCH AS — Machine Oil, Binding Twine, Hay Forks, Scythes and Snaths, 5 and 1O Gallon Milk Cans. We Guarantee Both Quality and Price! Y»l*:ixxia Hardware Co., Successors to Fred Pennington = rl = North Yakima, Washington. Creameries, Dairy Butter Makers, Cheese Makers, Fruit Growers! We are Northwestern Agents and Headquarters for the Following Lines: Stewart's Corrosive Sublimate Tablets for Preserving Com posits Milk Samples for Babouok Text. Are Hecurate because each jar lias the same ■ mountof preservat...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

Ranche and Range. OI,D HEKIKH, VOL. .'t, NO. 52. I NKW HEHIKS, VOJ,. 1, NO. ll>. \ SUGAR BEET CULTURE. Dr. Wiley, of the Department of Agriculture, in a recent address, maintained that it was possible to grow ))eets on i ,000,000 acres to supply all the sugar needed in the United States. The sugar beet was destined to revolutionize agricultural practice in many sections of our country. It was itself a most valuable experiment station, and was teaching the farmers something of the value of scientific methods. In order to grow the sugar beet successfully it must be grown scientifically, and when the results of such methods were seen with this crop, the same methods would be applied to others. Statistics have shown that in every locality where the sugar beet is grown, land has more than doubled in value. So far in this country the greatest difficulty was on the agricultural side. The farmers did not know how to raise the crop. They are now being educated, and soon the sugar beet wil...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

2 Horticulture. [CURE FOR CUT WORMS. HY IIOKTICITMJKAI. COMMISSION ■« lIAKEH. What are commonly known as cut worms are the larva of various species of butterflies and moths, so in any special mention of them it is essential to know what species is under consideration, as their habits and modes of life differ. It is likely that the one mentioned below is classified as the larva of Agrotis snffusa, which is known to work upon corn in the eastern states, and while this variety may yield to the treatment described, it remains to be ascertained whether other varieties w rill do so. It is possible that a sweetened bait would be attractive to larva generally, as it is well known by collectors that a mixture of sugar and beer or rum and molasses is attractive to moths and is used as a bait when mixed to a consistency somewhat lighter than molasses, and smeared on the trunks of trees or plants. It may be a fair inference that a taste for sweets runs in the family, and as cut worms are a grea...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

A VERY CHEAP SPRAYING OUTFIT. Spraying a solution of arsenical compounds mixed with lime and vitriol has become a necessity in almost every orchard or vineyard. The best fruit growers have learned the value of this work and do not hesitate in purchasing the best ma chinery and employing the most skilled persons for protecting their trees aud vines. But the farmers with only a few trees and a little garden patch of small fruits fre quently feels that he cannot afford the new fangled notions of his more wealthy friends and neighbors. Every owner of tree or vine should have some method of extermina ting insects, and as home-made tools are usually cheap and quite effective I will tell you how to make an excellent sprayer. Buy a new broom for your wife and take the old one for a spraying machine. Mix the insect medicines in an old tin bucket, coal oil can, barrel or other vessel and set under the trees or beside the vines. Dip the broom into the solution, and throw the water right and le...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

4 POINTS ON IRRIGATION. i". s. FOGG. Grain, grass, vegetables and trees may each call for the application of water in separate ways. Different soils call for different application, different quantities at an application, and different spaces of time between applications. If a soil is loose, a larger quantity may be used if at a time and less length of time. If the sail is compact, or the lands falls off rapidly, far better results may obtained by using just water enough to keep the entire length of furrow absorbing water, and con tinue the stream twenty-four or forty-eight hours. In irrigating vegetables, less time will suffice, than if the water is to be forced down to tree roots. At the same time allowance must be made for exhaustion by evaporation sooner, even under good cultivation than when forced deeply into the soil. By actual test I have proved that trees 'made far better growth, even in loose soil, where water was run twenty-four hours slowly, after the soil is first wet, t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

C^atlls. HEREFORDS ON THE RANGE. Tom POUTING. Since the cattle trade is again looking op, those who have con sidered the "old cow" as the most profitable bovine property, are now in the first rank with large numbers of serviceable mothers of beef. The long-horned Texas steer is rapidly becoming extinct upon the western ranges. He has served his day and generation well, but as he refused to mature until fully grown, he has been pushed aside by a more pro gressive race, which can be made prime at any age from six months up. The type required by cattle men today is the short-legged, blocky, early maturing, mellow fleshed ones so characteristically em bodied in the Hereford. Color in cattle is their most valuable token of trueness of breed, their strongest evidence of stability and potency in transmission. It matters not what a Hereford bull may be mated with, the offspring will bear a white or mottled face ; and this characteristic marking has won for the "white faces" a favorite disti...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

0 Dairy, LIKES OUR ATTITUDE. It does us good to get such let ters as the following and makes us feel well repaid for our efforts to im prove our stock and dairy herds: BY M. F. HACKEY. Editor Ranchr and Range:— I was much impressed with the ad vice you gave in one of your editor ial notes in regard to keeping none but well bred cattle. Especially will this apply to the family milk cow. There are a great many people who are feeding and caring for cows the year round which do not pay for their keep, to say nothing of the trouble of milking them and caring for the milk before it is ready for the churn; and I make this asser tion that the milk obtained from a coarse, ill-bred cow is neither palata ble nor healthful. The writer could never drink milk until he commenced using from a Jersey cow. The milk from an ordinary scrub cow is almost poison to my system, causing severe pains in the bowels. The general im pression seems to be that milk is the same anywhere and everywhere; but when yo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

STRIPPINGS. BY M. L. MATTKRSON. Don't he afraid of hot water in cleansing all dairy utensils. The strippings contain the most cream, therefore save all the milk. James Cheesman of Canada says: "No dairy can be worked without a thermometer.'' If you haven't a good barn for the cows next winter better begin providing for one now. It will pay you. If you are just coming out even financially a separator will save enough more cream to give you a profit. Dairying, like every thing else nowadays, is progressive, and to be successful a dairyman must be pro gressive. The strippings (short paragraphs) in our farm papers are often richest in cream (practical thoughts), there fore read by all. Nothing pays better than to do well that which we do. With this thought in mind we may meet with success in the dairy. Cows, like people, are apt to play "tit for tat," so be sure your "tats" are of a kindly nature, and thus aviod ugly cows. Strain the milk as soon as possi ble after milking and thus save...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

8 Ranche and Range. ISSUED EVEET THVESDAT. In the Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists and Stockmen Of Washington, Oregon, Idaho. Montana, Utah and BrttMh Columbia. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association—for Washington. Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. .subscription (1« BdvoHce) ... *1.00 Per Year. HILLER FREEHAN, - - - Editor. Address all communications to IIANCHE AND RANGE, Se al tie, Washington. PROGRESS. The headquarters of Ranchk and RANGB are this weeks transferred to Seattle. The business has grown at so gratifying a rate and the field has so rapidly en larged that the change of location has become neces sary in order to give more prompt and complete service to our patrons. The fact that Seattle is in close touch through her many lines of communication with every part of our field and allows the saving of be tween twenty-four and forty-eight hours in the hand ling of our correspondence and newspaper mail, will prove an important factor in our furth...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

De Laval "ALPHA" Cream Separators Cp.eametry and D&ii*y JVlaehihetty and Supplies. JShL Alpha Nil i What the 1897 Wisconsin State Experiments Show: »>Blpp^^T Belt Separator. That many "Alpha De Laval" machines in every day use are skimming as wonder : \ fully close as .03: that the average is from .05 to .065; and that but one machine out of j^pg^TK^. those personally tested by Prof. Farrington was leaving- more than .1. HffPlpi^^ // Thai the "Reid-Danish" machines are leaving an average of three times as much JHJ/'^^tt, //</ . fat in the skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc aval." / AE* v|4l^/^ That the "U. S." machines are leaving an average of three times as much fat in the ■■P 7 yjfgmM skim milk as tin- "Alpha-Dc Laval." BHlir That the "Alexandra-Jumbo" machines are leaving an average of four times as lair y^mW^i much fat in the skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." fra^L - ±S^- • Jk^L That the "Sharpies-Imperial Russian"' machines are leaving an average of five mß&L'As^** X'£%...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 August 1897

10 Wtis Flocks. DIPPING SHEEP. A writer in the lowa Homestead of July 2 has this about the sheep dipping at the Union stock yards, Chicago: "The action of the stock yards company in requiring the dipping in an infusion of cigar stubs and tobbacco stripping.*? of all sheep in tended for export has aroused the shippers of fat muttons to a vigor ous protest, which resulted recently in a modification of the order. It is hereafter proposed to dip nothing but scabby sheep. The dipping or dinance promulgated by the De partment of Agriculture has been in full force for some time, but it is only since the establishment of the tank at the stock yards that it has been in effect. Acting on the theory that prevention is better than cure, the healthy animals have been sub jected to a dipping operation as well as those affected with disease. "It is claimed the dip used has had a bad effect on the health of the sheep and places them in an un fit condition for an ocean voyage. A recent shipment of o...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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