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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

Ranch, states that horticulturists of that <tate have made a mistake in allowing the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association to tske the place of a state horticultural so ciety. We believe there is no doubt that V'r. Waldett is right. The Northwest Asso ciation was organized to look after the busi ness part of the fruit-growing industry. The special object of horticultural societies is to promote knowledge in horticultural matters and keep up that interest in horticultural investigation which is essential to real ad vance. The average fruit grower can more easily see the benefit which results from the business organization than that which re sults from a promotion of the Study of horti cultural problems, itt the long run the lat ter is. however, of the greater importance. —()regon Agriculturist. The apple crop will be short in the United States and prices will rule high compared with last year. It will pay any year to take good care of the apple orchard but especially mi when the cr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

zo THE POULTRY YARD Raw winds and damp weather are bad for little chicks. Coal oil the roosts frequently to keep down the red mite pest. The first chickens in the market will bring seventy-five cents each. The farmer who tries to make money on fowls should endeavor to have early birds in the market We are partial to the hen for the reason that she is regular in her re sults and the income is in fact al most perpetual Where there is one hen too fat to be a profitable layer there are fifty too thin in flesh to take the interest in lay ing they should. It pays to raise chickens for every season of the year but the earlier they are the sooner they will sell and the more they will bring. The reports from every quarter this year is to the effect that eggs are hatching well. Eggs are remarkably fertile this year and a fine crop of lit tle chicks is promised. By getting the henhouse and flock free from vermin now it will be com paratively easy to keep it clean thro' the summer and the welfa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

HOLLY I CHICK! FEED t, The cheapest feed for little • • chicks. • I BECAUSE: • ftl With this food and plenty of • I green stuff you can raise 95 per • <f cent, of your chicks until they • fj are 6 weeks old at a cost of 2c • • each. • » • • With this Food Incubator • % Chicks are a Success • • • J Send for our booklet, "Rais- . • • ing Poultry for Profit," and if • • your nearest dealer does not • • keep "Holly Chick Feed" send J • us his name and we will send • • you a 100-lb. sack, freight paid, * • for the regular price—s3.so. • • • : Lilly, Bogardus: : & Company \ • SEATTLE • • • Don't Plant Tomatoes I'ntil you get that little book of directions Llttooys Tomato Culture" telling how to ripen large crops of any va riety of tomatoes —in the field—commercial ly, about Puget Sound or any climate where Ihe potato will grow. How to force ripening (in any section), by culture in the field, from two to three weeks earlier than by ordinary culture. Also NEW RASPBERRY AND BLACKBERRY...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

13 THE HAND SEPARATOR CREAM PROBLEM. The question of hand separation or whole milk factory is at the front in Canada and Dairy Commissioner Rud (Mck discusses the question as follows: "The question of the gathered Cream Creamery vs. the Separator Creamery has provoked a good deal of discussion during the past year or two and many of those who have the wel iaiv of the Canadian butter industry ;tt heart; have viewed with alarm the tendency to convert existing separa tor creameries into gathered cream creameries, ard the growth of new creameries organized in these lines. "There is no inherent reason why the finest of butter canot be made on the cream gathering, plan, and as proof of this we find that some of the cream gathering creameries are able to turn out a first-class article. The fact remains, however, that on the whole the product of the cream-gather ing creameries is inferior to that of the separator creameries, and it will continue to be so until some radical changes are made ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

WOOD'S. The Traveling Grocery Man Sorry , Because He Had a Lively Va- cation There Once. "I find that I am not going to spend my vacation this year at Farmer Hay wood's, up in Pennsylvania, as I did last year." said John Gilbert, the trav eling groceryman, "and I am sorry. "I had a real lively, nice time at die Haywood farm last season. I hadn't been there more than two hours when a couple of jealous pigs got into a fight in the door yard. The farmer's twelve-year-old boy and the nine-year-old son of a neighbor vere playing mumbley-peg in the yard ,;t the time the strife began. They aat on the ground near the well curl). "The battle of the pigs scared the neighbor's boy so that he jumped up, (limbed on the curb, presumably to get to a place of safety, and promptly tumbled over it and into the well, which was fifteen feet deep, with about four feet of water at the bottom. "Farmer Haywood's hoy set Op a yell, and, for tear that no one heard him, let the bucket down into the well, went...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

'4 morning, although anglers were dis tinctly and emphatically warned by many notices posted along it that tres passing on that brook was forbidden and would be punished to the full ex tent of the law, and was whipping it with some success. I could see from the hill not far away, where I was making a feast from the blackberry bushes. . "By and by he heard a rumbling noise behind him. He looked that way and saw Father Haywood's bull com ing for him, head down and, as the bull kept right on, concluded not to try speed with the animal, but shinned up a small chestnut tree at the brook wide. "The bull pawed dirt and roared, and showed no disposition to go away. Owing to the notices on the trees along the brook, the Scranton man, T suppose, did not care to holler for help, but after being kept on his perch for two hours by the bull, whose pa tience was only equalled by his fierce ness, the fisherman evidently con cluded that he would prefer getting caught by the farmer to being treed ind...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

Ship us your KJ.-9S and Wool, Pelts, Furs and Tallo* k SSINOE9 * CO. SEATTLE. "* Send your HIDES FURS. WOOL md PELTS to p. NORTON * CO., SEATTLE" , ,i pullers and Tanners, Higheae Casi f-rioe« '„, R'tnriin ■ AiwW for Zonnlonm HP ■ BIGLOW & CO. COMMISSION MERCHANTS Successors to M. C. Nason & Co. ,it consignments of Fruit and : luce. 801, 803 and 805 Western uue, Seattle, Wash. * J. M. HIXSON & CO., Inc. ! mmission : Merchants ids handled strictly on com ml sal >n". We do „ , iv anything. Consignment!* solicited. Re [',',,-..s made promptly. 12 .23 Western Avenue, . ■ ■ . • SEATTLE MILFOUR, GUTHRIE ft CO, 201-2-3 Bailey Building, Seattle GRAIN DEALERS : Shipping:, Commission Importers of ore bags, bop cloth*, grain bags twine, etc. Balfour Outline «ft Co., Bau Franctn co, Portland, Tacoma, >*v : ■ •■.-• YOUNG Registered GUERNSEY I I CATTLE | FOR SALE ' Three young cows, two with calves dropped in March; four heifers, two f now springing, and three bulls, one ■ two y...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

It) mT There are many reasons why the Improved ■ 1 U. S. SEPARATOR IS THE ONE TO BUY I fl Below are a few of them : \i. , ¥■! f-j • '•■'•""; ' wSA f»J ■¥■■ | m Costs no more than inferior machines ■■ WBL I |b| la Gets More Cream out of the Milk ■ VR ill Li Is less expensive to operate ■ B ■ xflSfs. Increases the quantity MA ;. Aw M »■ Improves the quality wA I IEI Will wear longer M fed 1 I Soons pays for itself mm m| i tW_ Has its gears enclosed 9 m| 1 Bowl has few parts to wash Ma 1 _ Has simple self-emptying Bowl VA Mr § i I Has man other points of superiority IB m I 1 More fully described in our catalogues Lf ■d A&m which are free for the asking, all making |D I The U. S. Separator the Standard Separator of the Worid ■■ ■I I For Western customers, we transfer our separators from Chicago, LaCrosse, Minneapolis, VM Mf Sioux City and Omaha. Address all letters to Mellows Falls, Vt. .. mM |g[ Vermont Farm Machine Co., Bellows Falls^, Vt. 3OS JM For Western trade we transfer our ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

11111 l *."' ' "'^^r^r—:-^^— '~7^^T .* '. ~ " ~'^^^B^B ■' ■ "'^B^B^BBB^p^^^^^f _s£.i~-* 'z~-^~: i ._-.—.—,—.—,. .'. ~~"^^^^^^h|^^^ -■— "^^ ——^^^B^HH ———»-^Mk * ''■ i^^^^Bljjßl * —"-~ '■'" ■ ' *. IT-."*".-':^rßga Vol. XX-No. If A JOURNAL OF THE LAND AND THE HOME IN THE NEW WEST. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, JUNE I, 1903. W. C. BTATT, Secretary and Manager at tb« Noilhwestern Irrigation, Power & Investment Company. Subscription $1 P&r Year Worth Two Gold Dollars

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

1 GOOD BOOKS FOR FARMERS We have carefully compiled the follow ing list of books of best agricultural books, lor the benefit of farmers who want de taiied information on any given subject: ttvery book is by a leading authority, and i In- best of its kind published. These books are sent, postpaid on receipt of price. Ad dress orders to The Hanch, Seattle. CATTLE AND DAIRYING. The Dairyman's Manual. By Henry Stew art. $1.50. Dadd's American Cattle Doctor. By George H. Dadd, M. D. $1.00. Dadd's American Cattle Doctor. By George H. Dadd, V. S. $2.00. Milk : Its Nature and Composition. By C. M. Alkman, M. A., D. Sc. $1.25. Cattle Breeding. By Wm. Warneld. $2.00. Common Sense Ideas for Dairymen. By George 11. Blake. $1.00. Cheese Making—Cheddar. Swiss, Brick, Lim burger, Edam, Cottage. By John VV. Decker. $1.75. Pasteurization and Milk Preservation. By J. H. Monrad. 50 cents. Diseases of Horses and Cattle. By Dr. D. Mclntosh, V. S. $1.75. Milk and Its Products. By Henry H. Wing. $1.00. Ch...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

r tf£RANCh AMtw or mffl fliwHtsi With which Is consolidated i i,e Washington Farmer, The Pacittc Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfmau. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Assocta loii and the State Live Stock Breeders' Associa ion. MILLER FREEMAN. - Editor and Managpr. K.iitorial Offlces: - - - Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1266—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - - - Downs Block, pokane - Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye Subscription (In advance) $ 1.00 per year. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscrip ous. Good commission and salaries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an or .•r to discontinue is received from the subscriber. Ye must be notified in writing, by letter or postal ;ird, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. ;eturulng the paper will not answer, as we cannot i! id It on our list troen the name alone on the pa ,er. We must have both name and address, and ■;l arreara...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

4_ PRES. ROOSEVELT ON ROADS. The tact (hat the nation"s chief ex ecutive attended the National Conven tion at St. Louis and participated in the proceedings indicates the Impor tance which the good roads movement has attained. The tact that the con vention unanimously endorsed the National aid plan also indicates the trend of sentiment in that direction. The President's entrance was sig nalled by cheers from the assembled delegates. He was introduced by Presi dent Moore, of the National Good Roads Association, and spoke as fol lows: "Mr. Chairman. Ladies and Gentle men —When we wish to use descrip tive adjectives fit to characterize great empires and the men who made those empires great, invariably one of the adjectives used is to signify that that empire built good roads. (Applause.) When we speak of the Romans, we speak of them as rulers, as conquerors, as administrators, as road builders. There were empires that rose over night and fell overnight; empires whose influence was absol...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

IRRIGATION IN STEVENS COUNTY. The Important Enterprise Inaugurated by the North wmmtorn Irrigation, Power A Investment Co. Washington is to have a new irri gated district. For years the great productiveness of our irrigated valleys, their surpassing beauty when com pared with the surrounding desolate waste of sage brush, and the absolute certainty of their enormous yield, have been a source of pride to our own resi dents, and a wonder to the many vis itors. Under these circumstances , we hail with great satisfaction any move that will increase the already extensive area of irrigated land. The new irrigated district lies on the eastern slope of the Columbia river in Stevens county. It extends southward from the town of Kettle Falls for a distance of about twenty miles. For the last fifteen years this valley has been recognized as one of the most beautiful in Eastern Washington, and its fertility has long been proven beyond question. The fertile soil has been deposited by the waters o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

6 COSTLY HORTICULTURAL LAW. During the early days, before this state knew better, the horticultural board got in its graft on the treasury for from $5,000 to $10,000 per annum. There was a board of five horticultural commissioners. They each drew a fair salary and expense money on their junketing trips. At that time the vari ous fruit pests were just beginning to make their advent in this country, and these learned horticulturists were most valorous in their efforts to check their spread. The political upheaval of '96 ousted the choice cluster of five from their berths; whereupon members of the board pointed out to the State Horticultural Association that there was no need for more than one commissioner a-nyway. The law, upon the recommenda tion of that organization, was accordingly changed at the following session of the leg islature, so that the fruit growers in each county could have a fruit inspector ap pointed should they so desire. The state commissioner received $1,000 per an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

THE BORDEN CO.'S CUT-THROAT POLICY. The condensed milk plant of the Borden Company at Auburn, is rapidly nearing com pletion. It is the intention to force the Pa cific Coast Milk Company out of business by over-bidding them for the milk of White river valley, and underselling them on manu factured goods. Possibly the Borden Com pany will succeed in killing off competition, but it will be only after a long hard fight, and a very heavy expenditure. The Pacific (Oast Milk Company may not have the cap ital behind it that the eastern company has, but it is well intrenched in the way of back ing, with fine wholesale connections, and has a firm hold with consumers. We are in formed that Manager Stuart has made long time contracts with milk dealers in the White river valley, sufficient to insure a good supply of milk—and in addition he has recently erected two other factories, the one at Forest Grove, Ore., particularly, being a very large, modern plant in a splendid dairy district. The Bor...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

6 Horticultural Notes By F. Walden It is said to be a wise man who can learn valuable lessons from misfortune. In the present case 1 will at least play the role of a wise man. On the night of May 6th we had a severe freeze that did considera ble damage to the fruit crop in places. We suffered considerably. Our peach crop was lost. We would have had from 8,000 to io.(xh) boxes of peaches if they had not been injured. As it is, we will not have more than two or three hundred boxes. The rea son I am relating this is for the lesson we can derive from this misfortune. We are not worrying over our loss, for such things are to be expected. No man should ever become discouraged in fruit-raising be cause he sometimes has a loss. The way to look at the matter is: Does fruit growing pay after all these losses are counted out? It does, and that is the main thing- to be considered. But the lesson I want to draw from this circumstance is this: My neigh bor who lives on the adjoining ranch, and wh...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

PEAR BLIGHT. While scientists and theorists, apiarists „,1 non-apiarists arc giving forth wisdom ',„ the vexed question of pear blight, one act remains which is admitted by all and j n t is that a vigorous wood growth is con ducive of the health of the disease (pardon he expression!) Therefore, to cheek this v ood growth should be the aim of the pear rrower. This he can do in various ways to the surrunding conditions and ho age of the trees. In California, where here are no summer rains, and irrigation s optional, this is a simple matter. Stop ultivating. or do only so much as will ,c necessary to keep the trees alive. In tead of plowing the pear orchard, run the isc over it in the spring before the weeds row too high, and let that suffice. It is well known that pear-blight or fire blight has existed in this country for more han a hundred years, and also that it is 1 disease of a more or less spasmodic na lure. These very facts show the absurdity ,f blaming the bee for the spread of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

zo MANAGEMENT OF BULL HERDS. S\> many fine bulls are ruined by improper treatment and feeding that R tow practical hints in this depart ment of the paper should prove of value to our readers. In the first place it should be understood that the I",rocreativo powers of an animal are restricted and that they are not at all ages of life uniform. For this reason while a young animal is growing and developing his frame he should not be expected to procreate to the same extent as his full-grown brother. Al though this is the case we see year lings and two-year-olds doing full ser vice and such youngsters are more apt than older bulls to overdo themselves by repeated service. The work of the growing animal should be restrict ed and he should not be allowed to run with cows or serve a cow more than once. In the case of a yearling it is wisest not to allow service at all, but it this can not be avoided then he should have not to exceed ten cows, and these are best allowed in a short time, ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

HOLLY CHICK! FEED! The cheapest feed for little • I chicks. • • BECAUSE: • With this food and plenty of • green stuff you can raise 95 per • cent, of your chicks until they • are 6 weeks old at a cost of 2c • • each. J • With this Food Incubator • • • I Chicks are a Success • • • Send for our booklet, "Rais- • ing Poultry for Profit," and if • « your nearest dealer does not • • keep "Holly Chick Feed" send J • us his name and we will send • J you a 100-lb. sack, freight paid, * • for the regular price—s3.so. • : Lilly, Bogardus : & Company j • SEATTLE • • • ••••••••••••••••••••eeee«* Don't Plant Tomatoes Until you get that little book of directions "Lfttooys Tomato Culture" telling how to ripen large crops of any va riety of tomatoes—in the field —commercial- ly, about Puget Sound or any climate where the potato will grow. ■' How to force ripening (in any section), by culture in the field, from two to three weeks earlier than by ordinary culture. . Also NEW RASPBERRY AND BLACKBE...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1903

12 STUDEBAKER ORDERS. The sales recently made by the Chi cago house of the Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co. show which way the wind is setting with big concerns that are satisfied with nothing short of the best to be had in vehicles and harness. The first was to the Yellowstone Park Transportation Co., the concessionar ies under the Government of the trans portation privileges in the Yellowstone National Park, who have some 800 head of horses in service. Some time ago this company ordered from Stude bakers a few sets of harness, and hav ing tested and compared them with other makes used by them, quickly followed with an order for fifty sets of four-in-hand harness. The order ■was placed expressly on the superior quality of the Studebaker goods. The other sale was to the W. C. Walch & Co., of Chicago, and consisted of sixty United States Mail wagons and sixty sets of harness to go into the Gov ernment mail service and to be made after the approved Government de signs and specifications....

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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