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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Eastern Agricultural Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Eastern Agricultural Notes. Utilizing Vine PiirxiNGS. —Some of our Eastern grape-growers are utilizing the new wood pr'tmings of the vino for wine and vinegar manufacture. After being out small they are bruised and put into a vat or mashing tub, and boiling water poured on them, in the same way as done with malt. One of the experimenters says that they produce liquor of a fine vinious quality, which on being fermented, makes a very fine beverage, either mild or strong, as you please, and on being distilled, produces an excellent spirit of the nature of brandy. In the course of his experiments he found that the fermented liquor from the pruning, particularly the tendrils, when allowed to pass the vinious and to run into the acetous fermentation makes uncommonly line vinegar. A Lowell man has built a henery large enough to accommodate 3,000 hens. The refuse potato pomace from starch factories is now to be made into paper. Illinois and lowa stand nt the head of the wheat-growing States...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Popular Lectures. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Popular Lectures.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Evaporation and Rain Fall. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Evaporation and Rain Fall. [Prof. John LkOontk before the Mechanic Arts ColLSOB, Mechanics' Institute Hall, S. F. Beported expressly for the Peesh.] The subject of r,ain is of so much importance to the farmers on our coast, that we give a few extracts bearing on the matter from Prof. John Le Conte's last lecture before the Mechanic Arts College, in this city: 1 stated, said the professor, that air was not the agent of evaporation, and that these two theories founded on the ideas that air WBfl a solvent and that it was an absorbent of vapor, were erroneous. I showed, moreover, that in vacuum evaporation takes place instantaneously; that the vapor has ii certain elastic force which we measure by the distance through which it depresses the meroury in our tube; and that an inoreaae of temperature causes an increase of thfs force, although not in the same ratio. Now there is a certain density or elastic force beyond which a vapor cannot pass. In a given space, only a certain amount of va...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CABINET OF NATURAL HISTORY IN ALAMEDA COUNTY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

CABINET OF NATURAL HISTORY IN ALAMEDA COUNTY. [Written for the Press.] Editors Press —There are a few men in this world who find pleasure in devoting their time and talents to science and natural history. Not always averse to society, they are never leaders in it, and generally move along in a quiet, unobtrusive and modest manner, neither attracting the observations of the common people, nor being attracted by the ordinary or frivolous excitements of the day. Such men are generally linked together by congeniality of tastes into a sort of social union; but it seems to bo a peculiarity with many of them to rather seclude themselves, even from each other, so far as social communion is concerned. Their ambition is more to learn than to be seen. We venture the assersion that there is not a better, nobler or more useful class of men and women in this world than such as these, who find food for thought in the forms, ways and mysteries of Nature; who enjoy the book of knowledge that opens l...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE STATE UNIVERSITY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

THE STATE UNIVERSITY. The Board of Begents met on Monday, principally to settle indebtedness incurred lately. Bills, amounting to $4,616.34, were ordered paid, and others, amounting to $13,185.61, were ordered paid when approved by the proper committees. The Board adopted a resolution offering, in effect, to pay $20,000 cash for the Brayton Estate instead of $22,000 in interest-bear- ing bonds payable in 10 years. Besolutions were also adopted, giving Mr. George Tait the title of Assistant Professor of Ancient Languages, empowering this gentleman to employ such assistants as have been authorized by the Board for the Fifth Class, during the present term; also providing for permanent instructors in this class. The construction of the University building is to be stopped, as this has cost more than was estimated. A compromise was effected with the contractor who was to furnish the bricks, and from to-day on all work is to be suspended. We are to wait, then, an indefinite period of time...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. We invite our readers to enter and inspect our new Country Residence, which wo have just erected as a model of neatness, beauty and cheapness combined. We think they will be pleased with the arrangement. They run lure look over our library, ever on the increase, of Mechanical and Scientific Progress, and then read the travels of our correspondent from Omaha to Chicago, and thoße of him who writes of Agriculture and Manufactures in San Joaquin County. Dr. Thomas, formerly President of the Vacaville College, treats us to a very interesting discourse on the History and Progress of Farming, and we are told of the Silk and Fish Interests in Napa. Visiting, then, the Apiary, we witness the proceedings of the "busy bee," and see sonic new food for these little insects. We see a New Grape near by, which has just been imported into our vineyard. We converse on the Profits of Beet Sugar Manufacture, and are given soint interesting statistics, and this subject natural!* leads ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Wanted. —Copies of No. 2of the Pacific Rural Press, dated Jan. 14, 1871. Persons having that No. to spare will oblige by sending it to this office. We are not able to supply all orders for it. The demand for our new paper has exceeded our most sanguine expectations. The Money Market. —The price of gold opened in New York, on Wednesday, at 110%. Legal Tenders 91@91 > 4 'c. Money in San Francisco is in good supply for mercantile purposes at 1(5*1% per cent., and on long terms 10(oj12 per cent. The quantity of money now flowing into the public institutions for employment is increasing, and the prospects for the year in this respect are good.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SPRING AND WINTER WHEAT—THE DIFFERENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

SPRING AND WINTER WHEAT—THE DIFFERENCE. All plants are more or less influenced by climate, habits of growth, and the mode of treatment to which they are subjected. The intelligent orchardist, in selecting his fruit trees will, as a general rule, choose from such as have been grown as nearly as possible under inthesamecircumstamvs of soil and climate as those to which he expects to e\2>ose them in their future growth. The only variation from this rule should bo -that for trees whose natural habitat is in a warmer latitude, he should seek his supply a little south, or where it is somewhat warmer than at his own location. If he desires trees that are natives of a colder region, he should go a little north, or where it ia colder for his stock. The same rule holds good in roots, vegetables, etc. Our grains are also more or less influenced in the same way, and it is to this \>veuliarity wo owe the difference which exists between Winter and Spring Grain. Any spring wh...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
WHAT WE WANT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

WHAT WE WANT. We want our readers, and especially our practical and progressive fanning readers, to put themselves in communication with us, and send us reports of progress, of experiments, etc. We would like to hear of the best crops of grain, of vegetables, of fruit, and learn how they were produced. We want to know how much such and such crops have cost, and how much profit has been realized from them. We want to hear what experiments have been made, and the results which have attended BUOh efforts. Such information spread before the people, through the columns of the BUBAL, will do much good, and greatly encourage and improve our agricultural intercuts generally. We are especially desirous to hear from experiments in diversified farming —of efforts to turn our wheat lands, at least in part, to a more profitable culture. We would also like to hear of improvements in wheat culture. Who, by a change in his mode of culture, by drilling, perhaps, instead of broadcast sowing; by deepe...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PROSPERITY TO THE FARMER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

PROSPERITY TO THE FARMER. Everybody, in town, city and country, is just now rejoicing in the prosperity which the late rains are sure % to bring to tho farmer and to the miner. Prosperity to these two classes implies and carries with it prosperity to all. Of no other vocations can this remark be made with ec^ual truth and force. On the contrary, in regard to many others the opposite is tnae. Stockjobbers and speculators make their wealth mostly out of the losses of others, and not unfrequently by means carefully devised to that end. There are many others, also, who make their fortunes from the misfortunes of their neighbors. But not so with the men who carve out their fortune! and win competence by the culture of the soil, or by delving still deeper into the earth, in search of thepreoioui or useful metals and minerals. Nobody is ever made poorer by their prosperity; on the contrary the great mass?s are improved, enriched and spurred onward by the example and material results of the...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A NEW SILK PROJECT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

A NEW SILK PROJECT. Wo have been shown a letter wherein a tract of some 13,000 acres of land, at the Mission San Jose, is offered for sale at #400,000; the project being for tho establishment tLero of >an extensive silk producing and silk manufacturing establishment. The mover in this mattor is Joseph Newman, tho pioneer silk manufacturer of this state, who proposes to organize a company to make tho purchase, and start the operation, which will be conducted on the co-operative plan. Mr. Newman assures us that quite a number of capitalists have already expressed their willingness to take hold of the enterprise, and he fools confident that he shall soon bo able to secure the additional amount required to place the scheme in a shape to commence operations. The capital stock proposed is $500,000, in shares of $100 each, giving $100,000 for a working capital. The plan is to purchase the above mentioned tract, to build tenements on the same for tho benefit of the operatives emp...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Agriculture.. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

California Agriculture..

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE FOR 1870. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

REPORT OP THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE FOR 1870. Through tho courtesy of the Secretary, Maj. Beck, we are enabled to commence the publication of the Beport of the State Board of Agriculture for 1870, this week. We shall continue its publication next Aveek, and shall also giAre our readers the full proceedings of the State Agricultural Society at the annual meeting AvhicliAvas held at Sacramento yesterday. We ask the farmers of the State to give the report a careful perusal. To the members of the Slate Agricultural Society — Gentlemen:—ln presenting to you our annual report at this time we feel no little pride and satisfaction in being able to say that the State Agricultural Society, the management of which has been entrusted to our care, was never in a more pi-osperous condition, financially and otherwise, than at present. A comprehensive statement of the transactions of the Board for the past year, the present position and wants of tho society, together with some recommendations ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE OUR LADY EDITORS

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SAVED BY A SHADOW. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

SAVED BY A SHADOW. NELL VAN [Written for the PXEM.] Twenty years ago San Francisco was occupied by a very different class of people from those who now tread its streets. Among them were adventurers from every clime. Some had left comfortable homes and good business prospects, from a desire to grow suddenly rich ; while others craved novelty, tired of the monotonous sound of counting house duties and mercantile pursuits. A goodly sprinkling of gamblers and world's idlers swelled the tide, and even emigrants from Botany Bay —ex-eon-viota ("Sidney Ducks," as they were then called) elbowed their way among the throng, -with consequential air. As yet but few women were bold enough to venture so far beyond the proscribed limits of civilization, and in consequence many a manly heart smothered its tendereat emotions, and sighed for the companionship so much needed. Tobacco smoke issuing from hundreds of living chimneys rendered the atmosphere both stifling and irritating to even healthy bein...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SCATTER SEEDS OF KINDNESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

SCATTER SEEDS OF KINDNESS. Let us gather up the sunbeams Laying all around our path; Lei us keep the wheat and roses. Casting out the thorns and chaff; Let us tind our sweetest comfort In the blessings of to-day, With a patient hand removing All the briars from the way. Strange we never prize the music, Till the sweet-voioed bird has flown; Strange that we should slight the violets, Till the lovely flowers are gone! Strange that summer skies and sunshine Never seem one-half so fair, As when winter's snowy pinions Shake the white down in the air. If we knew the baby fingers, I'nssed against the window pane, Would be cold and stiff to-morrow — Never trouble us again—■ Would the bright eye of our darling Catch the frown upon our brow? Would the print of rosy fingers Vex us then as they do now? Ah! those little ice-cold lingers, How they point our memories back To the hasty words and actions Strewn along our backward track! How those little hands remind us, As in snowy grace they lie, N...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
UP COUNTRY LETTERS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

UP COUNTRY LETTERS. [Written for the Pbkm.] Dsab Bsapkb.- -Did you ever take a long ride in sonic heavy vehicle, OV6? stony pavements, until the rambling and jolting seemed to have become a part of you ? and a sudden stop made you instinctively feel yourself, to see if all were with you, or you had indeed lost the top of your head? Just so it seems to me, now, after a three months run of the typhoid fever, in your city, to lind myself in this quiet, cosy nest, up country; among cheerful, kindly faces, honest hearts, and willing hands; where the music of barnyard fowls and cattle is teeming with health and beauty to my ears! And sitting in the warm sunshine, on the porch, 1 lay back my head, relax every muscle, and dreamingly wonder if this is indeed I —out of the dim sick room, at last! breathing God's pure sunshine and air once more. Lazily I watch the men going and coining from work in the fields; see their stalwanl forms, broad chests and deep breathing. Vet how unconscious they ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DRESSING BABIES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

DRESSING BABIES. [Written for the Piif.sk.] Mothers, why will you insist on dressing your babies in the most inconvenient, expensive, unhealthy, and unbecoming way you can possibly invent ? It is extraordinary to me that they must have shirts liko gossamer with no sleeves but loose, no warmth nor comfort, only a band to muss up, get in a wad and hurt the delicate skin of baby. Then two flannel petticoats with double rows of pins, a dress long enough for its mother, whose weight baby is expected to carry about to keep its feet warm ! The only really sensible article of clothing is the knit sack which mothers find easier to put on and keep on, than a blanket. Poor baby ! The mother must keep it in the fashion if it is cold and uncomfortable. She gets the patterns from Mrs. Lofty— and so they must be the thing. Now let me give you my idea of what baby would like to wear if it was consulted. The first two months a nice soft flannel band, without any hem to hurt the delicate skin, saved ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
WHERE IS YOUR BOY AT NIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

WHERE IS YOUR BOY AT NIGHT. The practice of allowing your boys to spend their evenings in the streets, is one of the most ruinous, dangerous and mischievous things possible. Nothing more speedily marks their course downward. They acquire, under the cover of night, an unhealthy state of mind, vulgar and profane language, obscene practices, criminal sentiments, and a lawless, riotous bearing. Indeed, it is in the streets, after nightfall, that boys generally acquire the education and capacity of becoming rowdy, dissolute men. — Watpktnon, And, in all probability, nine-tenths of the criminals in our state prisons an 1 caused by the loose 1 manner in which parental and mothers in particular, bring up their boys. Their home duties occupy their time and thoughts, or society claims their entiro life, and boys are troublesome and in the way. Home is not made attractive to the boys, so they run the streets all day, and as they grow older, far into the nights too, without restraint from eithe...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Household Reading. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Household Reading.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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