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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HORSE NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

HORSE NOTES. Sunlight is the foe of disease. Let it flood your stables. Have an aim in breeding and breed all colts to a standard. A farmer should never buy his working horses. He should breed them. They can be bred at a profit. Keep your horses so well curried that if a fly were to alight on them it would slip off and break its neck. A horse that is gentle and safe un der all conditions is easily worth three times as much as one of equal ability that cannot be trusted. When buying a horse look for width between the eyes, a large brain, a pleasant look out of the eyes, and a fine coat of hair. When all failed, we have known cases of colic to respond to quarter pound doses of Epsom salts in warm water. How would you like it if a big po liceman were to give you a kick or a clout on the ear every time some thing startles you? And yet that would be as reasonable as it is to jerk and whip a horse when he is startled. iThe most profitable horse to have on the farm is a go.od brood mare. S...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FAMOUS BRITISH REGIMENTS. Honors of the Royal Munster Fusiliers. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

FAMOUS BRITISH REGIMENTS. Honors of the Royal Munster Fusiliers. One of the bravest deeds of the war was the heroic action of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, who, mustering only two companies, dragged a num ber of horseless guns to safety, whilst under a murderous fire from 3000 entrenched Germans. This is not the first occasion on which the battle fields of France have seen valiant work by the Munsters. As far back as the days of the Stuarts the regi ment fougth. many good fights on the fair fields of the Continent, when for sheer love of fighting they joined the troops of the King of France. This action has never been forgotten by the French, and to-day the Irish sol dier is always sure of a popular wel come amongst our Allies. With other Irish units the regiment was first founded for the purpose of guarding the ordnance of the Army at the time of James II., for artillery rapidly followed the invention of gunpowder. Being armed with a wea pon known as the "fusil," the regi ment were ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FAT MAN. A Frenchman's Heroic Deed. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

THE FAT MAN. 9 A Frenchman's Heroic Deed. J | Paul was sitting on a low chair in the kitchen watching Annette. An nette sat on the kitchen table swing ing her pretty ankles. Paul was always watching Annette in a dumb, devoted, dog-like way. Paul would ihave married Annette, but when he had asked her she had laughed at him. "You!" she had exclaimed. "You are too fat." Though Paul was only thirty-four he was ponderous—he was enormous. So Annette had married Pierre— Pierre, who was little and brown and wiry. They had been talking of the war, and Pierre, twisting his fierce little moustache, had laughed. "Ma foi, Paul," he had chuckled, "if they call us up—you and I—and we march to gether against these Prussians, I shall put you in front; they will never hit me then." Annette laughed, and Paul laughed. Paul and Pierre were called up, and marched side by side. And, alas! they were ceaselessly marching away from the frontier. They were two little atoms in that seemingly never ending retre...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER IX. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

CHAPTER IX. Margaret looked so ill and so I wretched that her mother impatient-1 ly decided to send her out of town' for a week. ' His girl's white cheeks and sad I eyes depressed Sir John terribly. He •was far more tender than his wife, for although he had fallen in with her wishes he had to confess to him self that it went very much against the grain to impose such hard condi tions on these two young people who evidently loved one another so dear ly. It was Dolly who had put the idea ; into her mother's mind of sending her sister away. "Meg is simply dying to get hack to the Cloisters," the younger girl had said. "Why don't you let her have a week down there, motLer, then she | will he looking all right in time for my wedding." The suggestion appeared a good one to Lady Alicia, although she was angrily impatient with her elder girl. So Margaret and Spence were pack ed off in a motor-car and the girl could sit and dream, and weep, and j let her hopes drive away her sorrow J as free...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HER EVER-READY IMPLEMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

HER EVER-READY IMPLEMENT. What the jack-knife is to the boy, the hairpin is to the girl—it is her every-ready implement. She has no pocket suitable for carrying a jack knife, but her plaits or coils furnish abundant room for stowing away a few extra hairpins, and it is the hand iest thing in the world to take them out, use them, and return them. What does she do with them? But tons lier shoes and her gloves, uses them for hooks, safety-pins, and or dinary pins, if the original articles are not at hand; fastens her pictures to the walls, adjusts her curtains, se cures her window in whatever posi tion she wishes, renders the lock of her door burglar proof by thrusting a hairpin into it, or, if she has lost her key or lent it, picks the lock, mends broken hinges, repairs her parasol, secures an awkward bundle, and by bending and twisting them makes more liandy things than a car penter could get into a tool-chest. Girls are very inventive.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUNSET AND DAWN CHAPTER VIII. (Continued). [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

SUNSET AND DAWN By EFFIE ADELAIDE ROWLANDS. (Published by arrangement with Ward, Lock & Co. Ltd., Lon. & Melb.) All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER VIII. (Continued). As he went away,. Marcus sat gloomily in his car. He was more ihan ever convinced that he must speak out and approach Rachel Duch eron. The suggestion that there were other people in her life about whom he knew nothing startled and alarmed him. It had been the fact of Leah's isolation which had given him a sense of so much security. Be sides, he not unnaturally supposed that Madame Ducheron must have known what was likely to happen where he was concerned. For, other wise, she would never have allowed him to move so intimately in her life, never have confided in him so much. Of course, she was not aware of how largely Vinsen had encroached on that intimacy and confidence; still, the fact remained that be was the only one who had ever been invited to her home or who had been brought in contact with Leah. "Yes, I...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE Grenville Standard. PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed and published by HUBERT ALFRED ADAMS Sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, Olyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, FEB. 27, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed and published by lIcnEBT Alfred Arams Sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Greuville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in tlie State of Victoria. Registered at the Genera! Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, FEB. 27, 1915. The slump in recruiting in Victoria may please the Peace Society cranks,-but those who went to see Australia repre sented at the Front by a big army will not rejoice. The aforesaid cranks think that this war will positively be the last. The notion is that Germany will be crushed, and that no other nation will j then want any big armaments. An idyllic period will follow, during which the Australian fleet will be stripped of its guns and used for picnic excursions. One of the mauy flaws in the forecast is the circumstance that Germany, no matter how badly beaten, will still exist as a Power. Britain could not allow her to be completely wiped out, even if the other European nations were willi...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Skipton News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

Two applications have been received from medical men in reply to this town ship's advertisement for a resident doc tor. One asks for a guarantee of £600 per annum ; the other for £900. A meeting- is to be held on Saturday night to consider the applications ; but at the prices asked there is very little prospect of either of the applicants getting the job Surveyors are engaged laying out the railway station works on the new site. Other than this, there is very little doing in connection with the line. The sports committee met on Satur day night, and drew up the program for Easter Monday. The prize money is limited this year to £40. There was considerable difference of opinion on sev eral matters that had to be settled, two amendments, for instance, being tabled as to the time of starting the cycle road race and sports. The majority decided in favor of 11 and 12 o'clock respect ively. It was proposed to have local talent for the concert, but an amendment was carriod to engage, as form...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ARE WE DOWNHEARTED?—NO! [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

ARE WE DOWNHEARTED?—NO! By bridge and battery, town and trench, They're fighting with bulldog pluck; ; ! Not one, from Tommy to General French, Is down upon his luck. There are some who stand and some who fall, But how does the chorus go— That echoing chant in the hearts of all?' ■,* "Are we downhearted?—No!"'^ There's Jack, God bless him, upon the foam, His isn't an easy task. 'To strike for England, to strike right home, So much, 110 more, does he ask. On the Dreadnought's deck where the big guns bark, Or in quiet depths below— The salt wind wafts us a chantey. Hark! "Are we downhearted?—No!" And what of the girl who is left be hind, And the wife who misses her mate? Oh, well, we've got our business to mind, Though it's only to watch and wait. So we'll take what comes with a gal lant heart As we busily knit and sew, Trying, God help us, to do our part. "Are we downhearted?—No!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SIGNS OF RURAL PROSPERITY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

SIGNS OF RURAL PROSPERITY. When the people of any locality take pains to have their farms look ing trim and nice to folks who pass along the road, you may look for a prosperous neighborhood. The neighborhood where all the crops are well and seasonably cared for is a prosperous neighborhood. Another sign is a herd of well-bred, well-fed cows. If these cows are all of one particular breed, it makes one all the more certain that ho is right in thinking the folks are doing well. Paint on the houses goes with prosperity. Tumbling - down and i weather-beaten buildings are a pretty sure indication that things are not going-just as they should. If quite a number of clean and instruct ive papers and magazines come to the local post-office regularly, you may be almost positive that things are flourishing in that district. A reading people usually means a happy and prosperous people. Where all kind of farm work stops on Saturday night, and the folks hitch up and drive to church the nest day, y...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Straight Tip. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

The Straight Tip. Old Farmer Brown trudged up to the parsonage to pay his tithe-money, and, like most people who have to stump up cash for taxes, lie was not particularly cheerful about it. How ever, as it had got to be done he de termined to bear it, even if he did not grin in the attempt. He was shown into the dining-room, where the parson's wife was enter taining a noble company of ladies to high tea, and sat on the edge of the chair, twiddling his hat and awaiting the pleasure of the parson. "Ah, Mr. Brown," said Mrs. Parson sweetly, beaming upon the old boy in her best patronisnig manner, "and how's farming?" "Farming, ma'am?" replied the soil tiller unenthusiastically. "Well, farming's all right, ma'am. I've got thirteen calves, but one on 'em seems rather poorly. He don't take his vit tles well somehow." "Oh!" said the vicaress. "And what does the poor thing do?" "Do?" queried Farmer Brown. "He does what I'm a-doing now—sits down and watches t'others feed!" "Why do you call y...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HORSES AND THEIR HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

HORSES AND THEIR HEALTH. The horse is a strict vegetarian and the most particular animal about the quality of his food known in domestic life. His taste and sense of smell are acute, and he will almost starve and famish before he will partake of tainted food or water. He is a crea ture of strong muscles, and shows a -constitution of iron when put to tests of endurance, but for all these quali ties he is a delicate physical make up in certain ways, and easily upset in health by ill-treatment. Heat him up and .let him stand unhoused or in a draught, a>nd pneumonia, or at least a bad cold, will result; nag and bully him, and he will steadily lose flesh, no matter how fully kept fed up; work him immediately after a hearty meal, and he is liable to indigestion and c.olic; give him poor care, and he will prove weak in the performance of his duties, and his useful life will be shortened. In an inverse ratio, the delicacy no ted in him will turn just as quickly in response to good treatm...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ADMIRATION THAT CAUSED TROUBLE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

ADMIRATION THAT CAUSED TROUBLE. M. Anatole France, the famous French author, has, to his great re gret, been refused for service as a pri vate in the French army on the ground that he is too old. A short time ago M. France had an amusing although embarrassing ex perience owing to the attentions of a young lady admirer of his books. The author was staying at an hotel in a little country place, and the lady, who was not known to him personally, sent him a magnificent bouquet of flowers. Through a silly freak she addressed it to ''Monsieur Bergeret," the name of a character in one of M. France's novels. When the bouquet arrived, the proprietor of the hotel refused to take it in, saying that there was no "Monsieur Bergeret" staying in his house. Just as the messenger was about to go away with the flow ers, M. France happened to stroll up, and overhearing the conversation, he said with a smile to the hotel pro prietor, "I am 'M. Bergeret.' " "Oh," thought the proprietor, "this must be a ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Possibly So. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

Possibly So. Hill: Shorte has sold a poem enti i tied "Ode to a Fair Lady." Hall: Has he? Well, he is more competent to write verses entitled "Owed to a Landlady." Fa. her: Do you think I ought to have my daughter's voice cultivated? Absent-minded Visitor; I should think you ought to have something clone for it. Young Stone: I spoke to the chem ist, and he advised me that I should Doctor (interrupting): Oh, he gave you some idiotic advice, I suppose? Stone: He advised me to see you. Just do things and do not talk about them. This is the great secret of success in all enterprises. Talk ■mea-ns discussion, discussion means irritation, irritation means opposition, and opposition means hindrance al ways. whether you are right or wrong. The only nephew was arduously en gaged in showing his rural hut weal thy aunt "the sights." A comic opera was on the programme for one of the evenings and the vo\mg man took his aunt. No sooner had the curtain gone up than the lady grasped her nephew's ar...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Genius. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

The Genius. Mother: Oh, doctor, I really don't know what to do with myself. I am so upset. My child has had whooping cough, measles, mumps, and when I come home this afternoon, I find him ill again. Doctor: The boy's a genius. Mother: A genius? Doctor: Yes; infinite capacity for taking pains.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Professional Rivals. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

Professional Rivals. Dave Gibson lias a lot of stories to tell about the keen rivalries between small Indiana newspapers twenty-five years ago. Some of the stuff printed was pretty raw, personalities were in dulged in, atLd editors went armed. In one town there were two papers, the "Banner" and the "Standard." Here ' is a part of a local story from the "Standard": — | A greasy, grimy hobo named James | A. McPherson wandered into . our | office yesterday. He claimed that he was formerly a resident of this town and that while he was here he had worked for a living. This seemed a j remarkable statement, so we had our > reporter interview him. "You say you used to live in Bung town?" asked the reporter. "Yes," answered the tramp; "many of the happiest moments of my life were spent here." "What was your business, Mr. Mc Pherson?" "I was a reporter on the "Banner.'" "To what do you attribute your re markable rise in the world since then?" 1

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

Pharmaceutical 310 STURT ST., BALLARAT. Next Lester's Hotel. All Prescriptions and Orders Receive Utmost Despatch. A Large Stock of Everything in a Chemist's Shop Kept. 1661EII 1 ill! I 11111 I Absolutely Painless Extractions. All Sets Guaranteed to Fit and Work. No Fit, no Pay. Written Guarantee Given, so if one get Good Goods, one should be contented to pay, and if not, you are protected by guarantee. The above design makes an attractive looking home and if you will send us a rough sketch showing the number and size of the rooms you require, we will prepare a plan and estimate free of cost to you. We can save 37ou money ; our material is first quality, and the whole job will be built and finished in a thoroughly workmanlike manner. F, MfiHg ©reswiek Rd., [; B&flarat. i $ e '"i $ I /r*v\f>ipTp §V1b% Chaiies §?oek, of 42 East Brunswick, who for 33 ycairs has filled ara im porta rot position In the IVBeEbowrirse Tramway and O-C Company, writes this letters. which other ©ff...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MIKADO'S WRESTLING MATCH. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

THE MIKADO'S WRESTLING MATCH. The Mikado of Japan, whose sub jects have been doing go much to help the Allies in the present "war, is a thorough soldier, and has a wonder ful knowledge of military tactics and history. When he was quite a boy, he was' induced by his father, the late Emperor, to take a keen interest in the principles of national . defence. He was taught wrestling and was made to try his prowess with young men in the humblest walks of life. On one occasion, he was present with his father at a big wrestling tournament and took part in many of the matches. He threw all of his op ponents until there stepped into the ring a young farmer's son of such a burly build that it was evident that the future Mikado would have a very rough time of it. However, he went manfully to work, but was heavily beaten, and had to confess that the farmer's son was victor. After the match, the late Emperor sent for the umpire, and, pointing to the farmer's son who was feeling rather uncomfortab...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling and Motor Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

Iii America bad roads have forced [ motor cycle manufacturers to equip their j machines with large sized tyres, and in this country the difference in the sizes of covers fitted to England aud> Americuti machines respectively is most marked. The average road in this country calls for tyres with larger air space than is usually provided for in English tyres, made to sail English conditions. Motor cyclists are now be ginning to realise that bigger tyres are essential to comfortable and economical motoring on our roads. In this respect the Dunlop Rubber Co. specialises on big covers, supplying large sized tyres that are made to withstand rough riding on rough roads. In a fine 82 page catalogue this Company illustrates all the various sizes oE motor cycle covers, now made by them, in addition to giv ing valuable information relative to the selection and care of tyres. A oopy may be had for the asking from any of the Dunlop Depots. An important sporting event in -the 100 miles Canberra...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Nasty. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

Nastv. "I celebrate my twenty-fourth birth day to-morrow." "Indeed! And isn't it singular? So do I!" "Oh, but I celebrate mine for the first time." ~ The following is a really good story, but few people will believe it because the blacksmith was a Scotch- i man: — .1 An English party once explored Bannoclcburn, and had the field of bat tle pointed out to them by the local blacksmith, who carefully avoided any allusion which could wound Eng lish susceptibilities. On parting, the tourists offered him a crown piece for his trouble, but he declined with a proud smile. - "Excuse me, gentlemen," he said; "the English have paid too dearly al ready for Banmockburn!" It was the kindly custom in the vil lage for the well-to-do inhabitants to make good any loss which the vil lagers might sustain through the death of any live-stock. The retired manufacturer who had only recently settled in the village was ignorant of this laudable proceeding, and was I considerably puzzled by the visit of a lab...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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