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Title: Hawkesbury Advocate Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,586 items from Hawkesbury Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Height of Bien. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Height of Men. A study of the military records of Europe proves that in 1610 the average height of man was 5ft. 9in. During the following one hnndred years this average decreased to 5ft. 7½in. In 1790 the average was only 5ft. 6in., and In 1820 it was but 5ft 51n. At the present time it is but 5ft 3½in. It is an easy matter to deduce statistics from the above figures   to prove that human stature is gradually on the decline. Figuring upwards, using the same ratio, we find that Adam's sons and neighbours averaged 16ft 9in. in height, and at the opening of the Chris- tian era the averaged height was a frac- tion over 9ft Looking into the dim future, we can see a time only 2000 years hence when human stature will be re- duced to an average of only 15In. The Prince and Princess of Wales took   their daughters to see " The Strange   Adventures of Miss Brown" at theVaude-   ville. That is the advantage of having   a farce th...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Indoor Gowns. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Indoor Gowns. The newest Paris models for smart in- door gowns are very simple, yet most charming, and they introduce some of the most attractive features of the Marie Antoinette gown. Many such dresses are being prepared for trousseaux, while others, less gay, and made of certain rich materials, are appropriate for dignified wemen of middle age. The new flowered silks and velvets form parts of trousseau dresses in combination with a plain fabric, velvet, satin, or wool. There are chine flowered silks and others of bro cade, each being harmonious for this style of dress. The printed velvets are also used, in coloured grounds with leaves and blossoms of natural tint print ed upon them. Fnacy figured silks or the new velvets are employed for the waist of the dress, a short Louis XVI. coat, or belted basque, the basque usually added under the rib- bon belt, and made very full and pleated, the basque opens on a corselet or wide belt front, reaching up to the bust, fitted by darts, and i...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Household Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Household Hints   A very good knlfeboard may be made by getting; a piece of wood the size of a   knife-board and stretching a piece of old   carpet over the wood, nailing it down firmly round the edges. A very good way to test whether sheets   are damp or not is to place an ordinary tumbler between the sheets for a little while, and if the bed is damp traces of moisture will appear on the inside of   the glass.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To Preserve Fresh Fruit. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

To Preserve Fresh Fruit.   Experiments are being tried in pre-   serving fresh fruit in borax. It has   been found perfectly successful with   cherries, and is now being tried with vegetables. It is anticipated that should results be favourable a borax bin will form part of the household equipment of every family in which fruit, vegetables, and other perishable forms of food can constantly be kept. Borax can be used over and over again, so that economy is   secured in a double fashion.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Where Not to be in a Thunderstorm. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Where Not to be in a Thunderstorm.     During a thunderstorm, it is pointed   out, the inhabitants of houses should not   remain in the kitchen or other room where a fire is burning in the grate, as the heated, gases from the chimney-top pro-   vide a line of least resistance, and this   is so, whether the house be provided with lightning conductors or not.  

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Lamp Chimneys. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Lamp Chimneys   Lamp chimneys may be made more durable and less liable to crack by boil- ing- them before using them. The chim- neys are placed in a large saucepan or fish kettle, packed with straw, and the kettle is then filled with water and placed on the fire. As soon as the water boils take the kettle off the fire, but let the chimneys remain in it until the water is cold. Lamps should not be allowed to burn in a draught, nor should they be moved immediately after' they are put out, in either case the chimneys are liable to crack.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How to Renovate Brown Boots. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

How to Renovate Brown Boots.     First give the boots a tight treeing up either with trees or soft paper (the former method is the best), then give them a good wash with soap and luke- warm water, but do not sodden them. This can be done with a sponge or very soft brush. Do not brush too much in one place, but only till the dirt is all off. When this is done, put them under a tap, or give them another wash with warm, clean water without soap. It would be best now to give them a wash with some scouring fluid, but in either case, when quite dry, give them a good creaming. It is always wise to treat brown leather as above before it gets too dirty, as continual creaming with the dust on helps to impoverish and wear away the grain and beauty of such leather, and so causes them to crack and show dirty lines when creamed. From "Work"for. September.    

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Things to Remember. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Things to Remember.   Steel knives and forks not in dally use may be preserved from rust by keeping them in a bag of flannel or flannelette made like a glove, with a separate com partment for each knife, says " Myra's Journal." The disagreeable smell of cooking that is so often emitted by the kitchen range, and that pervades the whole house, may be entirely prevented by sprinkling a little cedar dust over the stove. The odour from this ls very pleasant, and ls quite as far-reaching as the smell of cooking. The flues of the kitchen grate should be cleaned out once a week, or they will become so clogged as to prevent the oven and boiler from heat- ing. To prevent the Incrustation in kettles caused by hard water put a flat oyster shell in the kettle. This will attract the particles of chalk that are in the water, and prevent the kettle becoming incrusted.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
I Haye Learned [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

I Have Learned   That a wadded basket to set the tea- pot in on the table ls a very good way of keeping the tea warm, almost preferable to a cosy. That the best way to clean mica is to wash it with diluted vinegar. That mats made of strips of cloth braided and sewn together make excel lent cloths to clean smoothing-irons on in the laundry. That old stocking legs make very con- venient sleeve-protectors. That a good way to hang up the kit- chen broom is to have two wooden pins put into the wall just far enough apart to admit the handle between_the_broom.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Black Stockings. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Black Stockings. Thé colour of black stockings may be restored by bolling them in an infusion of logwood. To make this buy two pennyworth of logwood shavings at the chemist's, san mix them with a pint of water. Boil the stockings in this, add- ing a little more' water if necessary. Stockings are now, however, so well dyed as a rule that an expedient of this kind is not often necessary.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Surgeon on Bicycles and Tricycles. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

A Surgeon on Bicycles and Tricycles. The number of middle-aged and el- derly people who want to know all about cycling in these cycle-fever days is enormous. Nobody can tell them all they want to know better than a sur- geon. Mr. Noble Smith, senior surgeon to the City Orthopaedic Hospital, is him- self a cyclist He has been in the habit of recommending cycling for patients suffering from various weaknesses, whenever it has been desirable to take off the weight of the body from the legs ; and he has been " well satisfied with the results." Concerning cycling generally, Mr. Noble Smith has the most decided opinions. For ail whom it is suitable it is capital exercise. "Am I to ride a bicycle or a tricycle ?" the middle-aged man wants to know. A bicycle, by all means, says Mr. Noble Smith, other things being equaL "A bicycle can be very quickly mastered without much risk of falls, even by a man past middle age." Concerning the labour expended on the three-wheeled machine as com- pared ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cycling as an Exercise. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Cycling as an Exercise. In Melbourne a few days ago, at the annual meeting of the Australian Health Society, Dr. J. W. Springthorne ? ? i i ? ? - ..¿j -crxj-xjj v,iuig cus "ttu ? Exercise." Of all the modern means of taking exercise cycling already ranked as one of the most important The safety, with its ball bearings, pneumatic tires, and its thousand improvements in gearing, &c., had already revolutionised the face of the civilised world, and made the cycle the greatest invention of modern times. What was almost uni- versally approved by the medical pro- fession, santioned by the elite of Paris, and patronised by the British royalty, needed no apology. Cycling was no mere leg exercise. It affected the arms and the body, and made the respiratory muscles more efficient for It expanded   the chest There was less fatigue in cycling six miles than In walking one mile, and one of the great advantages of the exercise was that it was per- formed in the fresh open air ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Comic Cuttings. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Comic Cuttings Turn your back on borrowed trouble and you will be better prepared to face the road. Mrs. De Goode : "What did the minister preach against to-day ?" Mr. De Goode, wearily : " He preached against time." " This servant you have now seems very nice and quiet." " Oh yes ; she doesn't even disturb the dust when clean- ing up a room." Bilkins : " I am advised to take a vacation and go abroad at once." Smithers : " Who advised you so-your doctor or your lawyer ?" Mr. Oldboy : " Say that you will be mine." She : " I cannot marry you ; but I tell you what I will do-I'll let you be a father to me." " My dear sir, don't you see I''ve been preaching to a congregation of jack- asses ?" " Oh, I see ! I wondered why you kept on calling 'em "'beloved brethren." "   " Waiter," said the guest, " I wish   you'd ask the proprietors to turn on a little more light. It's so dark ih here   that I can't tell whether I'm eating filleted sole or a paper of...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
[ALL BIGHTS RESERVED.] BROUGHT BACK TO LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

[ALL BIGHTS RESERVED.] BROUGHT BACK TO LIFE.   About the middle of the last century there   lived, in a quiet back street off Soho, a cer-     tain Doctor Norman, a surgeon of high   repute, attached to St. Bartholomew's Hos- pitaL His lectures there were well attended.       and from his pupils he received large fees. Concerning his private practice he did not   much trouble himself, and with the general . public he was not much in favour. Few   patients knocked at his door, and when they did there was a chance-unless their malady   happened to have attached to it a certain surgical interest-that their coming would be resented as almost an intrusion. He followed his profession, indeed, fax more for its own sake than for its emoluments.   Doctor Erasmus Norman enjoyed his existence amongst dust and cobwebs and begrimed ceilings a...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STREET ARAB A COVERNOR. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

STREET ARAB A COVERNOR. | !John Green Brady, of Indiana, who has     been appointed Governor of Alaska, never   knew his parente, says the "Savannah   News." He grew up a veritable street Arab   in his utmost poverty. In I860 he was sent   to Indiana with a cartload of waifs. The   car reached Tipton, a county seat thirty   miles north of Indianapolis, and a number of   the youngsters were committed to the care of   residents. Judge John Green, a prominent     citizen of the place, called for the ugliest,     raggedest, and most friendless " in the lot.   " Jack," as he was afterwards known, was promptly presented, and the Judge took the   lad home. He appreciated his home and the kindness of his benefactors, and diligently   applied himself to study. A course at th...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WEATHERCOCKS AND VANES [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

WEATHERCOCKS AND VANES   Weathercocks are to be divided into two   classes, the weathercock proper, which is the   gilded figure of chanticleer; and the vane, which, turning with every wind equally with the other variety, does not show the rooster as an emblem. The cock, it should be said, is both the badge of St. Peter and the emblem of vigilance; and, as such, is chosen to denote the Christian Church. There are, however, many churches which have vanes instead of weathercocks. Chief among them may be noted the church of Great Gomersby, Lincolnshire, whose squat" steeple is sur-   mounted by a fiddle, with its bow. Another   remarkable vane is that to be seen over the market-house of Camelford, in Cornwall. The local authorities have placed the figure, of a camel over their principal building, in allusion to the name of the town, and a caricature of a camel it is, with a terrific hump, and a weird, unholy smile. Perhap...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FLIRTING WITH THE FAN. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

FLIRTING WITH THE FAN It is really amusing m this matter-of-fact     day and generation, to see a Spanish woman   flirt with her fan. Spanish women are not . ?very brilliant as far as wit or conversation     goes, but, give senorita a fan and the use of   her eyes« and she can capture and hold a   lover over whom the most brilliant repartee   and the most charming chatter could have no   influence at alL The young Spanish girls of good society are of course rigorously guarded, but balconies and opera boxes are where their flirtations are carried on. At the theatre a   young Spanish, beauty, seated between two duennas, will openly coquet with her fan in   response to the languishing glances of a lover in some other part of the house. For     example, when the lady draws it through     her han...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FLOWERS THAT ARE EATEN. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

FLOWERS THAT ARE EATEN. The use of flowers, such as rose leaves and   violets.for making confections is well-known.   Now the nasturtium is treated in alike manner, and the products are received with much liking. The flower and its pungent leaves are said to possess valuable dietetic properties, and are classed among the most approved additions for salads and sandwiches to vary the menu. The latest accession to the dietary list is that favourite autumn flower, the chrysan themum. Those who have tried this flower food proclaim it to be as pleasant to taste as it is to look apon. Chrysanthemums are served as a salad with a French dressing, or chopped fine with a nicely seasoned cream sauce poured over them. The flowers have a flavour somewhat similar to the cauliflower but more delicate. A flower salad that the French consider a great delicacy is madë from the young pink and white clover blossoms.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HER PROUDEST MOMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

HER PROUDEST MOMENT. One of the proudest moments of a girl's   life is when she receives her first engagement ring. She is so pleased with the jewelled circle   that one cannot but participate in her plea- sure. Sven the most stately maid melts into a state of undisguised simplicity while the thing is a novelty. How often does she take occasion to pull off her glove to reveal its daintiness ? And   the action is so suggestive that the most un-   suspecting person is made aware of her in-   tentions. Then what a patting of back hair is neces- sary at this period. Never was coiffure so constantly needing a soothing hand to coax it into shape.   And nobody knows better than she how   well the pretty jewelled band looks on the slender white finger, its beauty enhanced by contrast with the soft, brown hair.   Never does she feel more pride in the big fellow than when he places the bind...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"I THOWT I FELT A HOP!" [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

"I THOWT I FELT A HOP!"   An Irishman went into a public-house one   day, and asked for a mug of beer in a great   hurry, stating that he was so dry he thought     he could drink a gallon. The publican told   him that if he would drink it at one draught,     without taking the measure away from his lips he should hare it for nothing " Agraid," said Pat, " and, be the howly Saint Pathrick, I'll do that same." The   landlord then drew a big measure of ale, and slily slipping a red herring into the measure, handed it to Pat, who eagerly raised it to his mouth, and drank away until the measure   had been elevated almost perpendicularly. , The publican's eyes followed its motion in   astonishment, and, looking in it, he ex- claimed, shaking the froth out, " Pat, didn't you feel anything going down with the beer, when you drank it?" "Be the powers,...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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