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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ROYALTY'S SHOES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

ROYALTY'S SHOES. For the bride at our Royal weddings, it was at one time customary to order very large quan- tities of boots and shoes, twelve dozen pairs being a not uncommon number. The Duchess of Fife, however, had three dozen pairs, and this is nowadays somewhere about the average.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE "WHEN" POEMS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE "WHEN" POEMS. When searching press or magazine To catch a moment's bliss, You're sure to find some poem there Which reads about like this: "When Mabel Trips Across the Street," "When Mollie Mounts Her Wheel," "When Susie Seats Herself to Play," "When Stella Starts to Squeal." "When Rachel Rakes the Meadow Hay," "When Betsey Bumps Her Crown," "When Willie Wears His Trousers First," "When Reuben Comes to Town." And so it goes from day to day, No matter what you read, The daily press or magazine, "When" poems take the lead. —"Life," N.Y.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HER FIRST VOYAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

HER FIRST VOYAGE, Steward (knocking): "Miss Jenkins, don't you feel like a little cold chicken?" Miss Jenkins (from within): "I don't know how a little cold chicken feels, but I'm feeling pretty —ugh!—queer."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTABLE PLACES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

NOTABLE PLACES. Brief descriptions, properly authenti- cated, of notable places throughout Aus- tralasia, with accompanying rough sketches or photographs, similar to that appearing on our front page, will be ac- cepted by the Editor of "The World's News," and paid for at current rates.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The World's News. A RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

The World's News. A RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS, Issued from the office of ''The Daily Tele- graph," Sydney, every Saturday morning, and sold by all newsagents throughout the Commonwealth at One Penny per copy. Communications intended for publica- tion should be addressed to the Editor. Business communications should be ad-   dressed to the Manager of "The World's News," 147 King-street, Sydney.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WEEK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE WEEK. The annual report of the Victoria Coun- cil of Supreme Court Judges may not be regarded in the light of soul-intoxicating literature, yet Young Australia has at va- rious times been moved to throw up his cap and shout "Hooray" over much less than the contents of this prosaic document. For it adds another chapter to the continuous record of moral improvement, of which dur- ing recent years the whole of these States have been able to boast. Beginning with criminal jurisdiction, the cases dealt with in Melbourne numbered but 202, as against 230 for the previous year. In the country there was not such a drop, but nevertheless, in spite of the increased population, the number fell from 212 to 209. In the civil jurisdiction the work of the Court was rendered still lighter, for while the writs issued during 1900 amounted to 895, this year they only total 770. And of these not more than 161 were set down for trial. There was likewise a slight falling off in divorce, thus showing a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A STAGE SNEEZE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A STAGE SNEEZE.   Ernest Blum, in his "Journal d'un Vaudevill- iste," tells the following story of the French   actor, Bressant, whose beautiful voice and im-   passioned love-making made him a great favor-   ite, especially with women. One evening, as the   crisis of his love scene approached, he felt an   irresistible impulse to sneeze. He tried to control   it, but every word he uttered made matters   worse. He had a sudden inspiration. His part   did not require him to throw himself at the   lady's feet, but he did so, buried his face in the folds of her dress, and sneezed comfortably be-   tween two loud sobs of emotion. The actress   was overcome by laughter that she was com-   pelled to leave the stage, whereupon Bressant   improvised thus: "She is heartless. I can never   win her lov...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FAR NORTH. A CARPENTARIA CITY. BORROLOOLA DESCRIBED. WHAT PROFESSOR SPENCER SAYS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

FAR NORTH. A CARPENTARIA CITY. BORROLOOLA DESCRIBED. WHAT PROFESSOR. SPENCER SAYS. Writing to a friend from Borroloola, a forlorn Northern Territory "town" on the Gulf of Car- pentaria, on 12th November, Professor Balwin Spencer (of the Spencer-Gillen. expedition) says: —"After a month's travel we are at length at Borroloola. All our visions of tropical luxu- riance and beauty have vanished like a dream. There is nothing here save an open plain, with dry, cracked ground, and yellow, withered stalks of grass and scattered gum trees. "Not a palm or fern or orchid, nor a damp spot, save in the water itself, which is brackish and affected by the tide. The only animals are a few birds, and ants galore. Never a beetle, and scarcely a butterfly. "It is awfully disappointing, as the 'Gulf Coun- try' has a kind of tropical sound, but save for the heat there is nought else tropical. "This great city consists of—(1) a publichouse, (2) a store, (3) a policeman's home, and (4) a Chinese tailor's...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHAMPAGNE AND CANCER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

CHAMPAGNE AND CANCER. There is a remarkable coincidence between the spread of cancer and the largely increased daily consumption of effervescent wines and waters among the wealthy classes. Prior to the   sixties champagne as a drink was, even in higher circles, partaken of but occasionally, nor were aerated waters consumed in anything like the quantity nor with the frequency that they now are. These beverages, and indeed, all effer- vescing drinks, owe their sparkle to the car- bonic acid gas which they contain. My con- tention is that the upper classes, by their habit of constantly imbibing effervescent beverages, which are solutions of carbonic acid of greater or less strength, so prepare their mucous tissues as to make them a favoring host to the can- cerous fungus, if fungus it be. —J. Irwin Palmer, M.R.C.S., In "Medical Times."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HORSE V. MOTOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

HORSE V. MOTOR.   Before the horse hides his diminished head before the motor, the horse is to make one more struggle, it not for victory then to fall with honor. A match between a motor car and a horse has been arranged between two well-known French sportsmen, M. Tranchaint, one of the automobilists of the Paris-Berlin race, and Lieutenant Caplain, of the Dragoons. The match is from Paris to St. Petersburg, and is for £400. The machinist rides a twenty horse-power motor car, and the officer his own specially-trained horse. The start is to be simultaneous, but each may select his own itinerary.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
What to Eat. AND WHAT NOT TO EAT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

What to Eat. AND WHAT NOT TO EAT.   Sir Henry Thompson. Bart., F.R.C.S., M.D.,   London, Surgeon-Extraordinary to the King of   the Belgians, and Consulting Surgeon to Uni-   versity College Hospital. London, etc., etc., was   born in 1820. He is now, therefore, in his 82nd year, and is still strong and healthy. It is this, coupled with the fact that Sir Henry's whole life has been devoted to discovering the whys and the wherefores of health, that make the following notes extracted from his two books, "Food and Feeding," and "Diet in Relation to Age and Activity," of real interest to every man and woman. TALKING OF STOUTNESS. Any tendency to corpulency may be fought by largely reducing the use of fatty foods; by re- nouncing all pastry, which contains that element largely; also, cream and milk, as well as all starchy matter, which abounds in the potato and other mealy products of the vegetable king- dom; and especially...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO LAST PLACE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

NO LAST PLACE.   "Why did you leave your last place?" asked   Mrs. Willoughby of the would-be cook.   "I hoven't left my lasht place," replied the   applicant. "I hoven't had any lasht place to   leave. I've been worrkin' for meeelf for six months, an' I can recommind meself to yez very hoighly!"  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RARE AND EXPENSIVE COINS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

RARE AND EXPENSIVE COINS.   At Sotheby's, during November, many in- teresting coins and medals have been sold. A Mary I. sovereign, 1554, one of three recorded specimens, brought £30; a Commonwealth six- pence, 1659, fine and extremely rare, also one of three examples recorded, £7; Charles I. Bris- tol twopence, £8 15s; James I. crown of first coin- age, £10; Charles I. Oxford pound piece, 1642, £10 15s; Charles I. Shrewsbury half-crown, 1642, £17 5s; William IV. pattern penny, 1830, struck at the Soho Mint in proclamation of Princess Vic- toria as Heir Presumptive to the British Throne on the accession of her uncle, King William IV., £4 4s; another of the same, but with different reading, £6 10s; an official medal by T. Brock, R.A., commemorating the Diamond Jubilee of the reign of her late Majesty, 1837-1897, £11 12s 6d.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FASHIONABLE SCAVENGERS. LONG DRESSES DOOMED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

FASHIONABLE SCAVENGERS.     LONG DRESSES DOOMED. The Melbourne Board of Health has entered on the dangerous experiment of telling a woman what not to wear. Recently Lord Hopetoun took upon himself to denounce long dresses. He is a privileged person, and whilst a lady might not take him seriously as a guide to complete fashion, she at least tolerates his opinions. At last week's meeting of the Board of Health Mr. Wood, who may or may not be a married man, drew attention to street expectoration and long dresses. The two, he said, were closely allied. The board, he felt, ought to express an opinion as to the length ladies should wear their dresses. He had been assured, he said, by many ladies that if a general movement were made to shorten skirts, they would be only too pleased to adopt it. Mr. Wood had walked down Collins-street on a wet day—most sensible people would have gone down on the tram—and had been simply appalled at the glaring iniquity of lovely dr...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Beauty Bought. AT HIGH PRICES. WHAT SOME LADIES SPEND ON COMPLEXIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Beauty Bought. AT HIGH PRICES. WHAT SOME LADIES SPEND ON COMPLEXIONS. Two hundred pounds a year seems a large   sum to pay annually for the up-keep of a good   complexion. It is, but there are many ladies   whom it costs even more than that to maintain   their faces in first-class order, for there are a   hundred such trifles as complexion soaps at   seven and sixpence a two-ounce tablet, and lo-   tions at thirty-five shillings an ounce bottle,   of which the average man dreams not, but which   help to add to "my lady's" expensive beauty.   The fact of the matter is that a beautiful face   is the most priceless gift with which a wealthy   woman can be endowed, and knowing it is beau- tiful, perhaps it is not surprising that she should resort to all sorts of arts and devices to keep   it in as perfect a condition as ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HE QUOTED THE OLD CHESTNUT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

HE QUOTED THE OLD CHESTNUT. "In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love." She deeply sighed, and shook her head. "That's the trouble," she replied. "They turn lightly instead of seriously." For she was a girl who had been through sev- eral engagements.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Musicians' Marvellous Memories. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Musicians' Marvellous Memories. The late Sir Charles Halle had a phenomenal memory. Wilhelm Kuhe, in his "Musical Recol- lections," relates that he was able to sit down and, at a moment's notice, play any composition of Bach, Beethoven, or Chopin. On more than one occasion, also, he played from memory during a cycle of performances the whole of Beethoven's 82 sonatas alternately with the 48 preludes and figures of Bach's "Wohltemperirte Klavier." HANS RICHTER. Dr. Hans Richter, whose world-wide fame as a conductor is alone able to fill the largest concert hall, affords another example of wonderful mne- monic power. Not only is he thoroughly pro- ficient on almost any instrument, but his ac- quaintance with the masters whose works he conducts is so complete and exhaustive that, were their entire scores lost, he would be able to re- cover them whole from the depths of his mar- vellous memory. REMARKABLE RUBENSTEIN. Equally remarkable are the performances re- corded of Rubinstein, the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BURNING A BOER WAGGON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

BURNING A BOER WAGGON. This illustration shows how when a Boer commando is captured in South Africa the waggons are disposed. Some, of course, are utilised by the British. But, as in the ma- jority of cases they would   only impede the British, they   are set on fire, care being   taken to see that they burn   right out before the column   moves on.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SURGICAL CURIOSITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A SURGICAL CURIOSITY. Peter Keenan is just now interesting New   York doctors. He neither eats nor drinks in the   usual manner, but feeds himself through a tube   inserted in his stomach. The tube diet agrees   with Keenan, and from a living skeleton he has   become a robust, powerful man, weighing 204lb.   It is said that his equal in physique has never   existed among the few men who have lived,   as he does, through the grace of modern stom-   achic surgery. Keenan has demonstrated that   the origin of thirst is not in the throat, and that   men do not smoke because they like the feeling   or taste of the smoke in the mouth or throat,   and the odor. Keenan's craving for liquids is   purely a matter of the stomach. He feels the   need of water or beer or milk or coffee at inter- &amp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DESTROYING A BOER BARN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

DESTROYING A BOER BARN.   Another method employed of bringing the Boers to reason is that of burning their barns, which the sketch illustrates. If this were not done, the barns would only be a harbor for re- negades and traitors.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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