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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,057 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. MICHIGAN University has made a number ot changes in its elective system lately. This, no doubt, impels the Chronicle to give the following article on the " Choice of Electives " As personal liberty and responsibility are inseparably united, the University student of the future, who is to enjoy the privilege of using his own judgment in choosing his work, has an important and serious task before him. Heretofore the student has, for the most part, been able to tell just what work he would be pursuing at any part of his course, and if he learned well the three lessons which antiquity had destined for him, his duty was fulfilled. But the inevitable element having been superseded by the rational, every student must weigh carefully his own intellectual needs and powers before he shall decide what studies it will be best for him to elect. " We do not arrogate to ourselves the task of marking out any course of study for our readers who are to have the benefit of electing thei...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Cornell:— A Freshman the other day confifidently referred to the chief inhabitant of Dr. Wilder's aquarium as "mock turtle." A Senior disposing of his miscellaneous effects the other day sold a wall text, " In God we Trust " to a Sophomore for fifty cents, saying that he had no further need of it. A sketch from life : First student, (slowly ascending the hill, intently engaged in reading a paper.) Second student: " What are you reading ?" "An examination paper." "When did you have it?" "O ! it comes off this afternoon !" Manager Bradley submits a report of the finances of the Base Ball Association, by which it appears that there has been received from various sources $298.10. The total expenditures have amounted to $291.98, leaving a balance of $6.12. The members of the nine are requested to leave their uniforms with Bailey before leaving town. The result of this year's management is highly creditable to Mr. Bradley, and it is safe to say that the affairs of the B...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
PROSPECTUS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

PROSPECTUS. VOL. III. 1878—'79. The Columbia Spectator. The Official Students' Paper of Columbia College, New York. IN the new year, as in the old, THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR will be devoted exclusively to the best interests of the students and graduates of Columbia College. It will-con-tinue to be, in a more perfect form, what it now is, strictly a College paper, —not a receptacle for the manuscripts of ambitious composition-writers, nor a dry chronicle of facts, but a live, vigorous and aggressive journal, edited by the students and for the students. Its editorial departments will be conducted as heretofore, on the maxim "Independent in everything, neutral in nothing." Its literary department will contain light and entertaining sketches apropos of college-subjects, incidents and notes of travel and adventure, arcicles on subjects directly connected with College education, and poems of a promising character. The news department of THE SPECTATOR, both domestic and inter-collegiate, was ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 111. —1878-1879. BOARD OF EDITORS : HENRY G. PAINE, '79, Managing Editor. W. BARCLAY PARSONS, JR., 'yg. * SYLVANUS B. POND, '79. THOS. J. BRERETON, JR., '79- WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. F. W. HOLLS, B. A., 'BO. S. of L. C. D. STARR, 'Bl, S. of M. WILLIAM S. SLOAN, 'Bl, Treasurer. F. E. WARD, 'Bl, S. of M. * Resigned. ► NEW YORK : PRESS OF GILLISS BROTHERS. 1879. The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 111. No. i. NEW YORK, OCTOBER ist, 1878. WHOLE NO. 21. Board of Editors, 1878-1879. HENRY G. PAINE, '79, Managing Editor. W. BARCLAY PARSONS, JR. '79- SYLVANUS B. POND. '79. THOMAS J. BRERETON, JR. '79. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. F. W. PIOLLS, B. A. 'BO. S. of L. C. D. STARR, 'BO. S. of M. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - 15 cts. Re...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CONTENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

CONTENTS. PAGE. ABOUT COLLEGE. .. .5, 17, 29, 40, 52, 67, 79, 90, 103 Athletics 41, 68 Boat Club 40 Foot-Ball 41 Glee Club Notes » 53 Semi-Annual 68, 90 ALUMNI NOTES 19 AMERICAN COLLEGES 74 ANNUAL MEETING OF THE YALE COLLEGE BOAT CLUB 78 A SKETCH OF THE FUTURE 100 A TALK WITH MR. GOODWIN 78 A VISIT FROM THE TRUSTEES. 77 A VISIT TO MENLO PARK 15 BREAKING-UP SONG 81 COAL MINES OF ANTRIM, PA 32 COLLEGE WORLD 8, 22, 33, 44, 56, 70, 83, 94, 106 CORRESPONDENCE : Burial 79 Class of 'Bl 103 FLarvard's Answer to Freshmen Challenge. 69 Rational Plan for Semi-Annual 39 Semi-Annual 89, 103 CURRENT TOPICS: — A Few Words on the Curriculum 13 | A New Campus 2 An Ancient Landmark Removed 50 Change in THE SPECTATOR 97 Changes 1 Columbia's Victory 3 Concerning Semi-Annual 5° Examination Season 97 Foot-Ball 1 Freshman Foot-Ball Match 61 Happy New Year 73 PAGE. CURRENT TOPICS: — Hare and Hounds 37, 74 Harvard Theatricals 73 Improvements 1 Intercollegiate Rowing 38 Lack of Interest in Foot-Ball 14 New B...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. ONCE more the curtain lifts upon another act in the drama of college life ; and once more THE SPECTATOR, lorgnette in hand, takes his seat in the proscenium, ready to observe, record, approve, and suggest, in his usual impartial manner. As heretofore, THE SPECTATOR, being a "spectator," and not a mere critic, will strive to represent the general feeling of the College on all topics of interest. Encouraging by generous applause everything which seems likely to elevate the students and unite them more closely; discouraging, by timely warning and censure, whatever tends to puerility and selfishness. Thus, THE SPECTATOR, while not remaining neutral in respect to any question, will never descend to partisanship. With this simple reiteration of his principles, he begins the business of the year. THE first thing which will strike the student returning to his Alma Mater will be its generally demoralized appearance. The unsightly fence running across the campus, along the wes...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Columbia's Victory. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

Columbia's Victory. THE glorious victory achieved by our crew at Henley fills each one of us with pride when we think of the new honors that have thus been heaped upon the name of our dear old Alma Mater. To those four men who fought the fight, too much praise can not be given. Never can we forget the admirable steering of Sage; the cool judgment of Captain Goodwin ; the hard, honest work of Edson and Ridabock ; combined with one common quality in all, indomitable pluck. The victory is perhaps enhanced by the fact that few really believed, when the crew sailed last May, that they would return victors. What a sigh of relief must have been drawn by those of our sister colleges who last spring were so fearful lest we should claim the right to represent them, and thus bring down their fair names by our defeat. But that is past. The crew has gone and has returned bringing back with them the first trophy that has ever been won from Englishmen on their own waters. To those who are acquaint...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
"MOUNT COLUMBIA." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

"MOUNT COLUMBIA." MOST of our readers are probably not aware of the fact that a large mountain in Colorado has been named " Mt. Columbia" in honor of our College, and in commemoration of the victory at Henley. Yet such is the fact, as will be seen from the letter which we append. Georgetown, Colo., July tyh, 1878. MR. SPECTATOR : An episode which occurred yesterday near this beautiful town may not be without interest to your readers: namely the christening of a mountain in honor of Columbia College and her victory in England. Early in the morning Mr. St. George Stanley of this place, Mr. James T. Ringgold, editor of the Baltimore Telegram, and your correspondent started out for the finest point of view on the globe, Argentine Passnine miles from here. After a horseback ride of about three and a half hours, enlivened by a snow-balling, (on July Bth,) we arrived at the Pass —the beauty of which defies human descriptive powers. Standing here with one foot on the Atlantic, the othei on ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SECOND ANNUAL REGATTA OF THE M. A. A. O. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

SECOND ANNUAL REGATTA OF THE M. A. A. O. THE Second Annual Regatta of the Metropolitan Association was rowed on the 28th of August on the Hudson River, opposite Carmansville. The course lay under the Palisades, beginning at the powder house on the bank and terminating at the Pleasant Valley dock. It had been intended to have the course a mile and a half in length, but owing to some kind misunderstanding, it was over two miles. The first race for single sculls brought out E. L. Phillips, of the Triton Club, of Newark, and J. Maginn, of the Waverly. It was an even thing for half the distance, when Maginn was washed by a steamer, thus allowing Phillips to win by six lengths. Time, 11 min. i8j£sec. The next race was for four-oared gigs, with the following clubs represented : Nereid, Carman, Argonauta, Bayonne and Nonpareil. This was very close, until the Nereids, Bayonnes and Nonpareils were completely thrown out by the waves of some tugs which clustered around the race boats. This cont...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
HENLEY ROYAL REGATTA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

HENLEY ROYAL REGATTA. TO those of our students who have not had the good fortune to visit Henley, a few words of description will not, perhaps, be amiss. The course, which is i mile, 2 furlongs and 20 perches in length, is about 60 miles from London, and is at its broadest point about 400 feet wide. As the river is locked about every three miles, the current is almost imperceptible, but what little there is, runs in an opposite direction to the races. Along the right hand bank is a towing path, which during a race is thronged with men on foot running alongside of their favorite boat. The start is effected from a pretty little island in the middle of the stream. The course runs perfectly straight for about a mile, when the only bend occurs. This bend is caused by Poplar Point. Three boats are started in a heat, and the positions are called Berks, Center, and Bucks, after the two counties of Berkshire and Buckinghamshire, which the river here divides. The Berkshire is the best, on acc...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. VACATION is almost over. BRACE-UP, and pass all >our conditions. THE first duty of every Freshman is to subscribe for THE SPECTATOR. MR. SMITH returns an Adjunct Professor from a two and a half month's stay in Heidelberg. MORE new benches have been placed in the Chapel although some of the old ones still disgrace it. THE basement has been entirely refloored in a handsome manner with Georgia pine. MR. ASHMORE'S room has been reduced to a level and new chairs to the number of 81 placed in it. THE new benches in Chapel will barely leave room between them for the students to pass in and out. NEW CHAIRS have also been substituted for the benches and desks in Prof. Drisler's and Mr. Merriam's rooms. PROF. VAN AMRINGE has been spending the Summer at Washingtonville, back of Cornwall-on-the-Hudson. MR. INGERSOLL has become a married man during the vacation. He will still, however, continue to assist Prof. Peck. THE only perceptible damage done to the College by the...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

School of Mines. THERE have been but few alterations made within the building during our absence. The most prominent of these are the closets built at the east ■ends of the quantitative laboratory and the drawing room. The glass traps to the sinks in the laboratories are an innovation that will save considerable expense and trouble to the school, unless, indeed, they become targets for those who may be destructively inclined. It was found necessary to renew the leaden traps at least once a year, owing to corrosion, and in the third year laboratory, where mercury is used, they were frequently destroyed in half that time. Perhaps no part of the institution has undergone such change during the past year as has the engine room. Under the supervision of the able engineer now in charge, Mr. Jehn, the room presents a marked contrast to Ivunke's disorderly sanctum. The arrangements throughout are as neat as possible, and show their master to be a man of brains as well as fingers. Still grea...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Colby : Every one is complaining of the water at the Colleges. The Faculty and students are to send Seventy-five dollars to the sufferers of the South. The following Class Presidents have been elected : '79, Murray; 'BO, C. C. King; 'Bi, Preble; 'B2, Elliot. Thirty-two out of the present Freshman Class have joined the Young Men's Christian Association of the College. The Ivy Day of '79 passed very pleasantly ; even the shower which drove them into the Chapel near the close of the exercises did not spoil the enjoyment of it. Tne second annual Rope-Pull between the Sophomores and Freshmen occurred 011 Wednesday, the nth. Both the first and the second trials resulted in favor of 'B2. Dartmouth:— Pres. Bartlett has inaugurated a series of regular Monday morning talks. Harry G. Mclntire of Littleton, N. H. has been elected Senior Historian. The contributions to the Yellow Fever Fund will amount to about two hundred dollars. Dunning, formerly of 'Bl, is soon to enter Co...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. THE Albany Law Journal, under the able management of Mr. Isaac Grant Thompson, is now undoubtedly the best practical legal periodical in the country. It does not contain long theoretical articles on cases arising perhaps once in a century, but on the contrary, brings nothing which is not of direct practical value to the working lawyer or the student. No new case of any value is omitted, and the editorials and reviews are very excellent contributions to contemporary legal and critical thought. It gives us pleasure to call our readers attention to so worthy an object. THE college student has received considerable attention in the magazine world during the summer. The New Englander of September contains an admirable article on the " Student in American Colleges," by Prof. Jacob Cooper, of Rutgers College. We would especially commend his defense of Secret Fraternities, which, coming from so high an authority, will do much towards disabusing the public mind ot popular prej...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. THE most notable event of the new season in music will certainly be the series of Roze-Mapleson concerts in Steinway Hall. Marie Roze, after having won the greatest laurels on the stage in Europe and here, now intends to delight American audiences with songs in the concert-room. We understand that Signor Brigmoli, W. T. Carlton and Mr. Ferdinand O 1 Dulcken will appear simultaneously in these entertainments, the whole forming a combination such as has rarely been equalled in this city. We have no doubt our music-loving readers and students will take the hint conveyed in this note, and help by their presence to encourage Mr. Mapleson's praiseworthy efforts in the cause of the highest kind of musical art. THE Dramatic Season augurs well. Two classical pieces "The School for Scandal" at Wallacks, and "Henry VIII." at Booth's being now on the boards. We hope to refer to these as well as other dramatic events of importance regularly hereafter. " Mother and Son " is i...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

THE LIBRARY. ENGLISH MEN OF LETTERS. Edited BY JOHN MORLEY. I. Samuel Johnson , by Leslie Stephen; 2. Edward Gibbon , by James Cotter Morison ; 3. Sir Walter Scott, By Richard H. Hutton. New York: Harpers. i2mo. Cloth. 75 cts. per vol. In 1868 Mr. Gladstone, in expressing- to the late Mr. Hope Scott the great delight which the perusal of Lockhart's Life of Sir Walter had given him, wrote : " I may be wrong, but I am vaguely under the impression that it has never had a really wide circulation. If so, it is the saddest pity, and I should greatly like (without any censure on its present length) to see published an abbreviation of it." The ex-Premier was not aware that Lockhart himself had twenty years before published an abbreviation which, however, was in itself very bulky, and so fell into the neglect which is the merited lot of all " condensations." Yet, undoubtedly, the great length of the most delightful biographies in the language, such as the one mentioned, Bos well's Johnson , ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1878

SHAVINGS. PROF. : " There is one error in the working of the Atwood Machine—how can it be corrected ? " Student: "By greasing the machine, I suppose." AN intoxicated man passing a door over which was the sign, "Cast Iron Sinks," looked up, and after reading the sign several times chuckled and said, "Well, who the (hie) said it didn't?" OH, mule ! What strong and complicate machinery ! What sudden and precipitate extremes ; Man's judgment and his vision must be keen, or he Will hesitate to rouse thee from thy dreams. A rugged school Trained thy great quadriceps extensor To bust a keg of nails, kick down a fence, or Lift a man, oh mule ! Say, mule, Thou was't not always thus insoluble, Insensate to a kindly touch or word ? Not always have thy accents, loud and voluble, Man's fearful heart with dreadful terror stirred. Has your harsh rule Always impelled him, with emotions fleet To fly the fondling of thy later feet ? Say, gentle mule ? Speak, mule; Why didst thou, with intense vitalit...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 111. No. 2. NEW YORK, OCTOBER 15th, 1878. WHOLE NO. 22. Board of Editors, 1878-1879. HENRY G. PAINE, '79, Managing Editor. W. BARCLAY PARSONS, JR. '79- SYLVANUS B. POND. '79. THOMAS J. BRERETON, JR. '79. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. F. W. HOLLS, B. A. 'BO. S. of L. C. D. STARR, 'BO. S. of M. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - 15 cts. Remittances by mail should be addressed to WILLIAMS. SLOAN, 'Bl, Treasurer. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. COLLEGE has now fairly begun. The confusion necessarily incidental to the first week of the term is over. Vacation is a thing of the past. Even for the Freshman, the novelty of his surroundings has worn off, and as he walks with jaunty step up Fifth Avenue, Harper's text in hand, he can hardly imagine that it was less than two weeks ago that he commenced these daily pilgrimages to the shrine of knowledge. The Sophomores early and easily grew accustomed to their more dignified position, although here and there, traces of freshmanity still stick out. For the Juniors and Seniors, however, little effort was required to realize their advancement towards the coveted sheepskin. So now that everything is moving along in its regular and accustomed channels, we can with calmness discuss the prospects for the year in both a literary and athletic point of view. WE regret that we will be unable to record any improvements in the course of instruction, which will remain identical w...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE CANE RUSH. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1878

THE CANE RUSH. ON leaving the class-rooms, on Friday last, shouts were heard of "81 " and "82. " Immediately the students hurried out of the cloak-room to see what was the excitement. They found a number of upper-class-men and miners standing on the terrace in front of the college trying to urge on the under-class-men to deeds of bravery. At first it seemed as if their shouts were in vain, but soon a number of Sophs appeared ready for the fray. A cane was produced and placed in tempting position, but still no Freshman. The cane was taken down on the campus and after a little delay some venturesome freshmen appeared, and the rush began. From the first the Sophomores outnumbered the freshmen, and although they dragged them round the campus, they could not get them to let go their hold upon the cane. Often there could be seen numbers of the Freshman class, emerging from the scuffle, gripping each other as if for dear life, until informed by some compassionate Senior that they belonged ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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