ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Indian Advocate, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
4,460 results
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

v3TOp$1! 1 ymf"- " TITE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 first beginning in England, and that these "verses of praise" which were intended to be sung, wore the founda tion upon which the later Bead-Psalter was formed. During the Pontificate of Alexander III., when the tramp of the armies of Barbarossa made the thrones of Europe tremble, as though an earthquake passed; in that age of chivalry and holy zeal for the Christian cause, when the cry of "The Cross" resounded through the hills and vales of Pales tine, and the noblest blood of the Crusaders was poured freely forth in the attempt to wrest the holy places from Saracenic hands, came the child into the world with whose name the thought of the devotion of the Rosary is inseparably entwined. Dominic de Guzman was born in Spain, 1170, and from his earliest years was distinguished for the holiness of his life and a marvelous, self-sacrificing spirit of charity. Tn 1216, Dominic the Spaniard and Fran cis of Assisi met in Rome. Each one recognized ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

,Tj-.v-rwy " FnJWfW"' " ? V"T3';TK",i,T TjBTJ? INDIAN ADVOCATE. Kf. 5.W The word Rosary was originally ap plied to the third part of the whole Bead-Psalter, but in this sense was not used in England until the close of the fifteenth century. It has now quite taken the place of the term "Psalter," which has become obsolete. The Anglo-Saxon beodan or biddan to pray was the word from which our bead is derived. Hence also bedesman one who prays. "To thee I bidde my bede." The costliest gems and most skillful workmanship united in giving value and Beauty to These Chaplets; and the artificers who worked at them were known bjr the title of "Pater nosters," and lived in Paternoster row. So this legacy of St. Dominic found its way into every Christian home, and, with the blessing of heaven upon it, continued to be a source of grace, and comfort, and sweet support "The ap peaser of the anger of God, the rainbow of peac5, uniting heaven irritated with the guilty earth.' ' In the time of Pius V....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

YIifPWWftW FWSWJSr7,JT"T" -" irwij'i"if ,rw" 2m? INDIAN ADVOCATE. 83 The Old Year's Blessing I am fading from you, But one drawoth near, Called the Angel-guardian Of the coming year. If my gifts and graces Coldly you forget, Let the Now Year's Angel Bless and crown them yet. For we work together; He and I are one: Let him end and perfect All I leave undone. I brought Good Desires Though as yet but seeds ; Let the New Year make them Blossom into Deeds. I brought Joy to brighten Many happy days; Let the New Year's Angel Turn it into praise. If I gave you Sickness, If I brought you Care, Let him make one Patience, And the other Prayer. Where I brought you Sorrow, Through his care, at length, It may rise triumphant Into future Strength. If I brought you Plenty, All wealth's bounteous charms, Shall not the New Angel Turn them into Alms? I gave Health and Leisure, Skill to dream and plan, Let him make them nobler Work for God and Man. If I broke your Idols, Showed you they were dust, Let ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

W7' ' t"7 SJf. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. on and eternity; you sacrifice God, your own salvation, your own soul, and your own happiness, even as you sacri fice your duty and your conscience to a miserable fear of man, which is a thousand times unworthy of a Christian, and is despicable in a man. "I should be ridiculed," you say! What a grievous ailliction! What effect would it have upon you? You can surely afford to despise what is so utterly beneath your notice. Suppos ing men laughed at you because you ate when you were hungry, and drank when you were thirsty, and warmed yourself when you were cold, because you loved your mother, because you were not a scoundrel. I am speaking seriously would you change, do you think, and try to act in some manner which would give greater satisfaction to those who thus criticized you? You will not trouble yourself to answer such a question? There is that which is more reasonable, more natural, more lawful, and more necessary still; obed ience to God, yo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

gETUMiffjW 'tfPl5,y,SWWM v -mgHrn THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 85 in Nevada, $718, and inWyoming, $768. In the States, where colored labor is abundant the total average earnings are much less. In Alabama the aver age is $376; in Mississippi, $310; in North Carolina, $216; in Georgia, $307; in South Carolina, $267; in New York t lie average is $550; in Pennsylvania, $492; in Ohio, $479; and in Massachu setts, $494. When it is considered to what extent the female and child labor enters into the factory operation s in New York, the figures are surprisingly high. The total wages paid in New York manufacturing enterprises amount in ordinary years to the enor mous sum of $500,000,000. England stands at the head in Eu rope as the best market for labor. Scotland and France are a little behind her. Then there is a heavy drop until Austria, the Netherlands and Belgium are reached; the scale goes still lower in Germany, where the rate is the same as in Ireland, Spain, Sweden, Russia, and Italy follow ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

mmmmmmmmmmmmamm "iywESffiiffyPS'iiF,.y i9 -n- k rr no5frTijpjp" ; 56 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. f had developed in the campaigns of the great commanders of the time. Mean while Catholics were swelling in the ranks, and, like Moylan, rising to fame and position. The American navy had her first commodore in the Catholic Barry, who had kept the (lag waving u n dim mod on the seas from 1770, and in 17S1 engaged and took the two En glish vessels Atlanta and Trepassay; and on other occasions handled his majesty's vessels so roughly that Gen eral Howe endeavored to win him hy offers of money and high naval rank to desert the cause. Besides Catholic born, who served in army and navy, the legislative or executive, there were also men who took part in the great struggle whose closing years found them humble and devoted adherents of the Catholic church. The Catholics in the country wore all Whigs, and the Catholics of Canada were favorable, ready to become our fellow-citizens. To sustain American in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

iJgyjPIJ- ,yy w'jpf- 'fiiyfigfyy'y 'y Tiltf INDIAN ADVOCATE. 87 i ) r To my palefaced brothers and sisters J am now going to tell it. In the days when this grand country of ours was but a great forest inhabited only by us and wild beasts, there lived a great and good man whose name was Weniboshu. He was alone. He had neither wife nor family. His brothers and sisters, he said, were those who needed his services. So he traversed the country, minis tering to man and beast alike. lie was supernatural, having the power of transformation at his pleasure. Who his father and mother were and from whence he came was a mystery never solved. He lived from century to century undisturbed by Father Time, and s the Indians came and wont and yeaid rolled by ho still lived on until there came a time that they were not what they should have been, and the wrath of the Great Spirit was great against them. In a vision one night he appeared to Weniboshu with the command to "arise and prepare for the terri...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

n3" "-" ifpwprw 88 THE INDAIN ADVOCATE. i I. 3 ', 1tc Indian Advocate Is a llevlew, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plead the cause of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Mission, (Avoca P. 0.) Okla. Ter. ArrnovED by Right Rev. TIIEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar ArosTouc of Oklahoma and Indian Territory. Subscriptions 50 Cents per Year. Single Copies 16 Cents. OCTOBER, 1895. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. If wishes were things, the devil wouldn't have many in his company below. No secret socie...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 89 An able writer gives utterance to the following valuable secret: "This look ing forward to enjoyment don't pay. From what I know of it, I would as soon chase butterflies for a living, or bottle up moonshine for cloudy nights. The only way to be happy is to take the drops of happiness as God gives them to us every day of our lives." In Vol. VI., No. 3, October, 1894, the Advocate gave' a short sketch of the mission among the Choctaw In dians in the diocese of Natphez, Miss. Founded by Mgr. Jans- sens, now Archbishop of New Orleans, La. Fos tered by the present Bi shop, Mgr. Heslin, this interesting mission, under the direction of Very Rev. Fr. Bekkers, has devel oped into a beautiful tree in the garden of the Most High. The Advocate in this issue presents one of the fruits of this tree. Sacred Heart may well feel proud in having un der her care a number of Indian boys whose good behavior, brilliant mental qualities, indicate a suc cessful career in the fu ture...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

"tsj 90 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. t hjr According to the latest returns of the Indian office there tire 24S,253 Indians in the United States, exclusive of Alaska. Of these 133,417 are those living on reservations, 28,G32 of whom support themselves. The total of self supporting Indians is 212,900. With men the unpardonable sin is ingratitude. In fact let us invoke the common instinct of humanity. His torians turn aside to point its moral; poets exhaust their imaginations for similitudes of horror and disgust. That man may last, but never lives, Who much receives, but nothing gives; Whom none can love, whom none can thank, Creation's blot, creation's blank. And while the cynic sneers at his race because of it, the progressist would fain ignore the sneer. For, creatures of heaven as we are, we begin to feel our kinship with the beasts of the field ah, no ! for even "the ox knoweth his owner, and the ass, his master's crib." Nature shall scarce furnish us with an analogue for the ingrate. In...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

Fwsr y riHliAVTSTtSS .FWWBl. "-". v. r TfT INDIAN ADVOCATE. 91 nighted monks in the Middle Ages were the preservers and the guardians of learning. What a tremendous lie Pro testantism invented the only thing it ever did invent to bolster up it spuri ous claim to enlightenment and pro gress, when it falsified history into one vast conspiracy against truth and the Catholic Church ! It is an old saying " that the mills of the gods grind slowly but surely." In this part of the country however the divorce mills grind very fast. Local papers report that, over five hundred cases of divorce were granted in Okla homa Territory last year. The "new" woman (whatever that is) and the divorce courts come into prominence at the same time and for the same reason. Verily, our world, at least our part of it, is sick unto death. The process of decay and disintegration is busy at its vitals. Mr. Shea takes front rank, and as a financier ho is equal to any in the South-west. He is a practical Catholic a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

! W .-.jpsMivpTiry x:m!'fri'7w?7KV, spsp15tptw7,,wj mf"s 3jHypypw 'f - 98 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Nothing disturbs that serene stillness, which is certainly not the stillness of death. A heart' quarrel is an impos sibility. Whatever we may do or say, they never get cross with us, or call us objectionable names. All this is undeniably irritating. It is quite re freshing to pass from the company of one of these to a warm, full-blooded individual of susceptible passions. It is a treat to feel that the hand which grasps ours could, if need be, strike hard. Tt may sound very paganish to say so, but we do love a little spice of human nature. Sturdy truth and faithfulness generally lie behind some capability of honest anger. We know that those friends who often seem most cross and irritable are really our stanch est and most reliable. Not that bad temper in itself can ever be an admirable thing, but that it is often accompanied by very sterling qualities. It generally coexists, with strength ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

'wwppt? THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 9S X & The Flag on the Capitol." Several of our contemporaries last year reprinted a very beautiful poem which was published anony mously in a "Washington journal duiing the "heated-period" of the "Know-Nothing" schism. It was given under the heading of " Lines Written under the Flag of the Capitol, by an American Catholic Priest;" but the papers which have re published it either ignore or do not appear to be aware of the fact that the "Lines" were written by the Rev. Charles C. IMbo, D. D., the late lamented and respected pastor of the Church of St. Charles Borromeo, Brooklyn, who had been educated and brought up, till his ordination as a priest, in the family of Charles Carroll of Carrollton one of the foremost and last survivors of the Signers of the Declaration of American Independence. It seems opportune to reproduce it at this time: LINES WRITTEN UNDKR THE FLAG OF THE CAPITOL. By an Amemcan Cvtiiomc PitiKsr. They say 1 do not love thee, Flag of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

FSJTWS'T W 04 TJE? INDIAN ADVOCATE. again when the fire begins to grow fervent. Not many hicos, as the white people are called, are accorded the privilege of attending these ceremonies, but as we stand well with one of the wise men of the tribe, we were invited to be present. As soon as we could swallow our dinners we started for the place, and were guided there by the wailings of the friends of the departed, consisting of every man, woman and child present at the festivities. You can see the reasonableness of my call ing it by such a name when you are told that the affair concludes by the killing and eating of all the horses of the departed, and every one goes to his own hut feeling that he has enjoyed himself greatly. The Mojaves believe in demonstrat ing their feelings through the agency of the mouth and limbs and this wo man, being much loved, the mourners were many and their grief could be heard a mile away. If ever you have heard a pack of coyotes howling forth their misery in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 95 morcial Company, who has recently re turned from a long sojourn in Alaska, during which he visited and inspected most of the missions along the Yukon, says that the school at Kozirefski is by far the best in the country. By means of that three-legged instrument to the children so fearfully made he procured an album full of photographs, and a deal of interesting and curious infor mation about the children's mammas and papas, and the place they live in. Alaska is a green and beautiful country during the ninety odd days of pleasant weather. At St. Michael, the old Russian set tlement at the mouth of the Yukon, Mr. Gerstel boarded one of the little steamers of the Alaska Commercial Company and started up the great riv er. The gold fields are fully 1500 miles away twice the length of California and mountains 6000 and 7000 feet high, alternating with great plains, where the stream spreads out among numerous islands, occupy the inter vening country. Five hundred mil...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

'Tv'P,-5l' 00 TiT.E INDIAN ADVOCATE. - -. To speak English and nothing but English and not to believe in the sup erstitions of their parents are, how ever, the two things that are regarded of the greatest importance in the edu cation of the pupils. The mention of a few of the leading peculiarities of the Indians of the Yukon will at once ex plain and justify the latter rather sing ular requirement. Unlike most of the tribes of the west ern hemisphere, the Yukon Indians have no chiefs and no government. This is an advantage, in so far as it prevents tribal wars. But each village has a medicine man, or shaman, and a great nuisance he is, although the In dians do not seem to know it. The shaman, however, knows everything worth knowing. He peers into the future. He sees fish going and storms coming. He exorcises devils and di sease, and these inspirations come to him in slumber deep. Hence he slum bers a great deal. His position being what more southern people are wont to denominate "so...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

vi$$w tw "! "Sfrj-T WJ"- "TW""-!!" M1 INDIAN ADVOCATE. 97 V 3igel ofpargatory. HOW MANY SWKKT RKMtMHCKNCEH THIH TITI.I1 HKOAI.t.H TO A OHMHTIAN MIND. A VOICE FROM PURGATORY. Forget mo not, forget mo not, most humbly I implore, The day of life for me is past, the time of merit o'er; But you can lift, but you can lift your hands in prayer for mo, Then give mo, friends, then give me, friends, your deepest sympathy. ' Recall how oft the just man falls, and pray, devoutly pray, That from my soul each earthly stain bo swiftly cleansed away: And you, my friends, at least, my friends, oh, moved to pity bo, Because the linger of the Lord is laid is laid on me. Remember, friends remember, friends, the blood that Jesus shed, It still upon the altar Hows for living and for dead, And He who wopt for Lazarus will surely pity me, And from this dreary prison-house will set my spirit free. Then mourn not, friends, then mourn not. friends, as those whose hope is lied, But follow past the silent grave...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

W&FW&fQIe'(M 98 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE best earthly interests, foolishly neg lected and imperilled his own salva tion; he suffers for having loved us too much. It may be a daughter whom God has recalled, perhaps because we did not wish to give her to Him; of whom we made an idol, encouraging her vanity, her worldliness, her foolish pleasures; we wished to control and regulate her piety, now she is tortured on our account. It may be a son, who neglected to practice his religion, and perhaps in so doing he but followed in our footsteps. We formed those tender souls in the earth's image, only, forgetting that they were first cast in the image of their Creator. It is a grievous chas tisement, but has it not been merited? And if we remember our friends, even our enemies, can we dwell in peace without thinking of our fellow citizens, our compatriots, all those who, coming within the sphere of our influence, may at this moment be suffering in Purga tory from the force of the bad examp...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 99 with her Son for the suffering souls. The angels and saints in Paradise also long and supplicate for them. Their angel guardians, who watched them so faithfully during life, their former companions now enjoying the bliss of heaven, long to be reunited to them. The mysterious communion of saints unites them here; together they hold the keys of Purgatory. Once more, let us use constantly our best efforts to shorten the time of their probation; let us never forget that they are the flesh of our flesh and the bone of our bone; that many are there through our participation; that every prayer and act of ours offered for their relief, if we be in a proper state of grace, cannot fail of a blessing from an all-just but also an all-merciful God. From what has been previously said it is conclusive, that we have the power to solace and deliver our deceased brethern from the fires of Purgatory. We know that the suffrages of- the universal Church continually unite in a ros...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

100 THE INDAIN ADVOCATE. motive. As we can succor our needy living brethren, so we can both the dead and the living by alms bestowed for them who have gone before. We may also reach the doors of Pur gatory through suffering. Like prayer, it is a means common to all, few escape it,, and it remains with ourselves either to murmur against its lessons or to re ceive them as helps to salvation for our selves and our departed friends. By participating in its fruits in a proper manner, we may open Heaven to num bers of waiting souls. Alas, how much do we lose by not having the courage to bear our sufferings with fortitude, by not possessing the bravery to offer it as a sacrifice of impetration. The fourth means is Holy Commun ion. The plenitude of its effects we know is only produced in those, who personally receive it. Actual and living graces for the obtaining of good things and the averting of evil, the remission of venial faults and of the temporal punishment incurred by them, many gif...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
x
Loading...
x
x