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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

POISON IVY. The recent death of a citizen of Washington, from poison ivy, runners the following, from Health, of interest. It may be valuable to many Ranch readers: "The poison ivy has three leaflets re sembling the foliage of the woodbine, but the latter has five leaflets. Both are glossy. On this coast the ivy is sometimes called poison oak, the leaves being shaped like those of the oak. It used to be said of these poisonous shrubs that the "effluvium" from them affected some people; but, since the ad vent of the germ theory, their poison ous qualities are attributed to the presence of bacteria which breed upon the tree or shrub, and are diffused in the air for some distance about it. In no other way can the numberless cases of poisoning be accounted for, where the persons are familiar with the harm ful shrubs and invariably shun them. "The favorite prescription of some of the medical fraternity was once, and with some is now, a preparation of sugar of lead. Undoubtedly this works...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

c THE STATE OF TRADE. [Continued from page 3. ver is already in the rick and the sec ond crop is well along. Being upon ir rigated land, no elements of failure can be descerned, and it may be con cluded that the usual number of cut tings will be made. On the non-irri gated lands, like those of the reserva tions, the grass has had the advantage of frequent i"ains almost up to the present time, so that the general hay crop of this district may be set down as an unusuall}' large one. With the shortage elsewhere, as out lined, the outlook for a brisk demand and good prices seems certain. Along with the potato grower, the hay farmer may be set down as a fortunate indi vidual; doubly so if he has stock to consume his crop, but sure at any rate for a good shipping demand. At last accounts hay was worth ijf2() per ton in California, and advancing. SOME ORNAMENTAL TREES. By R. S. Co*. It is well known .that nothing better illustrates the progress of our country, the advance in its civilizati...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

DITCHLETS. A gigantic irrigation scheme is pro jected for Texas. It is in the hands of Chicago, St. Paul and foreign capital ists. The main ditch will be 130 miles in length, with laterals covering over half a million acres. The ditch will begin in New Mexico, taking its sup ply from the Rio Grande river sixty miles north of El Paso, and terminat ing near Sierra Blanca. Buffalo Bill is constructing a ditch for irrigating 2,000 acres of his Nebras ka ranch land. The canal will be twenty miles long, with a bottom width of twenty feet. In Colorado over 3,000,000 acres are watered by irrigation. Is it true that pears do better than any other kind of fruit on alkoli soils? T. S. Van Dyke, a prominent writer in Irrigation Age,says that it is certain that cultivation produces much of its effects by aerating- the ground. "The soil must have air, and the best results are impossible without it. Worse than this. Fairly good results are impos sible without it unless on soils so open as to be na...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

8 THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It PRICK —$1.00 a year in advance. Worth —Two gold dollars. MONTHLY Edition. SOe. a year. Conducted by K. H. Lin by. Managing Editor, W. W. Cokhktt. Published by the YAKIMA PLTBLIHINO COMPANY. EDITORIAL OFKICKS: NORTH YAKIMA. WASHINGTON. business offices: North Yakiina. Yakiina: Avenue. Seattle, Room 7, Hinckley liliwk. Tacoinu, 1113 Piielttc Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. Do not fail to have a step-ladder or two about the premises. Hardly a week passes upon the ranch that one may not be used to advantage. The bees should be doing effective work in these alfalfa and clover days. TiiK Ranch will be pleased to hear from the bee men regarding the sea son. All sorts of bee. information is in order. Competent medical authorities say, boil all drinking water during the summer and autumn months. The filter is a good thing to remove many impurities, but it does not eradicate them all. Beware of impure ice also. Theirost did even less real i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

YAKIMA HOP GROWERS MEET. There was a full attendance at the meeting- of the Yakima Hop Growers' association on last Saturday; Presi dent L,esh in the chair. It was a thor oughly business-like meeting- of busi ness men. Secretary Ross read and compiled the reports of hop acreage from the different districts as follows, sards planted this year not included, the report being simply to form a basis for engaging pickers: District. Old Yearling Yards. Yards. North Yakima 349 59 Natchees l l>s 11 Cowychie 116 Upper Ahtanum.... 177 33 Lower Ahtanum.... 290 37# Wide Hollow 142 1104 Tampico 232 28 Parker Bottom 472 65 Moxee 330 204 Total 2,303 606 Fuller returns will increase this to tal of yards to be picked this year to something over 3,000 acres. Discussion showed difference of opin ion as to the number of pickers re quired. Mr. Weed, with his large dry ing capacity, can use four to five per acre; Mr. Eglin and others with small er kilns from two to three and one half. The average would...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

10 THE INTERVIEWER. A Drive to Old Town nnd a Visit to Mr Carpenter's New Yakima Cheese Fac tory—A Random Talk by the Way—Mar keting vs. Feeding Hay—Making the Cheese—Utilizing the Whey—Breed of Cows, etc., etc. One day the first of the week I was invited to accompany \V. H. Carpenter on a drive to his new cheese factory at Yakima City. An opportunity of this kind is usually accepted. Such was the case in this instance. It was a beauti ful morning and a lovely drive. The country is at its best now, everything fresh, green and vigorous. A noticeable feature of the landscape is the long- ricks of alfalfa from the first cutting-. They loom up in every meadow, and other acres are crowded with cocks from the windrows, ready to supplement the ricks already estab lished, or to form new ones. The fodder crop is immense, and the thought that sug-g-ested itself to my companion was that it is a great pity that there are not more cows here to consume it. You think then that there is more money ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

have not purchased the apparatus as yet. You have had considerable experi ence with cows, what is the breed of your choice? lam satisfied that the Holstein is an excellent dairy animal. I have found some of the Shorthorns excellent. lam now using a fine Hol stein bull upon my mixed lot of cows. I like the Jersey for a family cow, but for cheese making- or butter making on a larger scale Ido not consider it the best. POULTRY RANCH. [Our Poultry Editor in Hurry H. Collier, No, 9f>o C street. Tacoma. AddresH him oil ull Poultry matters.! STUFFING POULTRY. The Way They Do It in England—The Food Used in Filling the Crops. Near Horsham, England, is an ex tensive establishment for fattening poultry for market. A gentleman who visited it recently describes the pro cess in a London journal. The cramming house is capable of accommodating a total of 632 fowls, and the birds enter upon this, the last stage of their career, at ages ranging from four to seven months. The pens or cages are arra...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

12 LET'S GO FISHING. ••There never irasa fisherman, so I've heard the old folks s;iy, Wboeaughi theblgfeal Itak—•lwmjri sure to get away ! And it's just as true in treating M it is in other things. That blessings seem the l>iijrlitcst wlieii they spread their golden wings And soar where you citn'l touch tliem, hut only stand and wish That you had them in your basket wit h the other little fish. If wishes were hut fishes, how your heart would swell with pride As you landed that three-pounder, where The old Trout Hide. "Yet. after a'l, the sportsman, though he doesn't cateli his lish. Catches all the life and sunshine thai a happy heart can wish; Old MotherNatttre takes him ami smoothes life's wrinkles out, So get your rod and basket, for this morning's made for trout. You'll go back to you labor, to your dry and musty books. In your soul a little laughter, of the laughter of the brooks. In your heart a little singing, like the singing of a bride. And you get your Inspiration where...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

that was raging in mv brain. That in some extraordinary way I had been carried home while I was unconscious I could not doubt, yet what was to be the outcome of this unheard-of adven ture? I could not imagine. As I re gained my presence of mind, however, my thoughts returned to Walter, and my overwhelming desire was to see him at once while there was yet time. I ran to the front of the station, wild with impatience to obtain a hack, but as the first man I accosted took no no tice of me, I passed to the next. I spoke, and although he looked directly at me, he paid not the slightest atten tion to my remark. With a first faint glimmering of the truth I brushed past him and stepped inside the car riage. Hardly had I done so when a lady entered and seated herself by my side. In an instant everything became clear as day, and I sprang out and rushed up the street muttering to my self, "I am spirit! I am spirit!" At last I began to understand my condi tion, and with it came the more ab sorb...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

11 THE TWENTY-THIRD SEANCE. [Continued from page 13.] make the trial, at all events, and if so, the sooner the better, we both thought, for it seemed very doubtful if my op portunity would last very long. I hardly believed, however, that I could communicate with them if I should reach them. We couldn't part again, however, without another long talk. We were both tremulous with excitement even 3'et, and the suspense we were in as to the outcome of the affair kept us ner vous with apprehension that the de nouement might come at any time. When every farewell was said Walter abruptly broke away and threw him self into a chair and pillowed his head upon his arms. He could never bear to look back after once parting—and I ran out into the street with the sensa tion of impending change nerving me to hasten toward my old home. When I turned the corner I saw that the house was all dark, with the ex ception of windows on the upper floor. As I approached I grew fainter; every step nearer the ho...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

Tansy For Ants. A sure remedy for these summer pests is here outlined. Big-, fat, black antimires and little, lean, scurrying red ants have put in their appearance at our house for the past few summers, taking possessson of every pantry and cellar shelf where food is kept and per sistently remaining until frost comes. I have tried washing the shelves in alum water, and circling the sugar bucket and cake buckets with chalk marks, thick and broad, to strand the toTKging, and sifted sponges full of •ngtir, and, when filled with victims, have plung-ed them into hot water. I have put sulphur bags and borax lumps and cedar chips and tarred paper strips in my cupboards and ice chest, but with no other result than to see the black and red ants scampering as lively as ever over the supposed exter minator. "Why don't you try tansy?" the new g-irl said one morning- last spring-. :'Mother always drives them off by putting- tansy leaves on her shelves." I had little faith in the bundle of green-...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

16 Irrigation is King mid w& are the People! Our great $75,000 cash pumping plant is in operation, irrigating- 3,000 acres of the finest land under the sun. Prosscr is the commercial town of the lower Yakima valley. 50,000 sheep are sheared here. The great Horse Heaven wheat and stock country of 400,000 acres is at our backs. The wonderful Sunnyside region is before us. The Northern Pacific railroad runs through our midst. A Now we are going to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will ■^^^^^p *Now we itself. We to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will ,^^^^^ take care of itself. We are yoing to show our opportunities honestly and truth- r^\ fully, and we are going to help the people who come here. No fairy tales will ■ > ' ■ J~?" :: -■ ■ *■'■■■ be told. We are here to win, and those who come and stay with us will win, too. We will meet you half way on any fair proposition. Come and see us and our splendid country and opportunities will grow on you, and ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 11 August 1894

THE RHNCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR WEEKLY VOL. 1. NO. 30. PROSPECTS. Oh, the folly of it—and the FOLLY ought to be spelled out with big letters. I refer to the careless shipping that is still indulged in by fruit growers, and even by some shipping associations t Yes, make it plural, and spell it follies. First is the lack of proper selection and grading, which packs over-ripe fruits, which are rotten fruits when they get to market. Then comes the mixture of sizes, and even of varieties. All this equals low price, or no price. Loose packing and packing in old crates and boxes add to the list of poverty boomers that are the"returns" made to the man for whom "farmin' don't pay." Again, some intelligent growers, who ought to sense a busi ness situation, fail to join the coopera tive work of a shipping association, which stops ruinous competition, and, instead, ship individually to seperate handlers in the same market, and thereby break the prices themselves on their own products, when cooperat...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 11 August 1894

2 sess, and which, if surrendered, will surely be used to close the door of ad- vancement against such as they, and to fix new disabilities and burdens upon them till all of liberty shall be lost." * * * The editor's visit to the splendid orchards of Walla Walla, probably the finest in the whole northwest, his in terviews with Dr. Blalock and W. S. Offner, and also a careful inspection of the state penetentiary and the re markable results of the work of Ward en Coblenz, who has shown marked executive ability, and the great suc cess of his operation of the jute mill in supplying1 Washington farmers with grain bags, hop sacking and twine— all this is crowded out of this issue but will appear in good time and should be of special interest to readers of The Ranch. # * * Interest in irrigation is growing rap idly in all states west of the Missouri river. The drouth of years past, topped by the present great drouth in lowa and surrounding states, has taught the farmers that the natural wa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 11 August 1894

Ahtanum Academy and Business Institute J Will Open Its Third Annual Session September 18. - If You Desire a Thorough Practical Education Attend Ahtanum Academy and Business Institute. The climate is dry and healthful and the surroundings very pleasant. Especial attention is paid to preparing students for teachers' examinations and training- in methods of teach- ing. Students fairly prepared can complete the commercial course in from two to three Bk^k terms. All students are under the immediate care of the principal and preceptress. r^H^} The following courses are offered: Classical, Scientific, Normal, Musical, Business, Short- ] hand and Typewriting. Classes in English, German, Latin and Greek, Algebra, Geometry, A Mental and Practical Arithmetic, Zoology, Physiology, Botany, Philosophy, Astronomy, Mm. Psychology, Grammar, Composition, Rhetoric, Literature, Geography, U. S. History, Gen- ,^PPk eral History, Civil Government, Physical Geography, Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Cora- ML HHk...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 11 August 1894

4 STOCK AND DAIRY NOTES. A condensed milk factory company has been incorporated at Hillsboro, Oregon. As the exports to Asia of condensed milk equal a million dollars a year, aside from the large home con sumption, the importance of this Hills boro project is easy to see. That Yakima valley condensed milk factory, talked of for Prosser, had bet ter get started soon, or Oregon will come in ahead. There is room, how ever, for both Hillsboro and Prosser on that proposition. There are still about 1,000,000 bushels of old wheat in eastern Washington that would not net over 14 cents a bushel. Fed to hogs it would be worth 25 to 50 cents, according to the price of pork. Unfortunately there are very few hogs in that section. But why not keep the old wheat and breed the hogs to eat it up? That would pay a big in terest on the outlay. An Illinois man has a large amount of wheat which he is grinding and making into swill for hogs, and mixing with cut "roughness" for other stock, and declares t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 11 August 1894

First National Bank, NORTH YAKIMA, WASH. Capital and Surplus, $127,000. J. R. LEWIS, President. OH AS. CARPENTER, V. Pres. VV. L. STEINWEG, Cashier. HENRY TEAL, Asst. Cash. Information Regarding Yakiina County Cheerfully Given. Smith Fruit Company, COMMISSION MERCHANTS. Wholesale dealers and shippers . and ** VEGETABLES 92 and 94 East Third St., ST. PAUL, • - MINNESOTA Send your Fruit and Produce to KITTITAS & YAKIMA COMMISSION COMPANY. J. B. FOG ARTY, President, W. E. HARLAN, Manager. We want to sell your Fruit, Melons.JPotatoes, Hay, etc. 915 West St., SEATTLE, WASH. AC. FRY CO., Commission Merchants, —DEALERS IN— Green and Dried Fruits, Vegetables, Butter, Cheese, Poultry, Veal, Hogs, Honey. Hay and Grain handed in car load lots on small commission. Consignments and corre spondence solicited. References: Mer chant's National Bank, Plekens, Fulton & Co. 923 West St., Seattle, Wash. Tacoma Commission Go. W. R. BRADLEY, Manager. Wholesale dealers in Foreign and Domestic Frui...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 11 August 1894

<} WASHINGTON State Weatheir J^epoFtei* Published Monthly In The Ranch. Henry F. Alciatore, . Editor Director Washington Weather service, SEATTLE, WASH. G. W. Pancoast, ... Ist Ass-t. E. C. Bradnkr, ... 2nd Asst. JULY WEATHBR IN WASHINGTON. A perfectly normal temperature and small rainfall were the chief charac teristics of the weather during- July, 1894. An average of all the monthly mean temperatures gives the state a mean of 65.4 degrees, which is only three-tenths of a degree colder than the normal July temperature. In 1890 the mean state temperature was 63.9; in 1861 it was 66.2; in 1892 it was 62.8, and in 1893 it was 63.9. The warmest place this time was Kennewick, Yaki ma county, with a monthly mean tem perature of 79.4 degrees. For the cold est weather we find Tatoosh Island with a mean of only 55 degrees. At Sulphur Springs, Franklin county, the thermometer rose to 106 degrees on the afternoon of the 24rd; this was the highest recorded temperature in the state. It was o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 11 August 1894

There were 23 artesian wells sunk in South Dakota last year, and about as many more are under way or in pros pect. Some one computes that over an area of 25.000 square miles there is artesian water enough to keep up a thousand-gallon-a-minute well for every five square miles, or six inches a year over the entire surface. Can any one compute what such wells over South Dakota would have been worth the past month? —Farmer's Review. For a good dairy cow don't hang- to the idea that she must be plump and smooth, that her back should be straight and her ribs "well sprung." These points are well enough for men • who run a dairy for their health, but if you are interested in the profits see that she is deep through the middle— never mind if she is slab-sided—is not blocky or meaty, has a light shoulder, sharp withers, is ewe-necked and cat- « hammed. These were the kind that did the business at the world's fair, Summary of Meteorological Reports by Voluntary Observers of the Washington Weat...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 11 August 1894

(i WASHINGTON State Wcathcf Published Monthly in The Ranch. Henry F. Alciatore, . Editor Director Washington Weather service, SEATTLE, WASH. G. W. Paneo ast, . . . lstAss-t. £. C. Bradner, ... 2nd Asst. JULY WEATHER IN WASHINGTON. A perfectly normal temperature and small rainfall were the chief charac teristics of the weather during- July, 1894. An average of all the monthly mean temperatures gives the state a mean of 65.4 degrees, which is only three-tenths of a degree colder than the normal July temperature. In 1890 the mean state temperature was 63.9; in 1861 it was 66.2; in 1892 it was 62.8, and in 1893 it was 63.9. The warmest place this time was Kennewick, Yaki ma county, with a monthly mean tem perature of 79.4 degrees. For the cold est weather we find Tatoosh Island with a mean of only 55 degrees. At Sulphur Springs, Franklin county, the thermometer rose to 106 degrees on the afternoon of the 24rd; this was the highest recorded temperature in the state. It was on the morning...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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