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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 26 October 1918

ily welcome and the boys after dark often annoyed the family. It was a year there after before the neighbors discovered that though thei rskins were dark they were ideal citizens and far more desirable than some of the whites. Condemn no one until you have thoroughly investigated the accused. DALLYING WITH SUFFRAGE From The Public No greater reason was ever given for the adoption of the Federal Suffrage Amend ment than the simple fact of its defeat in the Senate. When thirty-one men in the United States Senate are so blind to the trend of events as to vote against the ex tension of the franchise to American women at a time when nations all over the world are admitting women to the full rights of citizenship, it shows the imperative need of the very influence that is now denied ex pression. The defeat of the Amendment at this time is doubly unfortunate. It brings an unnecessary issue into the November elections, to the confusion of others that are still to be decided; and it tends to...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 26 October 1918

STOLEN FROM THIEVES "Queer, isn't it?" "What?" "You plant the eyes of the potatoes, and the ears of the corn." Mrs. .Jones: "Lookee, CJeorge, didn't I tell you my boy'd make the folks open their mouths when he got to Chicago?" Mrs. .Johnson: "So you did, an' has he done it .'" Mrs. .Jones: "Sure thing. He's started business as a dentist." The burglar had just t)egun his term and was assigned to work in the broom factory. Near him was an oldish man who studied him intently and seemed to be awaiting an opportunity to say something. It came when the overseer was at the ice-water tank. "How long fire yon in for?" he whis pered. "Twelve years," replied the newcomer. The veteran looked around nervously and thrust ;i letter in the burglar's hand. "I'm in for life," lie said. "Mail this when you get out." He —"1 haven't done a day's work in two years." She —"You ought to be ashamed of your self." He — "Oh, no. T'm a night-watchman in a bank." Rebecca — "Do you understand the lan guage of ma...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 November 1918

J@agtfch&^Me&6fa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. it is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS Hayden J. Richardson has sold his lease hold of the Douglas apartments and for the time being he will sleep with one eye open watching the movements of the war de par...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 November 1918

NEXT TUESDAY'S ELECTION As to the Supreme Court candidates Cay ton's Weekly has not very greatly changed its opinion from what it was one week ago. For the long term it recommends to its readers the unanimous support of Wallace Mount and John F. Main, both men of the highest type and life long Republicans. Organized labor has made a nasty and "un warranted fight on both of these men and it is the unqualified duty of every patriotic voter to give to them his or her most loyal support. Judges Mount and Main's decisions in the past which have invoked the wrath of union labor may not have been to the liking of the radicals of organized labor nor have their decisions always been to the liking of many others, but in deciding a case it must be in favor of one side or the other and the fellow that loses in a legal contest most always wants to "cuss" some body and the judge on the bench seems the most plausable one to cuss. The true blue American, after a sober second thought, thusly reasons...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 November 1918

and their prediction came true. At the late primary election he was nominated over his competitor, who was backed by his office precedent. Mr. Games will be elected treasurer of King county next Tuesday and for two years he will be the custodian of not less than eighteen million dollars annually. Mr. Games is a man that is the same yester day, today and tomorrow and in attending to the duties of his office all men look alike to hime. Vote for Wm. A. Games. This write up of Mr. Games has been done at the WM. A. GAINES Candidate for County Treasurer request of the King County Colored Repub lican Club, the active membership of which worked for his nomination and are equally solicitious about his election next Tuesday. Dr. Cardwell and A. R. Bonner, respectively secretary and treasurer of the club, will be pleased to tell you more about Mr. Games, if you will but call them up. Be careful, Mr. Voter to not get mixed up when you go to cast your vote for prose cuting attorney of King count...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 2 November 1918

years a member of the senate, and his rec ord is clear. If he ever did anything as a representative that did not seem in accord with public sentiment he immediately re versed himself and endeavored to represent the sentiment of the people irrespective of his own. Cnyton's Weekly does not hesi tate to s;iy William Wray is far superior to A. B. Flagg and it truly hopes that every one of its readers in that district, and they are many, will vote for him in preference 1o his Democratic opponent, who has heen an unsuccessful candidate for some kind of an office at every election held in Seattle for the past twenty-five years. ]f the friends of E. Ileister Guie will rally strong 1o his support and give him a record breaking vote he will have little or no trouble in landing the speakership job when the next legislature convenes. He is a parli menterian of the highest type and if elected speaker will cause the legislature to dispatch more business while in the chair than it has done the thr...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 November 1918

J&uf2ch& PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TE TEFIT<rKri!: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South ELECTION POST MORTEMS Prior to the late election Cayton's Weekly said "the voters all over the North are thoroughly disgusted with the rule of the Democratic party and they will show thei...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 November 1918

With Germany suppressed the next dis turbing element of the world will be Japan, who in the war just closed professed friend ship for the Allies, yet turned not her hand to assist them and it is the private opinion of the editor hereof that had Germany ever showed any signs of success Germany and Japan would have co-jointly seized Russia and split it fifty-fifty between them. Japan we fear is a snake in the grass. Because Ed Cudihee suported P. J. Mc- Cormick for sheriff Mrs. Ed Cudihee sup ported Jack Stringer, but despite the fact Mrs. Cudihee won out, yet she has begun divorce proceedings against her "lord and master." Evidently she plans to give "my lord Jind master" a touch of high life for daring to have a mind of his own, and, yet for that we love them. In this country the past, of anyone, how ever shady, is very soon forgotten and noth ing more clearly demonstrates that than the election of Frank Cotterill as a member of the next legislature. Frank may prove to be just.as us...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 November 1918

couple of platoons, the supposed German positions along the creek were stormed and taken. The French general was delighted. Finally he said, 'My oldest veterans could do it no better, even if they were warned it was on the program, and your boys did that extemporaneously.' The general re membered the review, and a few days later these colored chaps from Chicago received a fine letter from him, congratulating them on their esprit de corps and their work. "It was interesting to see how these col- THOMAS DOBSON Who, like his running mate, walloped John Mullane in the primaries and then re peated the dose last Tuesday. Republican today and Democrat tomorrow and all for the sake of getting an office is poor policy. ored boys mixed with the French inhabi tants of the village with whom the Ameri cans were billeted. The French folk like them and felt highly pleased at the way they learned French. They are getting ex tremely fluent, and it fits entirely with their scheme of things to use all...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 9 November 1918

MUSIC PUBLISHING HOUSES (By Lester A. Walton) Two weeks ago, in renewing his subscrip tion for The Age, AVilliam R. Holland, who resides in Seattle, Wash., enclosed an addi tional $1 with the request that he be for warded songs written by members of the race. I now have before me a second letter from Mr. Holland asking that he be advised where he can secure musical numbers fea tured this season by our representative col ored shows. Colored composers, one and all, should doff their hats to Mr. Holland. He is a doer, not a talker. Neither would it be amiss for our advocates of race co-operation to point out Mr. Holland as a shining example of one who practices what he preaches. If there were just 100,000 more William R. Hollands out of the twelve million col ored Americans it would not be a very long time before the race could boast of music publishing houses in New York where tal ented young men and women might find an avenue for the exploitation of their musical compositions. In the...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 November 1918

J@cuftch&Jzee&g PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOR CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TE T "RPTTOTTE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS In another column hereof is an article de scribing the new method of cotton picking, which is attracting considerable attention. Just now cotton is king, the hig...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 November 1918

VACUUM-PICKED COTTON Literary Digest Col lon is now gathered in the Imperial Valley of California by a device that works on the principle of the vacuum-cleaner. It is asserted that cotton picked by it is clean er than that picked by hand and that by its ;iid jiii inexperienced laborer can work three or four times as fast as experts in the old methods. The machine Weighs but 1,000 pounds, and is easily moved. Around its liulit skeleton are a 300-pound, 16-horse- Itower engine, ;i suction pump for the nozles, and ;i centrifugal separator for parting the cotton from leaves, sticks, and other debris taken in by the picking nozlei. These nozles are live in number, at the end of light, 18 --foot rubber pies connected with an 8-foot tube running transversely over the machine. To quote from an article in The Scientific American (New York, October 19): "The powerful suction pump on the ma chine endeavors constantly to keep the pick inn 1 pics in a state of vacuum, wherefore, when the no/lc i...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 November 1918

sia, the man who bears the same relation to Russian literature that Shakespeare bears to English literature. Alexander Pushkin was born at Moscow in 1799. He had no struggle with poverty, nor did he seem to have any struggle for recognition. As one of his biographers puts it, "He walked into the Hall of Fame as naturally as a young heir steps into his law ful inheritance." When he was thirteen years old he went to school at the Lyceum of Tsarskoe Selo. When he was sixteen he declaimed his "Recollections of Tsarsko Selo" in public at the Lyceum examination, and was immediately acclaimed as a poet. All that Pushkin accomplished he accom plished within a short lifetime; for he was only thirty-eight when he was led unto an unfortunate duel in which he was mortally wounded. An officer in the Russian army had been flirting with his wife. Pushkin received an anonymous letter, and thinking that this officer was the author of it, wrote him a violent letter which, according to the custom of t...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 November 1918

Shock Was Too Severe—Once there was a woman who moved into an apartment and found everything swept and scrubbed and as clean as if she had done it herself. The shock left her lying helpless on the floor, hill soon she managed to drag herself to the telephone' where, her strength fast ebbing away, she gave central a mimmber. Pres ently a voice came over the telephone. "I just wanted to tell you," said the suffering woman, "how thankful I am to find the apartment in such lovely condition. You are one in a million, and I shall never for got-" There was a sudden clatter at the other end of the line. The woman who had just moved out of the apartment fell to the floor with a crash, tearing the telephone connec tions from their fastenings. She had swoon ed, for tho she had cleaned apartments an nually since her wedding-day, no succeed ing tenant had ever admitted it before. They met in the hospital three weeks later, in a ward marked "Quiet." Both re covered slowly and whiled away the lon&...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 November 1918

J&ufZch& imee£&( PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up.'' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOTO CAYTON..Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, "'Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TE TJ3PKOTWB: BEACON" l<»10 Office 303 22nd Aye. South HAWTHORNE'S HALUCINATION As though it was not disgrace and humili ation enough for the citizens of Seattle to give "Kunnel" Hawthorne the large vote they did, still yet the...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 November 1918

than .just black men will be your steady customers. If you think you see an oppor tunity to start a business in a community made up entirely of white citizens go to it just as quickly as if they were all colored citizens. Very beautiful and impressive were the ceremonies in connection with the funeral of Mrs. Lenora C. Brown, held at Grace Pres byterian Church Monday, November 18. Rev. Barber officiated and Doctors Carter, Gra ham and Johnson, the former pastors, and Dr. Forbes, the founder and "father" of the church, participated in the services. Before her illness Mrs. Brown was well-known for her activity in the religious and social cir cles of the city. Her father, Adrian Mon tier, husband, Richard S. Brown, and three children mourn her demise. The wjir is over! Peace, whether endur ing or transient, is upon us. The world now speaks in terms of re-construction, plans for the mystic future. One great fact the war has brought out: that several, many, nations though racially, econo...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 November 1918

ment, is now in Seattle and not having seen him, he must be lost, strayed or stolen. Cayton's Weekly is not "the leading colored paper," but a darn good weekly. Big Bill Sweeney is going to spring a sur prise on the public in the near future. Oscar Collins is "bone dry." Now laugh, confound you, as though it is not so. Mrs. Black (A. R.) is figuring on having Black's Addition to the City of Seattle put on the real estate market. Rev. W. D. Carter having been seen with all of five dollars in his purse, must con template going into the banking business. THE HORIZON (From The Crisis) Music and Art Bertha Lhambers, o Lynchburg, Va., who has been attending the Columbia University Summer School of Music, was asked to teach the class of forty students a Negro melody. She taught "Listen to the Lambs," by R. Nathaniel Dett, and was highly commended. Sylvia E. Lyons, a fourteen year old col ored girl, of Boston, Mass., and piano pupil of Mrs. Ancrum Forster, won a first prize in the September...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 November 1918

Provincial Commissioner of that colony. Jacob silv.inus Bruee-Vanderpuye, Bar rister-at-Law, has boon made Gyasie Meiatse to one of the native chiefs of Accra, Wa. Africa, ;i position of great importance. In Johannesburg, the Mineworkers' ITnion lias expressed itself against the re moval of the color bar, saying that the Union would object to the Government run ning mines with colored labor, including colored men with natives. They were fi^ht ing for fl white South Africa. Ghetto Carl J. Murphy, editor of the Afro-Amer ican, Baltimore, Md., was charged with "disorderly conduct," arrested and fined $26.45 for refusing to be "Jim-Crowed" on a train in the W. B. & A. Station, sched uled for Washington. A case has been start ed against the railroad company. At the Hog Island Shipyards, where col ored riveters made championship records, (•outinued effort is being made to keep Ne groes from working as mechanics and to use them as common laborers. 11 is charged that in the Canal Zone w...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 November 1918

J@agfZch&^ee^( PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. it is open to the towns and communities of the •tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TEfEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South DECLINED WITHOUT THANKS It is gracious on the part of The Spec tator, of London, to suggest that instead of turning the German colonies over to inter national control they be placed under the protection...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 November 1918

private returns and goes to Georgia in quest of his mother, he will be told, she got im pudent to white men when she protested against her husband and his father being lynched and for her impudence she was hung up by her feet and while hanging was cut open and the unborn babe that fell from her womb was stamped into mince meat by the men fighting to make the world safe for democracy. And as in these cases so with hundreds of others, who have been lynched while the boys were fighting bravely over there. Who, pray, is going to speak for the black man of the United States that he share some of the good things that will be prepared at the coming peace table? Cer tainly President Wilson will not do so, be cause all the above horrors have been per petrated almost within his presence and he made no protest or effort to prevent it. Certainly Col. E. M. House, one of the peace delegates from this country, will not do so because he is a Texas buccaneer and is satisfied that some of the "nigge...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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