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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

one operator who lost a thousand head and of others who had three or four hundred die from this trouble. "Alfalfa is now the chief sheep feed in Idaho. We grow big crops of that nay , even bigger than many farmers down in this section turn in. I re alized seven tons to the acre on a well-irrigated ranch last season, and found myself when the winter came on with plenty of rough feed for stock. The hay sells for $6 to $8 in the stack out our way, so you may see 'it is highly prized as a sheep feed." THE SHEEP CANADA WANTS. At the recent great Canadian live 4ock and poultry exposition, Prof, .rrisdale, of the Central experimental farm, said: "The sheep industry is it the present time in a dormant con lltion in this country, but there will be a good awakening in the course of two or three years, and now is the time for the farmers to lay in a good flock of sheep at low prices. The sheep industry is a cheap one. and one that can be run in connec tion with all farms. It is very im portant...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

6 FIRST ESSENTIAL IN DAIRY. The first essential to success in dairying is a cow which will yield enough with proper feed and care to make a margin of profit above the cost of feed and care, and the second is to give her the proper feed and care which involves a careful study of feeding problems with a view to the use of the feeds which will give the best results in proportion to cost. The investigations of experiment sta tions, dairy farmers, creamery opera tors and others show conclusively that at least one-half of the cows kept in the United States for dairy purposes do not even pay for the food they t^at' estimating the cost of the food at its market value in the localities in which such cows are kept. A great advance has been made in the average quality of dairy cows since the Bab oock test was invented, and the im provement will be more marked in the future. This improvement will tend to lower the cost of dairy production and the man who fails to keep up with the procession in ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

crease in dairy products; while a diminished nutriment supply resulted in a decreased gain in live weight and a relative increase iv dairy products. The record for 190J-2 also shows that when a ration is short of nutriment because of excess bulk, the cows main tained their flow at the expense of live weight, and that it was not because of the shortage of any particular com ponent in the ration —for if such had been the case there would have been a decrease in the yield of milk be cause of lack of material for its pro duction." PLANT CARROTS FOR COWS. Carrots for dairy cows are more valuable than most dairymen realize, or they would pay more attention to them. They will take the place of ensilage to feed with alfalfa hay, and will go far to keep cows in good condition and maintain the milk flow when there is only prairie hay for feed. It has been said that for a horse four quarts a day are worth as much as two quarts of oats, but for a cow the carrots are worth propor tionately more ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

8 Horticultural Notes By F. Walden The subject of root gall is attracting a good deal of attention among orchardists. ( )ne of the troubles about this disease is the fact that it is but little understood. What is the cause and what is the remedy no one lias determined. That it is a fungus growth seems to be admitted, but what causes it seems not to be known. The vari ous experiment stations are giving atten tion to this disease and in due time we may expect to have some reliable information on this matter. The Western Fruit Grower contains the following on this subject: Prof. Tourney, of Arizona, has investigat ed crown gall, and says the disease is caused by a microscopic organism which is more apt to enter the tissues of the plant ;it the cut surface where the graft was made. But Prof. Gasman, of Kentucky experiment station, conducted some experiments, and found that the disease is very contagious and can be communicated to seedling trees by crushing the galls and placing them in ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

hero is much more wide-spread evidence to how that knots are the result of mechanical nmry and that contagion did not exist. ilie disease may often be prevented if more are is given to the growing of trees, dating mn the seed bed, and so on in transplant ,o young seedling, hoeing and cultivating ie same. The constitution of our fruit-tree seedling ock has become weakened through gene it ions of abuse, so that it is rendered more able to disease. Another probable cause of knots is the udden checking of sap during a cold snap the spring, following a period of warm eather. Nurserymen must have often ob rved that a block of peach or other seed n cjs which had been frosted would invaria v develop knots. And these knots would most likely to start at the point where „,1-v had been done from any of the inses suggested above. Investigation that means much to West iii fruit growers has recently been made by he department of botany at the university ,f Nebraska. These investigations show ,liat...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

10 LIVE STOCK AT THE FAIR. F. D. Coburn, chief of the live stock department of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, and his force of assistants are busily engaged in per fecting plans for the live stock show. A wooded tract of thirty-seven acres of ground adjoining the agriculture exhibit has been allotted to this de partment, and it will be at once im proved. A great horse show will be one of the features arranged under the direction of Robert A. Aull. KILLING OFF THE GOPHERS. The North Dakota experiment sta tion report last issued says: Fre quent inquiries are received at the experiment station asking how best to employ strychnine for poisoning gopher*. The amount of damage to farm crops by these little pests is very great. It is estimated that in 1901 the damage to the alfalfa growers of Kansas from the ravages of the pocket gopher was $500,000. Grass, small grains, corn, vegetables, etc., suffer largely from gophers. Their damage is of two-fold character, in that they not only des...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

overcome, for the poultry business i the future must be kept a moving these same people who at the , nt and in the future manifest a king for poultry culture. Even ough it be in cramped quarters at ,» beginning, with success they will in the future where the small be nn er of the past is today—away up wards the top. And while 1 know people who use prepared foods to vantage, others get along better thout them. And, of course, loca n, etc., enters largely into this con , ion. The respective crops of any ality, price, etc., should settle in one's mind what may be the cheap feeds in their locality, and as for I . necessity of free range, I say again , :t it is not necessary. Of course, you have it, make use of it, but if I have not, don't borrow any trou- I about free range, but give your ; vis clean, warm quarters in winter, a shady and comfortable as possible, in the heat of summer, ordinary feed and water in plenty, and you can rest assured that you will have the same degree of succe...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

12 THE FARMERS' INSTITUTE. The agriculturists of the state petitioned the state legislature at its recent session, for an appropriation of $5,000 to be expend ed under the direction of the State Agricul tural College and School of Sciences, in de fraying the expenses incident to the holding of farmers' institutes in each and every county of the sta.te —for a period of two v oars—s2,soo annually. The legislature granted the full amount petitioned for. The governor signed the bill. Hence, we now, for the first time, have received an appropri ation from the state for the purposes men tioned. Heretofore the college and our pro gressive and wide-awake farmers have borne the entire expenses connected with the var ious gatherings of agriculturists, and the state has received a great benefit therefrom, and it was high time that this appropriation be made, so that every tax-payer in the state, as well as every farmer should bear his just proportion of these expenses. All then, now have a dir...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

SUGAR BEET EXPERIMENTS. Recent experiments conducted at ,c Union experiment station are tak , by the officials to demonstrate that he richest sugar portion of sugar ets is about tne zone, half way tween center and circumference. ,vs a Union, Or., correspondent. An vsis of the consecutive concentric ngs is claimed to show that the ter portions contain the least sugar, , sixth, or outside ring, being in ,lity four or five rings on account the impossibility of accurate dif entiation between these last rows. The important deduction made by experiment station from this dis- very is that if the rings differ in amount of sugar they contain, re must be a corresponding dif ence in the seed produced. Thus, en the central crown is allowed to i .duce seed, a combination of the tnree or four rings nearest the een- I , is obtained, but when the central own is injured by boring and by >, icceeding fungus until there is noth ing left but the skin of the beet, seed is being grown from the poorest...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

M SUDENDORF IN CHARGE. Announcement is made of the ap pointment of E. Sudendorf, of Elgin, 111., as superintendent of the dairy branch of the department of agricul ture at the Louisiana Purchase Ex position at St. Louis. The appoint ment goes into effect at once. Mr. Sudendorf is secretary of the National Creamery Buttermakers' association, and for several years has been special agent for the department of agri culture in charge of the extensive butter tests. Mr. Sudendorf is a high authority on all questions pertaining to the dairy, and his appointment will be received with gratification by dai rymen everywhere. WORK TO GO ON. The agricultural department of the University of California has discov ered that the bill for a plant patholo gist to be attached to the college failed of passage in the legislature. Prof. Ralph E. Smith, of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, was appointed to fill the place and arrived from the east prepared for work, and was amazed when informed of the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

Ship ds your Kilt and Wool, Pelts, Furs and Tallo* ICO. SEATTLE. Send your HIUES FURS. WOOL md PELTS to F . NORTON * CO.. SEATTLE i pullers and Tanners, Hlghese Casi Pnsei i ,'J t R»tnrn». A—nt»fnr7.»nnl».iinHh "P /. BIGLOW & CO. OMMISSION MERCHANTS Successors to M. C. Nason & Co. it consignments of Fruit and ,luce. 801, 803 and 805 Western nue, Seattle, Wash. J. M. HIXSON & CO., Inc. Commission : Merchants „«ls handled strictly on commission. We do ,uy anything. Consignments solicited. Re ■ made promptly. 82 P.ZS Wootorn Avonui SEATTLE ALFOUR, GUTHRIE ft CO., 201-2-8 Bailey Building, Seattle C RAIN DEALERS Shipping, Commission importers of orebags, hop cloths, grain bags twine, etc Balfour Uuthrie <ft Co., ban Francis co, Portland, Tacoma, ___^ YOUNG I Registered I GUERNSEY | CATTLE 1 FOR SALE Three young cows, two with calves dropped in March ; four heifers, two now springing, and three bulls, one two years old in July; two will be year old in May. They are fine and...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1903

16 01 IT PAYS TO BUYTHE EASY-RUNNING EMPIRE. WHY? f|X%|9^ > Owing to its light running, it saves muscle. to start the bowl, instead of having to start it in some very WJ«^ Owing to its light bowl with few parts, it saves time and . awkward position, where it is hard for one to exert any S^¥*Mj\ labor, in cleaning. strength. Then, too, when the handle is released all the jfkwlflk* Owing to its skimming device, it saves butterfat. gearing stops running and avoids wear and accidents. fi®ilS\^ Owing to its simplicity, with nothing to get out of order, A few records from the Oregon Experiment Station iffi'BiH jt saves annoyance and trouble. •..___ ; TT , a KTMMTNP ttat tttttcj feS^\SJgsfl| Owing to its construction of the best material obtainable, lib 1MM1Nl; yuALI 1 IKS. II i BPKf I '< saves expense in repairs. . \ . ■ Jan- 20, '03 ; .02 . Feb. 1, '03 02 HIHlB! V If any man ' woman or child will examine an Empire Jan - 23 ' '03 02 Feb. 3 > -03 -01 1I! ■HK--J--. machine or study...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

11 £■" i ■ '^^ r-^ i'.^^=^V=r^^-^^*%-^£^iV=-^i^-"^f- :^^:-rr'^^- -^ i r p _ig^^i_^E.. r ' _ __-—^^^^^^a^^^^^___||_^lwa^^^^^^4." f ■ « !Ei=EE^_______iii_iiiiißi^^|^____ i I • -i- ... t ~^^E-^^^rai^'^''^^^^r^^^^^^^^P^^^^^^^^^T^_g-'^?'r^"z^:sJ|^__^ ' ~"" ' _^^^^Bl^^^^3 _£^^^^^^^ —— ■' ■tj^A " __^_______________| ■'■'■ ■"-='■•?*•-^ J^B IE ' ______H____^^Hi _■ ..... -_^^^»,~^=^ ==^ai"~'"~j• n^^^ —. j~~"~-^^^M-__r _________E3_____f '— ' --^^^^^m ~"^________^^^^-Bb4*^b_ss----^^^B Vol. XX -Mo. 10 Power Spraying Outfit. In use on F. Walden's Fruit Farm, Yakima County, Wash. See Page 8. PEARL MILLET. Washington, D. C, May 7, 1903. Editor The Ranch: Permit me to call the attention of your readers to a farmers' bulletin just issued by the Department of Agriculture on "Pearl Millet." This bulletin was prepared in the office of the agrostologist, and gives the results of experiments with this crop during the past few years. The special reason for its prepara tion at the present time lies in the f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

a GOOD BOOKS FOR FARMERS We have carefully compiled the follow lug list of books of best agricultural books, for the benefit of farmers who want de tailed information on any given subject: Hvery book is by a leading authority, and the best of its kind published. These books are sent, postpaid on receipt of price. Ad dress orders to The Ranch, Seattle. CATTLE AND DAIRYING. The Dairyman's Manual. By Henry Stew art. $1.50. Dadd's American Cattle Doctor. By George H. Dadd, M. D. $1.00. Dadd's American Cattle Doctor. By George H. Dadd, V. S. $2.00. Milk : Its Nature and Composition. By C. M. Aikman, M. A., D. Sc. $1.25. Cattle Breeding. By Wm. Warfield. $2.00. Common Sense Ideas for Dairymen. By George H. Blake. $1.00. Cheese Making—Cheddar. Swiss, Brick, Lim burger, Edam, Cottage. By John W. Decker. $1.75. Pasteurization and Milk Preservation. By J. H. Monrad. 50 cents. Diseases of Horses and Cattle. By Dr. D. Mclntosh, V. S. $1.75. Milk and Its Products. By Henry H. Wing. $1.00. Cheese...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

r ne ranch Wlth which Is consolidated The Washington Fanner, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the State Live Stock Breeders' Associ ation. MILLEK FREEMAN. - Editor and Manager. Editorial Ottices: - - - Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1266—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - Metropolitan Bldg., Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander 4 Co., 62J First Aye Subscription (In advance) f 1.00 per year. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscrip tions. Uood commission and salaries paid. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an or tier to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or posta card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Keturnlug the paper will not answer, as we cannot U-ad It on our list from the name alone on the pa per. We must have both name and address, and ail arrear...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

4 WANTED—A SCHOOL OF INSTRUC TION IN THE SCIENCE OF CON DENSED MILK MANUFAC TURE. The Ranch believes that in view of the rapid development of the condensed milk business the time is ripe for some one of our Western agricultural colleges to create a division for instruction in the science of manufacture of condensed milk, evaporated cream, etc. At present the knowledge of these proc esses is in the hands of a few private con cerns, who are making fortunes from the dairymen's product. They surround their establishments with barriers and exert every effort to suppress the special knowledge re lating to the preparation of canned milk. This is not the day when such special in formation can be retained in the hands of a select few for their individual gain. The process of condensed milk manufacture is an art requiring skilled people, but it is not so intricate that the average individual with ordinary receptive faculties cannot master it. The Ranch submits that it would be en tirely withi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

HOLSTEIN FRILSIAN CATTLE SALES. Editor The Ranch: Enclosed find ■ t of sale of Holstein cattle from ,Ue Side stock farm since Jan. 30, 03: Sold to N. N. Baxter, Sultan, Wash., II Chunkey De Kol, No. 31608, H. H. B. This was an extra fine yearl -0 Grant Poster, Catlan, Wash., bull Kol Crook, No. 31518. He was a mdson of imported Vreda and a - calf. ,lr. Chas. Brooks, of Independence, i .. got the fine young cow, Wayne i pe. No. 52164. This cow is a daugh , of Milky Wayne 4. He also got i young bull Independence De Kol, I 31566. tobert Fredlund, of Mt. Vernon, \ v ish., got the young bull Johnny Mo i No. 31607. This call's mother h been giving 55 pounds of milk per ,! on grass. Her udder measured four feet one inch around when fresh. To A. Case, of Haines, Ore., the 10 --ni. nth old bull, Decoration Sir Hen g, veld, No. 31810 H. F. H. B. This calf was extra wide in the back and low on legs. He will make a show bull. \i. B. Boyd, of Roxwell, got the yearl ing bull, Lund Carl De Kol, No...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

6_ Hand Separator to Stay. The hand separator has come to stay. It is popular in dairy sections, especially those thinly settled. The sooner the creamery operator realizes this the better. Instead of opposing the introduction of this ma chine, he should devote his energies to teaching his patrons how to produce a>nd care for their cream so that it will arrive at the creamery in the best possible con dition. True, it may be a little more diffi cult to turn out as high a grade butter from hand separator cream, but many creameries make extras from it, and buttermakers are at fault if all cannot. It is just as easy to teach patrons to care for their cream prop erly as it is to ca-re for their milk, so that it will arrive pure and sweet. If there is neg lect in cither case, prime butter cannot be secured. The proper care of the separator complicates the problem somewhat, but a live, intelligent buttermaker at the creamery will soon set his patrons right in this mat ter, so that it is ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES OF ENTIAT VALLEY. One of the most important, though least advertised, portions of Chelan county is the Entiat valley, says the Chelan Leader, so named from the stream which takes its rise far back in the Cascades in the great glaciers from which also flow two other good sized streams, the Agnes and Railroad creeks. The valley itself is about 50 or 60 miles long, extending south east and northwest, opening into the Columbia from the west about 20 miles north of Wenatchee. It is narrow but wonderfully fertile, and is settled up on both banks of the river for at least 25 miles. Resources. The resources of the valley are fruit, vegetables, cereals, stock rais ing, lumber, mining, etc. Many car loads of fruit are shipped out to Seat tle and other points every year, and the area of orchard culture is being extended each year with surprising rapidity. As giving some idea of the productiveness of fruits, the writer was informed by Mr. Henry Saunders that he obtained 5...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1903

8 Horticultural Notes By F. Walden I have read the new horticultural law and am frank to say that I do not like it. I was asked the other day why I had not written something about this law for the pages of The Ranch, and my answer was that 1 was somewhat in the condition of an OX driver of whom I heard in my boyhood days. When his oxen got ugly and would not pull to suit him, he was in the habit of ''swearing like the army in Flanders," ap plying the ox goad freely in the meantime.' The result was magical and the oxen would pull out the load. On one occasion he didn't swear at all, and when he was asked why lie did not "cuss," his reply was that he felt like it, but the oxen were so bad that he could not do the subject justice. I wish it was in my power to praise this new law, for that would be more pleasant than to find fault. * * * The worst objection to this law is that it puts too much in the hands of the state hor ticultural commissioner. If some commis sioner does not abuse th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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