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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

February, 1984 s\oun£a?% j- f\y * • Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life "A REMARKABLE GIFT" From a childhood of Appalachian poverty, Willard Gayheart has drawn from his memories to capture the very things that have given mountain people the strength to endure any adversity. His pencil drawings reflect not only the likeness of his subjects but the fabric of the mountain spirit as well. There is a detail to each of his drawings that upon first glance, one would attribute only to photography. However, closer inspection reveals an essence that camera and film cannot reproduce. His drawing of Phipps Bourne, the Mabry Mill blacksmith known to thousands as "Festus", creates an atmosphere for the beholder where the ring of the harnner on the anvil and the smell of smoke from the forge are as vivid and real as "Festus" himself. Willard was born June 5, 1932 in the rough and tumble area outside Hazard, Kentucky, in the isolated community of Cordia. there, on Lotts Creek, a love of mountain peopl...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 2 CONTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 WILLARD GAYHEART Continued from page 1. by him. All the songs written by Willard reflect his experiences and love for the mountain way of life. After graduating from high school at the age of 16, among a graduating class of ten, he began his freshman year at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky. He was only 17, backwards and scared of the environment of college life. Fresh out of a mountain hollow, it seemed to him that his mountain roots were a handicap here in the sofisticated college atmosphere. One class, English Composition, still remains among the most valuable of his college experiences. His teacher, a Miss Faulkner, encouraged him to be himself, but in spit-e of her encouragement, he attempted to hide his mountain roots and each composition or theme was writen about city experiences of which he knew nothing about. Miss Faulkner, sensing his shyness regarding his roots encouraged him continually, saying, "You've got tp be yourself." Needless t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Driving north from Meadows of Dan, Virginia, on the Blue Ridge Parkway, past the turn of the century water mill known as Mabry Mill, I turned left onto state road 758 and headed toward Buffalo Mountain. Old chestnut rail fences, naturally weathered buildings and rusty antique farm implements gives you the feeling of driving through an outdoor museum. To the right, majestic Buffalo Mountain stands as a silent witness and monument to the spirit of those brave, determined souls who first ventured here in search of "home". The first of them have long been gone but the legacy they left to their offspring survives the - wrath of time and storms of change of these last two hundred years. Here in the shadow of the "Buffalo", hard work and determination along with a spirit of self-reliance are still a part of everyday life. Like the majestic Buffalo, old fashion values have withstood the test of time here, without noticable change. Turning to the right, with the Buffalo behind me, I travel o...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 "CAP" AYERS YESTERDAY AND TODAY One cold winter night not long ago, it was my pleasure to visit with Cap Ayers and his wife Eva. I found them all bundled up by a cozy wood heater with their poodle, Cricket. When I told Cap I wanted to talk about old times, he started rattling off tales of the past so fast I could only get snatches here and there. Following is a recap of what he told me Seventy-three years ago Cap was born in The Hollow of Virginia, now known as Ararat, Virginia. His father, Pete Ayers, married twice and had 10 children, Cap being the youngest. His father farmed the land to make a living, but his life was short lived. He died when Cap was four years old. After this, his mother sold the farm and moved the family to Meadows of Dan, Virginia. Cap attended school at Stuart School in the edge of Floyd County. His first teacher was Mattie Conner (now deceased). He told me he walked to school, sometimes walking on snowdrifts over fences...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Folkways By John Beard Way back in 1682, a guy named William Penn set up what he called a "Holy Experiment* 1 in a place called Pennsylvania. Now not being a historical scholar, I'm not real sure just how the experiment turned out - except for the fact that it brought a whole passel of folks from the Rhine Valley in Germany flocking to America. When they got here, most folks found it too rough to call then "Germans from the Rhine Valley" so they called then "Pennsylvania Dutch" for short. These Pennsylvania Dutch folks were a talented group - contributing beautiful pottery, t Paying Top Dollar For Good Used Cars And Trucks Bring It By Scenic Ford We'll Look It Over!! MC tAUnMB AMVT KTAILS Of Any wo * *° u ,ook ol ot«uN»«n ol«krySlot« o ioi«»r doflwiw a Woyr* T*<*••< f ■■Qi U * u COn * a ' « d«ol ttlaM J«iiuf oKmwf ROM MAT th#l««n. M|t ?••• »o)«y «V at Scenic ford-M«rcury Lirv Am« My Oo« SCENIC S, | HIGHWAY SOI, 781-9591, MOUNT Al lit, N.C. •s.l.r ■«. 22*1 WE CA...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page * MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 THE HALF A HUNDRED SPRINGS OF MAYRERRY Editor's Note...This accounting was written by a person who witnessed the birth of our century, whose hand once held a dipper or a curled leaf at everyone of these springs. Through eyes that watched the community dwindle away, we are shown why N&yberry once prospered. Its water is a valuable resource even today, but in days gone by, it was a necessity. We are most thankful for being granted permission to print this insight into our past. The fact that it was written many years ago only exhibits the timeless beauty of nature. Each of these springs could provide you with a cool clear drink of water at this very moment . Mayberry Creek and each of its springs still flow. The half a hundred springs of Mayberry Creek are all clear free stone waters. Several of these springs had been used before the white settlers came. The large Tyra Barnard Springs have been in use for about a hundred and fifty year...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

From Page 6. also two of the three or four earliest settlers in these parts. The Bamards, with their mills greatly helped the neighborhood econony. The Scotts, with their tannery, brickmaking and large country store also helped greatly. The Barnards started Mayberry Creek Post Office. The Scotts later held it with their store and its name was shortened to Mayberry. Many whole families have left here to settle in the western states. This started just after the Civil War and has continued until the population is about one-fifth what it was 75 years ago, by estimation. This stream of water ran two good mills for years and years, including sawmills, grain mills, threshers and crushers. These mills served the Mayberry carmunity and others who came from further away as one of these had double bolters and made the best buckwheat flour that could be made, also good wheat and rye flour. The oldest of these mills was first known as the Charles Barnard Mill, built about the middle of the 19th ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 A Tale About Bootlegging (Our story up to this point.... Last month in part one, young Ike and Clem Sutphin were trying to catch old Ben Perkins making illegal liquor. They were trying to get jobs as deputies and the sheriff told them if they could accomplish this assignment, the badges were as good as theirs. Ike and Clem found it was something easier said than done. The sheriff didn't tell them that Ben was impossible to catch. Ben Perkins had sent every sheriff and revenue officer that ever went looking for him high tailing it for home. The methods Ben used to "send them packing" had convinced then all, including the sheriff himself, they'd give up "sheriffing" rather than tackle old Ben again. Ike and Clem had to find out the hard way. As our story ended last month, old Ben had caught the boys instead. After hearing their story, old Ben decided to take a few days off just to relax and enjoy himself. Here's what happened The sheriff almost ha...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Continued from previous page. Ben this morning without using the broom handle. Then he headed straight for the back room where he changed pants. When he came back out into the main room, Ben said, "I heard you screaming. Matildee' s got a mean streak when she 1 s riled. She done me that way once years ago and I still don't like coffee. She's a good woman, but I can tell you, Sheriff, she's a little bit headstrong." While Ben was taking to life as a jailbird like he'd been born with feathers , the Sheriff spent the morning in agony. By mid-afternoon, however, he was thinking mad! Who did she think she was, coming in Clyde's acting like that and treating him that way? Didn't she realize he was the Sheriff and a hero besides. He'd show her. He'd keep Ben Perkins locked up so long there wouldn't be a Paris, France when he got out! After feeding Ben his supper, he headed heme about seven o'clock. First thing he noticed when he pulled in his driveway was that his barn was gone, so was his...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 I AINT ONE TO DO MUCH TALKING Stanley Lawrence owned and operated a country store for nearly thirty years in the rural comnunity in Floyd County known as Terry's Fork, Virginia. Back in the 1930's there was no electricity, dirt roads were prevelant throughout for miles and miles and homes were built with bare necessities. With the 40's came electricity and television soon followed. The following story gives a pretty good picture of how times were in those days. Stanley Lawrence's wife, Audrey, remembers and wrote this article about.. "I AIN'T ONE TO DO MUCH TALKING" "Well I'll be earn sarn it, if there ain't the old man hisself. Well Bill, earn sarn it, it's good to see you. Well Bill, so it is old Bill. Well, well, well, I jest blowed in from Kansas myself. I was jest a standing here looking 'round at all the old familiar sights, but you know the place has changed somehow. I ain't been gone so long, but things have changed. Lot'sa changes. The...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

GRANDPA'S STORE BY DON HOWLETT Grandpa Hewlett was born and grew up in Carroll County in Virginia. He was named Norman Kelly Howlett (this is for the old-timers who might remember). Among other things, he was a staunch Republican and Carroll Countian. To me, his grandson (one of many) he was a wonderful, lovable and loving old gentleman. In his lifetime he owned several country stores, usually one or two room, and usually tilting into a creek. He also at one time was a blacksmith at Mabry Mill (Robert Wood painted it and called it "The Old Mill"). Mabry Mill is still in operation on the Blue Ridge Parkway, Meadows of Dan, Virginia. I've always loved the sound of Meadows of Dan," don't you? Anyway, there were wonderful times spent at Grandpa's store, Which had, of course, cracker barrels, * bushels of apples, pickles and a large wheel of rat cheese, canned sardines, tomatoes, chewing tobacco, snuff, tubs of lard, potatoes, onions, a pot bellied stove, cuspidor, and all those wonderfu...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 The Mail Box This month The Mountain Laurel received a package. It was a book, The National Geographic Society's "Giants From The Past", sent to us by Elizabeth Spangler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.P. Spangler of Gainsville, Florida. The instructions inside were for us to take the book to the Meadows of Dan Elementary School library. Elizabeth and her school class are featured in the book on pages 92-97, going on a "dig". Both sets of her grandparents, Hon. and Mrs. Charles L. Spangler and Mr. and Mrs. Alex Anderson were from Meadows of Dan. Thank you for the book, Elizabeth. I'm sure the children at Meadows of Dan will enjoy it. I think it was a wonderful idea to donate the book to the library. The book was dedicated in Elizabeth's own handwriting on the inside cover to the memory of her grandparents. It's nice to know that people remember and keep in touch with their roots in the Heart of the Blue Ridge. More about the man who fell out of his...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

BLUE RIDGE BUYERS DELIGHT Now vie have some of the best buys we have ever seen. If you are seriously looking for land, farms or hones, we have wonderful opportunities that you should seriously consider. Many of these properties won't be around very long. All of this in the beautiful "HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE" where we have excellent views, clean air and water and the best of people. Call or write to us and let us know what you are looking for. Be specific about what you need. We will do our best to find it without being pushy. You decide what will make you happy. Do you want land with river frontage? We have it. Hew about your own mountain complete with spring water, view and southern exposure? How about pasture land or even a motel? We have beautiful homes-some simple, some fancy. Whatever your price range is, we can help. Do you need owner financing? Many properties can be acquired this way. Here is a small sanpling of properties that are a buyers' delight. We have much more. Come ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 Many a February hour has been spent through the years in the creative and most pratical art of quilting. Quilting originated in the Orient hundreds (maybe thousands) of years ago as a method of making padded warm clothing. Hie bed covers our European forefathers knew were very different from the patchwork quilt we know today. Then, a bed coverlet was made from two full size pieces of material and stuffed with a warm filling such as goose down. When our pioneer forefathers here in America began running short of supplies such as whole bolts of cloth, the American ingenuity came in. A piece of material probably started housekeeping on the bed as a sheet. When if became worn in places it was then cut and sewn into pillowcases; then dish towels. Worn out clothing was never thrown out but cut apart and the pieces still good were saved. Along the way, some smart seamstress got the idea that even the smallest scraps could be sewn together for a warm be...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

CALEB & HENRY Caleb was just coming out of the drug store on main street when who should he run into but his old friend, Henry. "Oh no," Caleb thought, "He's seen me for sure. I knowed I should have got an earlier start." "Going somewhere?", Henry said. Caleb jumped like someone had shot him and started stammering,"Me? No, nowhere in particular, just thought I'd get out of the house a while." Henry sniffed, "You sure do smell good for a man who's just going for a ride." Henry walked a small circle around Caleb and replied, "You're awful spruced up too. Sure you're not going any place in particular?" "Now what would make you say that?" "What you got in that sack there?", said Henry, pointing to a big white bag Caleb was holding. Caleb pulled the sack behind his back as Henry reached out towards it. "Tain't none of your business , Henry. None of your business at all!" Henry wasn't^going to let this slide. This was the best opportunity to rib Caleb that he had had in years....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 A MISGUIDED CUPID It was the mid-1970' s when my cornmedian friend T. Eugene (Gene) Nicholson from Greensboro, N.C. paid me a visit. He was on his way to an engagement in Bristol, Tennessee when he stopped by and went with me as I ran an errand to Stuart, Virginia. His plans were to drive from Meadows of Dan to Bristol that afternoon and provide after dinner humor for a group of businessmen meeting in that city. ' As we were heading back to Meadows of Dan, I stopped at a flower shop in Stuart and bought my wife, Charlotte, a dozen roses. When I got back in the car, Gene was full of questions, "why'd you buy the flowers? Is it Charlotte's birthday?" "No", I replied, "I just like to give her flowers occasionally to say I love you. She loves to get then and I enjoy surprising her occasionally because she appreciates them so much. Don' t you ever surprise Blanche with flowers?", I asked Gene about his wife. "We've been married 19 years", he answere...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

BLUE RIDGE BOOKSHELF BY: PARKS LANIER, JR. One of last year's most surprising, and most wonderful Appalachain publications appeared in Montana. STEP AROUND THE MOUNTAIN (Seven Buffaloes Press, Box 249, Big Timber, Montana 29011. 75 pages, $4-35 postpaid) contains the work of fourty-three regional writers, fiction and poetry. Taking its title from a quilt pattern, the book has all the charm, warmth, and durability of a homemade quilt. The credits page reads like a who's who of Appalachian writers, including a lot of younguns just getting their start. Everything is first-rate here. Collections of this size rarely capture the full range of the Appalachain experience., but all the stances are here, reflected in the book's five sections. "Hill and Holler Portraits" has my favorite, Bettie Sellers' "Eunice Claims the Star of Bethlehem," with sisters squabling over Mama's quilts. "Fran Darkness They Came" is a section honoring coal miners. ""And He Walked With Me" is, of course, about reli...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 GROWING UP ON TOGGLES CREEK BY Y.K.W. v ' M ; 9 yyf w w Left—Y.K.W. mounted on King. Right—Loy Harris on Diamond. This photo was taken "goin* a courtin'" around 1921. King of the Road This is a story about a horse - a horse that was almost human and loved by all our family as if he were. When we first acquired "Old King" he would break and jump and come down stiff legged like a western horse with rodeo experience. However, he soon became a very smart gated saddle horse. He had only one failing, his passionate love for his "home", a stable in our barn. He did not like being tied up anywhere else and went to all length to let us know it by pawing the earth, weaving side to side and knickering constantly. I used to ride him when I went courting and he never failed to let me know it was time to go home. On a few occasions, he managed to get loose and headed home, leaving me to walk several miles to get home. But, knowing his love for heme, I always...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

VALENTINE MEMORIES BY: HAZEL HEDRICK Was Valentine's Day special to me in the John Hayes Hollow? Yes, Valentine's Day was very special. The first of February we made a Valentine Box at school, and every child made as many Valentines as he or she wanted to, 1 (or could afford). Seme kids didn't have any extra paper or crayons, but most of us managed to save up some wrapping paper and we could borrow a couple of crayons. We all made lots of pretty little hearts and made up verses and filled that box so full not one mor* would go in the slit in the top. Then on Valentine's BUY NOW, SAVE NOW! t BUY A JOHN DEERE COMPACT UTILITY TRACTOR TODAY, PAY NO FINANCE CHARGES UNTIL APRIL 1 i Now's the time to buy that compact diese! utility tractor you know you'll need in the spring. Buy a John Deere 650, 750, 850, 950 or 1050 Tractor now, and no finance charges will accrue until April 1, 1984. Put an economical, reliable diesel to work for you right now, and keep the money you save on finance char...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1984

Page 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1984 TELEPHONE READER INTERVIEWS " "SCHOOL MARMS" Each ironth we call people v*x> send us their phone number and write this colum from those chats". This vey we get to meet more people and share their wonderful stories with our readers. MS. MAE CLIFTON Ms. Mae Clifton is 84 years old. She lives in Martinsville, Virginia now but she was born and raised at Vesta, Virginia. Her brother, Fred Clifton, still lives here. She taught school at the old Meadows of Dan School (pictured in our January issue) in 1917 and 1918. At that time, the principal was Annie Maud Elkins and her co-teachers were Lorna Blackard and Dot Turner. After those first two years of teaching , she says she was always assigned to small, one room, one teacher schools. She says, "I was a big girl and they must have thought I could manage." She taught at eight schools, all over Patrick County. Those schools included Busted Rock School, Wood School and Poorhouse School. In thos...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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