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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1988

June, 1988 Salmonella scare is bad timing for egg farmers A recent report blaming salmonella for contamination of eggs couldn't have come at a worse time for Virginia egg farmers, who've been suffering from low prices for six months. The report, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in early April, said salmonella was the source of at least 65 food poisoning cases. It cited 2,119 cases of illness and 11 deaths in the Northeastern U.S. in connection with salmonella infections from January, 1985 to May, 1987. For the first time, the study raised the possibility of salmonella contamination within egg shells. Previous outbreaks had been blamed on dirty or cracked eggs. But that possibility puzzles Cecilia Glembocki, executive director of the Virginia Egg Council. "Dr. Robert Baker, at Cornell University, has done extensive work on salmonella," Ms. Glembocki said. "He has found that it's very difficult to actually grow salmonella within an egg. Farmers allowed flex...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1988

6 Questionnaire surveys needs of Policy Development This is your opportunity to develop Farm Bureau policies affecting agriculture. This member questionnaire appears as an insert in the June issue of the Virginia Farm Bureau News. It should help you assess the issues important to Farm Bureau members in your county. It is designed to be returned to your county resolutions committee. Please complete the questionnaire and return it to your county office as soon as possible. Purpose The purpose of Farm Bureau's policy development program is to provide every Farm Bureau producer Farm Bureau wants your opinion! Farm Bureau policy is your policy! To help your county Farm Bureau develop policies on issues which affect you, take a few minutes to look over many of these issues of importance to agriculture. The following questions pertain to such vital agricultural topics as agricultural research, biotechnology, import quotas, land use zoning, and many others which affect farmers in indirect w...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1988

June, 1988 Virginia Farm Bureau members Peanut, Soybean and Feed Grains, Labor, Education, Rural Health, Natural Resources, Women's and Young Farmers. County Farm Bureau Local Action County Resolutions Committees encourage the opinion of individual producer members and other county Farm Bureau committees on local, state and national issues. These Committees draft proposed resolutions on major concerns of the producer member. County Farm Bureaus then establish annual meeting dates for producer members to discuss and vote on proposed resolutions and to initiate resolutions from the floor. Calendar July 11 - July 21— District Policy Develop men* Meetings August - September—County Resolutions Committee Meetings August - October—County Annual Meetings October 19—Deadline for county resolutions reporting to state office November 2 - 3—VFBF State Resolutions Committee Meeting November 28 - December I—VFBF Annual Convention January 8 -12—AFBF Annual Convention Land Use Planning &amp...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1988

8 r 1 I Andy Allan son Farmers victims of attorneys Continued from Page 1 threatened lawsuits, particularly in the area of employment," Delano said. Such harrassment, he explained, is unnecessary because most farm employment disputes could be resolved without a lawsuit "if a simple attempt were made to get the employer and complaining employee together" first. But, the VFBF president said, "that has not been the situation in too many cases. Legal Services attorneys are literally driving farmers out of business due to legal harassment and exorbitant legal costs in defending themselves." What in the World Does a Personal Computer have to do phases of the moon and ; throwing out a few seeds in ' the spring. Today's fanner • must be an accountant, a wlia'ji legal expert, and a marketing WHD specialist as well as a soil technician and gambler. Farming in the 1990's will be more profitable for those that can shuffle their numbers better —and a personal computer can help with the record ke...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1988

June, 1988 'Outstanding Young Agriculturalist' award Young Farmer of the Year The search for the 1988 Young Farmer of the Year ended June 1. County winners will be eligible for district selection which will be completed by June 15. District winners and their spouses will receive one night's lodging and two meals at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention this fall. In addition, district winners will be awarded a telephone answering machine, courtesy of Southern States Cooperative, Inc. The state winner will be announced at the VFBF Convention during the Young Farmer Awards Program. The winners will receive a travel package and meal allowance to the American Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention and the AFBF Young Farmer and Rancher Conference. They will also receive a personal computer, courtesy of the Virginia Farm Credit Association and Farm Credit Banks of Baltimore. The state runner-up will receive a $100 Safemark gift certificate from the VFBF Service Corporati...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1988

10 FB's financial service offers comprehensive plan Continued from Page 1 And in the event of an IRS audit, Farm Bureau will represent the client. Why Farm Bureau? The VFBF specializes in agricultural accounting, not general accounting. Consultants are educated specifically for this, with detail- Ed training in agricultural economics and accounting and several years working experience. 'When a consumer sells his car, how does he know what to sell it for? He doesn't. So he goes to the newspaper for comparisons or he gets the bluebook value and finds out. There is no bluebook for cattle or soybeans.' —Peter Ward In addition, Farm Bureau maintains a working $7,000 tax library at the home office in Richmond. With the recent major tax revisions, this has become even more vital. "With the library, if there's a question, it can be looked up immediately," Ward adds. "Not all CPAs, accountants and financial planners know how to handle agricultural returns," he says. "Frankly, they just don't...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1988

June, 1988 ANIMALS BRAHMAN CATTLE, DIAMOND B FARM, REGISTERED. GENTLE, POWHATAN, VA 804-794-1209. BRAHMAN CATTLE - Reds/greys. Very gentle. Skyline Form, Mechonicsville, VA 23111. 1-804-779-2317. ARABIAN BLACK STALLION - at stud, excellent disposition. Registered Arabian/Quarter Yearlings for sale. Contact Patty Adams, Skyline Farm, Mechonicsville, VA 23111. 1-804-779-2317. COLLIE PUPPIES! AKC, breeder of "Lassie-type", champion bloodlines, 2 litters whelped April 22 and 24th. 1-804-779-2317. TBX mare, 3 years, eye catching chestnut, excellent hunter prospect. Blue Run Farm (804) 384-8998. PERCHERON GELDING - Registered 3 years old, 16.2 + hands, green broken to ride/drive. $2500 or offer. (703) 672-1152. HUNTER PROSPECTS - Various horses available. Priced from $1500. (703) 672-1152. FREE TO GOOD HOME. 5 1/2 month female blue tick/retriever cross. Solid black with few white markings. Good pet/hunter. Call 703-948-5230. NEW! FREE CATALOG-WHOLESALE PRICES. BROILERS AND PEDIGREE LAYING...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1988

If your insurance program hasn't been reviewed in the past two years, you probably don't have the coverage you think you have. Jun« r I9BB THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS Vol. 47, No. 6 ol .'• P ** '¥ - «fl Bv^^H ~ <*ffi/jSBBWI S JPk ~.'V M W~Mk 111 JiffiwHni A curious young man playr'p44k-a-boo with a pair of guernsey yearlings during a Farm Bureausponsored Agriculture in the Classroom display May 14. The Ag in the Classroom program helps young children understand the contributions of agriculture. Children were also given an explanation about groundwater by Farm Bureau's Jean Guthrie (lower photo), and received free Ag in the Classroom coloring books. It was all part of Pemberton Elementary School's Annual Spring Fling in Henrico County. More than 70,000 Virginia school children have participated in the program which began statewide in 1986. Since then, over 30,000 study textbooks and 3,000 teacher guides have been distributed primarily to fourth grade stu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

NEWS ■ ' 1 . ,-v . v .| •' ■ - ' , :U f C.k;' ,■■ . :'* ./-■ ~ , . / 1,. -<\ U, . ' y Vol. 47, No. 7 y'/ : * Wto ''"'' «■ Hlji ■ jjj |. mHAJ£ I # BLlf * IBSDI Hbvi' Freak hail storm wiped out Shorty Goodman's Hanover tomato crop. Virginia Tech's new president sees need for agricultural grads By KATHY BUTLER VFB News Editor BLACKSBURG—Virginia Tech's new president, Dr. John D. McComas, has seen young people become discouraged from studying for agricultural careers because of hardships faced by family farms in recent years. But he believes recruiting efforts will turn the situation around. 'There continues to be a need for both producers and people in broader fields of agriculture," said McComas, who will leave his presidency at the University of Toledo, Ohio in September to serve as Virginia Tech's 13th president. It is the duty of universities like Virginia Tech to prevent an acute shortage of people in the agricultural industry, he said. McComas was one of 85 applicants,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

2 Tech Vet School a credit to state, region In 1983 and '84 an avian flu epidemic threatened to wipe out Virginia's multimillion dollar poultry industry. At about the same time, the Potomac Horse Fever played havoc with our precious horse industry, an industry that brings in millions of dollars in sales alone to Virginians each year. But in both instances, efforts by the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine put an abrupt halt to both of these potentially devastating animal diseases. There have been similar cases since 1978 when the institution opened. And in nearly every instance, the "Vet School" in Blacksburg has played a leading role in curing whatever ails the Old Dominion's animal population. The college has already produced 400 well-trained veterinarians who are vital to Virginia's $800 million livestock industry New Insurance features make membership a must If you are a policy holder of the Farm Bureau insurance services program, I would like to thank you...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

July: 1988 ' Efforts continue to kill unfair tax WASHINGTON—Farm Bureau members from'across the country have been instrumental in preventing Congress from burying efforts to repeal federal excise taxes on diesel fuel. As of mid-May, 204 House members had co-signed a bill that would repeal the unpopular tax collection of off-road users, according to Grace Ellen Rice, American Farm Bureau Federation assistant director of national affairs. Many did so after Farm Bureau constituents contacted them and explained the Crop Hail insurance works Continued from Page 1 said E. Bruce Stone, crop insurance manager with the Virginia Farm Bureau. Crop Hail coverage can be purchased anytime during the growing season. Stone recalls that Farm Bureau wrote a tremendous amount of policies one year when hail hit tomatoes three weeks before harvest. Growers had taken a beating and wanted to protect what survived against future hail damage, he said. Truck farmers on the Eastern Shore can cover their tomat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

4 Apple growers urged to consider foreign markets By NORM HYDE VFB Staff Writer STAUNTON—A dozen Virginia apple growers met marketing officials of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services May 6-7 to discuss profit opportunities overseas. "We've found it to be a lucrative market," said William Freeman of Doe Creek Farm in Pembroke. "It's much more satisfactory than some of the local markets. There's more money in it, but they do demand higher quality. I think as long as we can furnish the high quality, we can keep that market." The keynote speaker of the seminar, "Marketing Virginia Apples for Export," was Shelton Saslow of the Justfrank Company of Santa Rosa, CA. He prefers dealing with overseas customers. "First of all, when I'm dealing with a buyer in Europe, I know he's not getting 10 or 15 different quotes for the same product," Saslow said. "He knows what I have, and I know what he wants, and I know I'm going to get paid for the product. "It's all part of th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

July, 1988 M' Listeners responded to Paul Harvey's show on AFBF. On airways Farm Bureau joins Harvey PARK RIDGE, ILL.—June 28, Farm Bureau began advertising on Paul Harvey's radio programs. American Farm Bureau Federation President Dean Kleckner said that the Federation will have one spot a week that will rotate among Harvey's four popular programs. "We are delighted that we are able to team up with Paul Harvey," said Kleckner. "This is a near-perfect match. 'The advantages of advertising on Paul Harvey are many. We can educate the non-farmers who tune into his show, build pride among present members, acquire new members and gain added respect among non-members," Kleckner said. According to Kleckner, Farm Bureau leadership began discussing the idea to sponsor Harvey's radio shows after Harvey spoke to the AFBF 1987 annual meeting in Anaheim. 'To those in attendance it was clear that he supported the basic beliefs of the organization," he said. A few days following the speech, Harvey...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

6 SOME ANSWERS TO YOUR CONCERNS ABOUT MEDICARE Available At Your County Farm Bureau OtTice The first $540 when you're hospitalized—paid in full ■ Your $75 calendar year deductible for medical care—paid in full ■ Medicare coinsurance amounts that you're responsible for—also covered ■ Out-of-hospital prescription drug benefits available ■ "Vbur choice of two plans ■ Medicare Extended, for good, solid protection ■ Medicare Extended Plus Major Medical, for superior benefits with many extras ■ Personalized assistance from your local Farm Bureau office ■ Blue Cross and Blue Shield statewide toll-free service especially for Farm Bureau members ■ Help with hospital and medical bills that Medicare doesn't cover ■ The convenience of automatic monthly payments with our Bankomatic service ■ Nationally recognized Subscriber Identification Card ■ Affordable monthly rates Call or visit your local County Farm Bureau Office for this free brochure and answers to arty question you may have about Blue ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

July, 1988 —Here's A Farm Bureau Service 'That Can Cut Your 1 $$ tL r-r 1 Presctiptkm Costs In Half 1 .uddfrw Now Enjoy Savings, Convenience And FREE Home Delivery \ ■ J With Feld Prescription Service For Farm Bureau Members 1 L ——■ " CONVENIENCE. You can order by mail or, for even faster SERVICE. Most prescriptions are filled within 24 hours and service, call our special toll-free number. delivered within 72 hours right to your door. SAVINGS. Through volume purchasing and generic choices, Feld Drug can cut your prescription costs by up to 50% and TO ORDER, CALL OUR TOLL-FREE NUMBER: 1-800-228-3353 QUALITY. Feld sells only top-quality prescription items SAVE UP TO 83% ON THESE from nationally known, licensed firms in compliance with the Use this toll-free number to order any item listed. If you don't U.S. Food and Drug Administration standards. see what you need — please call and ask. This is only a partial FELD GENERIC PRESCRIPTIONS SAFETY. For your protection Feld pharmacists main...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

8 Editor's note: This editorial column is published annually as the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation holds policy development hearings in all seven districts through July. Look for more issues next month. Farm Program The problem for Farm Bureau in the coming year will be to maintain the policy directions set by the 1985 Farm Bill. But the monkey wrench this year is that some commodities have significantly declined in stocks. Drought in the nation's midsection is another kink. The new challenge is to make regulatory adjustments in such a way to maintain our share of world markets, maintain farm income and moderate the government costs associated with the farm program. "We are in a developmental stage for the type of program we will have in 1990, and producer members should take a long hard look at what exists," said Alex Hamilton, VFBF Public Affairs director. For Virginians, who take pride in and try to make a living growing corn, oats, barley, soybeans, wheat, peanuts, tobacco and ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

July, 1988 jb&BW ■P*'* Checkoff has collected $126 million in the U.S. for beef promotion and research. (Photo by Va. Cattle Industry Board) Beef Checkoff wins spring vote By NORM HYDE VFB Staff Writer RlCHMOND—Virginia cattle producers voted with their counterparts across the nation May 10 to continue a dollar-a-head checkoff program that pays for beef promotion and research programs. Of 3,908 Virginia producers who voted in the referendum, 2,914 voted yes. 'That made it about a 75/25 yes vote," according to Mahlon Rudy, state director of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service, which tallied the ballots. Nationally, about 79 percent voted in favor of the program. More than 250,000 American farmers voted in the referendum, a significant increase over previous checkoff programs. In Virginia, turnout was about the same as in a 1984 referendum on a 25-cent-a-head checkoff, according to Reggie Reynolds, executive director of the Virginia Cattleman's Associat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

10 I- f l •'^K^ \ ■fcjw lli m » %-K/wfl * * Bim a Wk V vH - ~•• iM«i imi HI : . ■ Chemicals farmers have relied on, like Atrazine and Alachlor, may not be available in a few years. Pesticide symposium sends warning to farmers By NORM HYDE VFB Staff Writer RICHMOND—Soon, Virginia farmers no longer will be able to use many of the farm chemicals they've become accustomed to the past few decades. That warning came through loud and clear at a National Pesticide Symposium held here in early June. Even Ann Sorensen, pesticide and integrated pest management specialist for the American Farm Bureau Federation, acknowledged that the winds of change are blowing. "It's my guess that within the next five to 10 years, 30 to 40 percent of the chemicals that we're currently using will no longer be available to us," she said. Those will probably include Atrazine and Alachlor, which now represent about 37 percent of our herbicide market. Ms. Sorensen's warning was echoed by zoologist Sue Hazeltine of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

July, 1988 ™ * ;i pi II ; |HM| Calvin and Denise Ellington helped grill 1500 chops. (Photo by Kathy Butler) Pork celebrated at festival By KATHY BUTLER VFB News Editor EMPORIA—The 14th Annual Virginia Pork Festival June 8 was simply a day for some 14,000 people to wallow in pride for the swine industry. "We like to draw attention to hogs and the area but never discuss prices," said Bobby Flippen, Greensville County Extension Agent and one of four original festival board of directors members still serving. "The festival paid a lot more for pork this year than last year, but maybe the producer is faring better. We pay the price, whether it's up or down," he said. Flippen's only remark about dryer parts of the nation and high feed prices was "that the bonefide swine producers in this area have empathy for the Georgia, Illinois or Indiana producer whose corn has dried up." The warm, sunny day that kept festival goers pouring down the beverages and reddened many noses, was one to applaud...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1988

12 Forestry tour Easements and zoning protect area By KATHY BUTLER VFB News Editor The scenic Dragon Run, a waterway that snakes through Virginia's Middle Peninsula, may remain a healthy tributary to the Chesapeake Bay if efforts continue as they have in the past few years. Tree farmers and landowners from around and outside of Virginia learned about those efforts on the 14th Annual Spring Forestry and Wildlife Tour May 24. The event was sponsored by the Cooperative Extension Service and Virginia Tech's School of Forestry and Wildlife Resources in cooperation with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and others. Conservation easements and special zoning regulations are little to ask to protect the waterway, said Jerry Stokes, state land conservation coordinator with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. He led visitors to a swampy hardwood bottom by the Dragon near Mascot and explained how a conservation easement works for the 33-acre tract. A conservation easement is a legal tool in which ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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