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Elephind.com contains 891,773 items from Columbia Missourian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Oil Trust is Free [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

OIL TRUST IS FREE Government Abandons Its Fight in $29,000,000 Fine Case. By United Press CHICAGO March 10. The government abandoned its case against the Standard Oil company today, after the court had dismissed all courts referring to the shipments of oil. When the government gave up the prosecution, the defense moved for a verdict of acquittal. The jury, after instructions from the court, returned the verdict of “not guilty.” Probably all pending indictments against the oil company will be quashed. The trial was the second one in the $20,000,000 case.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
The Missouri Oil Case Appealed [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

The Missouri Oil Case Appealed. By United Press. JEFFERSON CITY, March 10. Hagerman acting for the Standard Oil company filed a motion today for an appeal to the Unites State Supreme Court from the judgment ouster rendered by the Missouri supreme court. The bond of $100,000 was furnished.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
The Funeral of S. H. Elkins [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

THE FUNERAL OF S. H. ELKINS Services Were Held at the Home This Afternoon. Funeral services for Samuel H. Elkins postmaster at Columbia, who died yesterday, were held at the home at 315 Christian College avenue at 2:15 o’clock this afternoon. The Rev. M. A. Hart of the Christian church conducted the services. A large number of friends attended. The active pallbearers were: R. F. Rogers, L. D. Smith, Dr. D. F. Luckey, Claude Wheeler, F. L. Johnson, L. T. Searey. The honorary pallbearers were: F. W. Smith, Robert Hall, Dr. M. D. Lewis, Dr. R. B. Tilley, Humphrey Walker, T. W. Whittle. The Elks’ lodge had charge of the services at the cemetery. About sixty members of the lodge were present. Resolutions in memory of Mr. Elkins were adopted by the Elks’ lodge today. The Columbia post office was closed during the services this afternoon. A daughter of Mr. Elkins, Mrs. Cleveland Hilson, of Electric, Mont., is expected to arrive Friday morning. E. W. Stephens will deliver an address on “Rel...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Columbia Growing in What Direction? [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

COLUMBIA GROWING IN WHAT DIRECTION? Question to Be Considered in Locating New High School Building. BUSINESS MEN DIFFER Some Favor Retaining Old Site While Others Would Seek a New One. The citizens of Columbia are nearly equally divided on the subject retaining or discarding the present high school site for a new building, if the opinions of a dozen or more representative business men can be taken as a criterion. Is the town building north or south? That question which must be considered in locating a school was answered differently. About half of the men visited said that the growth of Columbia would be toward the south, southeast and southwest. The others believe that the center of the residence district is moving towards the north and northwest. R. B. Price, cashier of the Boone County National bank, believes that the town is grown south, southeast and southwest. The center of population, he says, may even now be as far south as Broadway. “I have nothing to say about the location...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
High School Day Circulars [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

HIGH SCHOOL DAY CIRCULARS Information Regarding the Event is Being Sent Out Today. Circulars containing information about High School day to be held at the University of Missouri Saturday May 1, were mailed today to all of the accredited high schools of the state. The sixth annual track field meet will be held in the afternoon. The preliminary events will be held in the morning. No decision has been made regarding a baseball game between the championship teams of the St. Louis and Kansas City high schools. Such a game was held last year. It has not been definitely decided to have a basketball game between two championship teams of the state Friday night before high school day. Low rates given and excursion trains are run each year to accommodate the students of the high schools of Missouri who desire to visit the University of Missouri. The entertainments for high school day are planned by this committee: Chairman, Dr. Clark W. Hetherington; Dr. Isidor Loeb, Dr. J. L. Meriam and Dr....

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Prizes for Best Side Shows [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

PRIZES FOR BEST SIDE SHOWS The Farmers Desire Something Original at Annual Fair. In preparation for the Farmers’ annual county fair prizes of $5, $3 and $2 for the three best side shows have been offered. They must be the work of students in the agricultural department, and are to be judged according to their ingenuity, originality, the amount of work done on them, and their popularity.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
For the Council of Women [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

For the Council of Women. The sophomore class has elected its representatives in the Council of Women of the University of Missouri: Miss Mary Leech, Miss Ruth Eversole and Miss Alice Richardson.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Heat in Orchards to Save the Fruit [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

HEAT IN ORCHARDS TO SAVE THE FRUIT Dr. Howard Experiments With a Device for Burning Oil. IS AN ENEMY TO FROSTS Temperature Among Trees Raised Six Degrees by New Method. The almost perennial destruction of the fruit crop in Missouri by the late spring frosts have led to a series of experiments by the Department of Horticulture of the University of Missouri. The latest and what promises to be the best is a method of heating the orchard to keep the buds and young fruit above the freezing point. The heating experiment was started last year. Fully half of the fruit on the state farm was saved according to a statement made by Dr. W. L. Howard, who is doing the work. Pans similar to the old-fashioned cake pan with a pipe through the center is partly filled with petroleum. The pipe running up through the center is designed to produce a draft and give the blaze enough air to burn well. A quart of oil is placed in each one of the pans. To insure protection to the fruit 100 pans are used to an...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Priest is Murdered [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

PRIEST IS MURDERED Curate and His Housekeeper Shot Down in Newark N. J.-Assassins Escape. By United Press. NEWARK. N. J., March 10. The Rev. Erasmus Anson, the curate of a Polish Catholic church here, was assassinated in the parish rectory this morning by three men. His housekeeper, Miss Lonista, was also shot. The priest died on the way to a hospital. Miss Lonista is thought to be fatally wounded. The cause of the shooting is unknown. The assassins escaped.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
He'll Tell What M. U. Needs [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

HE’LL TELL WHAT M. U. NEEDS Dr. A. Ross Hill to Meet Committee on Appropriations Tomorrow. Dr. A. Ross Hill, president of the University of Missouri, is in St. Louis to attend the dinner to President Woodrow Wilson of Princeton University given at the University club by the Virginia society. Dr. Hill will go to Jefferson City tomorrow to present the house committee on appropriations the needs of the University for the biennial period.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Dickinson Still a Democrat [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

DICKINSON STILL A DEMOCRAT Taft’s Secretary of War Says He Has Not Renounced His Principles. By United Press. CHICAGO, March 10. Jacob M. Dickinson, who is soon to be Secretary of War in President Taft’s cabinet, said today that he is still a Democrat. Mr. Dickinson said that he worked against Taft in the last election and had not renounced his principles.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
K. U. Claim is Not Allowed [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

K. U. Claim is Not Allowed. WASHINGTON, March 10. The present session of Congress will not settle the claim for $20,000 made by the University of Kansas against the government for the destruction of the Free State hotel in Lawrence, Kan. The House leaders have killed the appropriation authorized by a provision of the omnibus claim bill.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Came 20,000 Miles to Attend University [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

CAME 20,000 MILES TO ATTEND UNIVERSITY Val Nalty. Came 20,000 Miles to M. U. Val Nalty, Australian, Makes Long Trip for an Education. Traveling 700 miles to the coast of Australia, by donkey and camel team from the middle of the Australian desert, and working his way 20,000 miles over land and sea, are some of the experiences of Val Nalty, an Australian, in reaching the University of Missouri. Val Nalty enrolled at the beginning of the last semester. Eighteen months ago, Nalty was engaged in the photographic and gold speculating business in the desert gold fields of Australia. It had always been his ambition to get a college education. An education, similar to a free university education, in Australia would cost nearly $15,000, thus putting a college education above the heads of a majority of the people. It was from a brother of E. B. Miller, a student in the Engineering Department, that Nalty learned of the advantages offered by the American system of education, and especially by t...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
To Inspect National Guard [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

TO INSPECT NATIONAL GUARD Captain Frazier Requests that Student Members Report to Him. Adjutant-General Rumbold of the Missouri National Guard has requested Captain Frazier to furnish him the names of all students in the University of Missouri who belong to the Missouri National Guard. To enable him to comply with General Rumbold’s request Captain Frazier said today he would like to see all students who belong to the National Guard at his office in the west end of the basement of Academic hall between 3 and 4:30 o’clock next Friday afternoon. Captain Frazier said this was the first time that student members of the National Guard, who are not members of the cadet corps, had been ordered to report. He thinks the purpose of the order is to provide for their inspection by Major W. H. Johnston, U. S. A., who has been detailed by the War Department at Washington to inspect the Missouri National Guard.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Prof Pommer Will Lecture [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

PROF. POMMER WILL LECTURE First of Series on Classical Music at Assembly Tomorrow. Prof. W. H. Pommer, of the Department of Music of the University of Missouri, will give a course of three lectures on the question, “What Is Classical Music?” at the assemblies tomorrow, March 16 and March 18. The lectures will be illustrated by the works of the great masters. Prof. Pommer will attempt to show the principles underlying the highest form of musical art.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
All Seniors Planning 'Stunt' [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

All-Seniors Planning “Stunt.” The all-senior class of the University of Missouri is making preparations for the class day “stunt” and senior play to be given this spring. A meeting was held last night and several committees reported.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Wisconsin to Start Journalism School [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

WISCONSIN TO START JOURNALISM SCHOOL The Course is Patterned After the One Established Here. WISSOURIAN ITS MODEL A Daily Paper Will be Issued as Laboratory Work-Put in Effect Next Fall. The University of Wisconsin, which President Eliot of Harvard pronounces the leading state university of America, and which certainly is entitled to be considered in the front rank of state universities, has followed the leadership of the University of Missouri by establishing a four years’ course in journalism. The course is patterned after that established in the University of Missouri the present school year and will be put in effect at the University of Wisconsin next fall. Official announcement has been made of the establishment of the course by the Wisconsin University in close imitation of the plan pursued at Missouri. The University of Wisconsin will have its daily paper, the Madison, Wis., Cardinal, as the laboratory in which instruction and training in preparation for journalism will be gi...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
And Harvard Too? [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

AND HARVARD TOO? The School is Lagging Behind In Journalism, Says Magazine. The Harvard Magazine publishes a six-page article by its editor, Hans Von Kaltenborn, of the class of ’09, on “Harvard’s Sin of Omission.” In it the magazine outlines a plan of establishing a school of journalism at Harvard University. History is given of the growth of the movement for schools of journalism at Kansas, Wisconsin, Indiana, Virginia, Nebraska, Washington, Yale, Paris and Heidelberg. Special attention is given to the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri, of which a page of complimentary mention is made. “The special training,” says the magazine, “is bound to expand. Here is a great movement in which Harvard is lagging behind. What can be done to place her in the lead?” Following the magazine’s first argument for a school of journalism at Harvard there is published in the March issue an article on “The Harvard Daily Truth,” a vision, in which a daily newspaper is described as the la...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Freshman Takes Political Job [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

FRESHMAN TAKES POLITICAL JOB In a Few Days C. W. Mullenix Will Become a County Treasurer Charles W. Mullenix, of Unionville, Mo., the student who was elected treasurer of Putnam county, Mo., will leave in a few days to take charge of his office. Mullenix is a freshman in the college of Arts and Science. All of his campaigning was done in two weeks last fall before election when he was excused from the university for that purpose. The term of office is for four years. After that time Mullenix said he would return to the university, probably, and take the law course.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
But It's Pennies That Count [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

But It’s the Pennies that Count Parking Meters Are Big Business If you’ve ever had a piggy bank you know how long it takes pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters to add up-especially when you save for something special. But Columbia’s parking meters, unlike your piggy bank, have thousands of hands putting coins in. The money adds up so fast it keeps two men hopping to keep up with it. Patrolman Jesse Hughes, in charge, and Lewis Ashlock, meter repairman, work as a team to empty and keep the city’s 1,631 meters operating effectively. The daily “take”-the coins from one-third to one-fourth of the meters-weighs over 400 pounds. In 1967 the city’s gross receipts from the meters were $113,148.99-a significant slice of the annual revenue. Emptying the meters is only a small part of Hughes’ and Ashlock’s job. They also count, sack and deposit the money in the bank, make 30 to 40 service calls a day and overhaul meter mechanisms. Emptying the meters is only a small part of Hughes’ and Ashlock...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
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