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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

PACIFIC RURAL PRESS Number 4.] SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JAN. 28, 1871. [Volume I.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A CHEAP COUNTRY HOUSE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

A CHEAP COUNTRY HOUSE. Ww present our readers to-day with the plans of a neat country house, adapted for a dwelling of rather moderate cost, and well suited for a village or suburban residence, or even for a farm house, although it lacks a wood-house, which, however, can easily be added. In the interior, too little attention has been given to architecture. Our farmers' houses are too often very homely, ungainly structures, not at all inviting to the eye. Now we believe in making one's home as attractive as possible, without going to great expense. Tliat one can have a pretty residence, which he can well be proud of, and still without necessarily expending large sums of money, is shown by the present illustration. We propose giving a number of such designs from time to time. It is very important to secure, in connection with a dwelling house, plenty of verandah room and large and airy apartments capable of easy and complete ventilation. These appendages, besides being ornamental and ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Progress. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Mechanical Progress. Boring Machines at Mount Cesis. —Prof. Ansted says it is a curious sight to see a workman connect an elastic tube of half an inch diameter with one of these machines, and watch the result when a tap is turned. A piston-rod, in a short cylinder, immediately flies backwards and forwards with wonderful rapidity, regulated by a small but rather heavy fly-wheel. Immediately a ponderous chisel, (J or 7 feet long and more than an inch'in diameter, is set in motion, and strikes a succession of heavy blows against the stone. Each time that the chisel strikes it is withdrawn a little way, slightly turned, and immediately strikes again in the same hole. The stone experimented upon being of the hardest and toughest kind, the effect is not seen for several strokes; but within two minutes, a steel chisel was completely blunted, and there was a hole two inches deep in the mass of quartzite. Holes are bored in this way in an hour that would formerly have taken a day. The machin...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Scientific Progress. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Scientific Progress. Cause op the Motion of Glaciers. —J. Croll, of the Geological Survey of Scotland, contributes an article upon this subject in the Philosophical Magazine, in which, after noting the fact that the ice of a glacier, though solid, nevertheless behaves in some respects like a plastic substance, he shows that it shears as it descends, in such a manner as to prove that some other force in addition to gravitation must be in action, that alone being insufficient to account for the phenomena. What, then, is that force? It is found that the rate of descent depends upon the amount of heat which the glacier receives. But in what way does the heat aid gravitation V We quote: " There seems to be but one explanation (and it is a very obvious one), viz: that the motion of the glacier is molecular. The ice descends molecule by molecule. The ice of a glacier is in the hard crystalline shite, but it does not descend in this state. Gravitation is a constantly acting force; if a part...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Correspondence. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Correspondence.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Bound East. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Bound East. Omaha to Chicago. Written for the Punas. The traveler who intends going from Omaha to Chicago may find himself involved in a puzzling predicament, rather similar to that in which a famous English wit was once placed. No doubt you ai%e all familiar with the story, but yet I'll risk re- ■ peating it. The gentlemen referred to, while musing in a grave-yard, found the following inscription on a tomb-stone: Stranger, reflect, while you paM by; As you are now, so once was I: Ah I 11111 now, so you must lie; Therefore prepare to follow me. r After reflecting, the wit added these lines: To follow you, I'm not content, Unless I know which way you went. In a similar manner, I was rather troubled how to get to Chicago, for there are three roads, making the connection, to chose from, viz: the Chicago and Northwestern, the ■ Chicago, Hock Island and Pacific, and the Burlington and Missouri River. I pondered over the matter, questioned every one who had tried either route, and finally...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notes of Travel in San Joaquin County. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Notes of Travel in San Joaquin County. Fine Ranches. [Continued from page 35.] Mr. Dodge is also the proprietor of 550 acres of fine land at the same place, all of which is under cultivation. He has a vineyard of 50 acres, and proposes to set 50 acres more of vines this year. He harvested 250 acres of wheat and 40 acres of barley last year. Mr. Shippee, of the firm of Shippee, McKee & Co., has one of the finest ranches in the country. It is situated five miles north from the city, on the Calaveras river, and comprises GOO acres. The river is on the I east or upper side, and the Cherokee Lane | Gravel Iload runs through its center. The ranch consists entirely of bottom land and can be irrigated at any and all seasons. At the season of the drought, it was irrigated and produced 40 bushels of wheat per acre, and two tons per acre of the best of oat ! hay. Last year it was again irrigated and I the grain sown in January and February, produced 35 to 40 bushels of wheat, 40 to...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

White Pine Bullion.—From January Ist, 1870, till December 31st, Wells, Fargo & Co. shipped from their office in this city, says the White Pine News, the following amount of bullion, which was produced only by mills in this district: Shipped West 647 bars—value, $738,802 78; shipped East, 642 bars—vahie, $851,862 88. Total, 1,289 bars; value, $1,590,665,56.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Home and Farm. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Home and Farm.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HISTORY AND PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

HISTORY AND PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURE. [Written for the Press.] It cannot be said with truth that husbandry is the oldest of human industries, much less, that it was the first means of human subsistence; but it is safe to assume that it was practiced during the primitive ages of the world, and it was, really, the first effort to stimulate the powers of Nature to a higher degree of productiveness, by artificial means .and agencies. At first, men had recourse to the natural productions of the earth for the supply of their material wants. At this period there was no systematic industry, no labor beyond that of gathering the wild fruits and of capturing the wild animals which grew spontaneously in the forests and streams. Next, follows pasturage, or the care of flocks and herds. This is, properly considered, one of the branches of agriculture, whose two-fold object is to draw from the soil the largest amount of products, vegetable directly and animal remotely. Pasturage was the first atte...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SILK AND FISH CULTURE IN NAPA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

SILK AND FISH CULTURE IN NAPA. Editors Press: —Two or three miles from Napa, a little to the left of the Sonoma road, and snugly nestling among the hills, is the country residence of Mr.W. H. Baxter. Mr. U. has quite a plantation of mulberry trees. He commenced with 15,000 moretti and 20,000 multieuulis; since which time they have increased •20,000, making in all 55,000 trees. The cocoonery is 45xH5 feet, two stories high, giving room to food over 8,000,000 silk worms. The time for feeding here begins about the first of May. Last year a late frost cut down the tender trees, leaving thousands of worms to perish for lack of proper food. This materially lessened the profits for the season. Profiting by all experiences of the past, Mr. IJ. Is still hopeful of complete suocess in this business. It occurs to me that then; are many other localities in this beautiful valley where silk culture would meet with better returns than in the place chosen by Mr. Baxter. A locality a little farther ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Apiary. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

The Apiary.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
NEW AND CHEAP FOOD FOR BEES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

NEW AND CHEAP FOOD FOR BEES. It is stated in the London Hardener \s Chronicle, that a correspondent of that paper has long been in the habit of supplying the London shops with fresh honey in the comb all the year round. In the hardest winter his supply was equal to the finest summer. How he succeeded in this was a mystery. It finally came to light that he fed his bees, in the absence of flowers, on a solution of the oil cake made from the seeds of the lene Plant [Sesamum Orientals) . Indeed he would boast that ho wanted no flowers for his bees. The Sesamum Orientale, or Bone, is cultivated in various parts of the world, both as food and for oil. The oil remains sweet for a long time, and is sometimes used as a substitute for sweet oil. In China and Cochin China it is used as a substitute for butter in preparing various dishes. It is cultivated to a considerable extent in several of the Southern States. It is sown in drills about four feet apart, in the month of April, and the seeds ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
BUCKWHEAT—ITS POISONOUS EFFECTS—THE HONEY BEE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

BUCKWHEAT—ITS POISONOUS EFFECTS—THE HONEY BEE. There is in buckwheat an essence or medicinal principle upon which its irritating qualities depend, and is called apis veneuum or " bee poison." This is one of the sources from whence the common honey bee obtains its poison; hence, the same disagreeable effects follow the immediate use of honey when obtained from the buckwheat. The bee takes from the flower a portion of its medicinal virtues with the saccharine matter of the plant, which, by passing through the internal laboratory of the insect, becomes separated into its primary oonstituents of ajris venenmn and honey; the one being deposited in cells for the sustenance of the insect, and the other laid by within itself as a means of defence. Now, in making this separation in the chemical laboratory of the insect (or by accident where dead bees are in the honey Avhile being rendered), it often occurs that portions of this poison are mixed with the honey, producing all the disagreeable ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE OUACHITA GRAPE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

THE OUACHITA GRAPE. Some few weeks since we made some reference to tlie Ouachita grape, wliich was being cultivated in Arkansas, and which was said to possess a perfect immunity from the attacks of blight and mildew. Since making that mention we have received a copy of the Southern Standard, published at Arkadelphia, Ark., from which we learn that many years ago, while the French were still in possession of that territory, they were greatly troubled to make any of the ordinary varieties of the grape grow there, on account of the blight and rot. Their attention was finally called to a native wild grape, a prolific bearer, and free from the attacks above mentioned. On transplanting it to their gardens, it was found to improve greatly in size and quality, even rivalling the most approved imported varieties in cultivation there. A few years since cuttings of this vine were sent to France, where it immediately become very popular, yielding wine of finer quality an<l better fla...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
BEET SUGAR PROFITS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

BEET SUGAR PROFITS. A correspondent of Wednesdays Bulletin who has been figuring against the Commercial Herald correspondent on the subject of Beet Sugar manufacture, makes a most gratifying as well as reasonable showing. He sets down the total expense of a 50-ton sugar mill, for one year, engaged seven months in working the beets and the other five in preparing the crude sugars produced—including interest on capital and commissions on sales, at $147,102. The value cf sugar produced, at present market rates, and allowing only 5 per cent, for the yield of the beets, is set down at $195,300; leaving a profit of $48,198. This, it will be observed, is over and above a reasonable interest on the investment. Moreover no account is made of the "waste" or syrup, which two items should not be set down at less than fifteen or eighteen thousand dollars. It is possible that the figures of the Bulletin's correspondent may be somewhat exagerated, as it is quite evident was the case with the write...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Industrial Miscellany. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Industrial Miscellany.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Colonization Movements. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Colonization Movements. The idea of a rapid settling up of the large territorial area bordering upon and within the great Rocky Mountain range, by a system of colonization, is being quite actively discussed by writers and political economists on both sides of the Atlantic. The wonderful success which has attended the "Greeley Colony," where a large town, with substantial blocks of buildings, beautiful avenues, ornamented with trees, and fountains, public edifices, etc., has grown up, as by magic, in a single season, is operating as a wonderful stimulus in this direction. The "lust for gold" which, for the last 20 years, has been the stimulating medium for attracting settlers to the Rocky Mountain and Pacific Slopes, enters but very little, if at all, into this new movement. The aim is to build up permanent settlements upon an agricultural and manufacturing basis. Farmers, who more than any other class of population, form the bone and sinew of a country, art; over slow to change the ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Hughes' Patent Lantern. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

Hughes' Patent Lantern. Had Diogenes been provided with the lantern here illustrated he might possibly have had less difficulty in his search after a wise man; for, in justice to those ancient times, we may be allowed to hope that the chief trouble in the discovery of such a man arose not from the great scarcity of the article, but rather from the want of sufficient length in the part of the searches. Mr. Hughes could have presented Mr. Diogenes with a good light-producer. We should like to have seen him recommending it to the old philosopher, as "strong, durable, easily kept in perfect order, and much better than that thing in your hand or any other now in use. Will be great economy for you to purchase, for it not only will ontwoar n down of the kind you now have, but will give so strong a light that you'll rind ten large men of the sort you're after in less time than it now takes to find one small one. "You see how the wire frame carries and protects the <A m*. ■■■■ tl ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Agricultural Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 28 January 1871

California Agricultural Notes. BhaDß Turks. -The Santa Clara Agricultural Society advertises for sealed proposals for furnishing 400 trees for its tair grounds—loo each of locust, Monterey Cyprus, South Carolina poplars and Australian blue gums. Blooded Stock.—The Solano Republican of Jan. 19th says: Five head of Durham cows came up on the Amelia on Tuesday night. They belong to Lewis Peirce, anil were recently imported from England. Salinas Valley is about eighty miles long, with an average of seven miles m width. The Standard estimates the area of agricultural land to be 550,000 acres. Some of it is very rich and wonderfully productive—l4o bushels of barley having been produced to the acre in some places. The greater portion of the valley is owned in large grants, but the proprietors are beginning to sell off portions, as the best way to enhance the value of the balance. Probably one-fourth of that valley is under cultivation. Barley in Omco. —Farmers near Chioo are holding on to ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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