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Elephind.com contains 503 items from On The Record, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

p 0 n m low LEASING" RETREATDENTON.COM | TEXT RETREATUNT to 47464 The Retreat Clubhouse 1451 Centre Place 3r, Denton, TX 76205 | 940.387.0627 ^

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

etf/ft UNT students, Welcome to the new academic year! I have enjoyed getting to know so many of you this past year and am excited about the new students joining us. I am here to help you reach your goals. UNT is a big campus but maintains an environment where each individual counts. You can depend on your UNT family to help you, from your professors to your advisors to your fellow students. We promise you a high-quality education and a fulfilling college experience so you can learn and grow. The quality of your education also depends on you, so take care of yourself by: • Asking questions. • Getting to know your professors. Just go up after class and introduce yourself. • Remembering that we are not teaching anything that you can't learn (we screened you before we admitted you), but you may have to go over it more than once before it sticks. • Taking advantage of the opportunities to do research, study abroad and get involved in student organizations. This is going to be an especia...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

«? ^A 'c- ' w N • 6b. What is NextGen? NextGen classes have been redesigned into a format much different than your traditional college class. What do you get from a NextGen class? • Small group experiential learning to help make those big classes feel small • Less time in your seat listening to lecture, more time to spend interacting with your classmates • Foundational materials that are put online which can give you flexibility in your schedule • NextGen instructors that are really invested in giving you the best experience possible in the classroom • A solid list of what the instructor needs you to know to be successful in his or her class For more information, visit: nextgen.unt.edu nex E H a ti e n next generation

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

What's Inside... I 11 imH I ywa ! ■j- I Saw Them Kill By HART STILWELL Did George HarielJ kill Sam Bass? How coul every window or door. How could anybody kno An old-time Texan, still living, iells how Roun outlaw. THE Texas Rangers knew Sam Bass was going to fob the bank at Round Roclc. which is only eighteen miles from Austin, capital of the Lone Star State. They knew when he was going to rob It, Jim Murphy, a member of Sam Bass & Co., had turned Informer and told them. But what the devil could the Rangers do about it? There were only a few Rangers in Austin, and the Ranger Service didn't dare send them out They were there to guard The state treasury, and they were guarding it day and night Who could guarantee that Sam Bliss & Co., wouldn't move in and rob the stale treasury? And II they did. why the Texas Rangers would simply be laughed out of existence. Already Sam Bass had made a monkey out of a whole army of law officers, gathered more than a hundred strong in Dallas, w...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

What's Inside... Cover Story John B. Denton Looking inside the life and contributions of the city's namesake Explore Goatman Racism leads to a chilling ghost story at Old Alton Bridge Photo Story Denton's changes over the course of two cen- turies come to life Centennial Residents celebrate their city's 100th birthday Past Headlines Old articles capture some of Denton's strangest moments Experience Armistice and Fair A reflection on two memorable Denton festivities Campus Chat Residents' thoughts on potential historic landmarks Traditions The Mean Green spirit is on display with these UNT customs Museum Exhibits shed light on Denton's past Deserted Building Abandoned structure was once used as a firehouse Information Trivia, Music, By the Numbers Find answers to our trivia questions and learn music facts TEXAS IMMH A \

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Editor's Letter: If you drive the speed limit about 10 miles west of Denton on Highway 380, it's easy to miss the tiny town of Stony. Deep within the heart of Denton County it's home to a man who has dedicated his life to saving North Texas historic buildings from destruction. Bill Marquis, owner of Marquis Restoration and Preservation, works with old-fash- ioned tools and authentic materials to bring decaying, yet important, historic buildings back to life. Exploring Denton As a rookie staff writer at the NT Daily, I stumbled across Bill while reporting on the grand opening of the Denton African American Museum, which he restored. I had no idea who Bill was or what this man in his 60s could accomplish. However, after seeing the resurrected structure on Sycamore Street, I had to find out more about his craft. Looking back, had I not dug deeper, I never would have known he owns one of the most seminal structures in Denton History the oldest house in Denton County. The 16- by 6-foot l...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

UNT WELLS FARGO Make the most o your enhanced Mean Green Card he University of North exas and Wells Fargo have teamed up to bring you the enhanced Mean Green Card UNT UNIVERSITY OF NOF1 i* EXAS ^000 1E34- 5b18 R010 ™R 2011 : Lisa Student Student 6/15 DEBIT VISA Student ID & Visa® debit card 1. Personalize it Take your picture at the Campus ID Systems Office Eagle Student Services Center 1st Floor 940-565-4481 2. Order it Visit the local Wells Fargo banking location and ask for an enhanced Mean Green Card when you open a Wells Fargo College Checking^ account2. Wells Fargo - UNT UNT University Union 3rd Floor 940-384-6500 Monday - Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 3. Use it • As your official student ID • For campus privileges • For free access to cash at Wells Fargo and Wachovia ATMs nationwide • To make purchases anywhere Visa debit cards are accepted It's your campus ID and a isa debit card 'The enhanced Mean Green Card is a Visa debit card issued b...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Meet the Staff Sean Gorman Managing Editor "I was shocked to find that the Denton courthouse burned down twice, once by a member of Sam Bass' gang." Senior Staff Wri ters Isaac Wright Ashley-Crystal Firstley Alex Macon Senior Staff Photographers James Core as Chelsea Stratso Sara Jones Visuals Editor "It came as a surprise to me that the UNT name has changed as many as six times." Senior Staff Designer Samantha Guzman Staff Writers Pablo Arauz Nicole Balderas Matthew Malone Brett Medeiros Ann Smaj stria Alicia Warren Alex Young Sydnie Summers Design Editor "I think the story about how John B. Denton was buried three d iff rent times is really interesting." Contributing Writer Josh Pherigo Staff Photographers Justin Curtin Jun Ma Brian Maschino

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Best of Denton: H 1. Campus Theatre Location: 214 W. Hickory St. Then: The vibrant pink and green neon lights of the Campus Theatre's unmistakable vertical marquee have made it one of the most recognizable landmarks in Denton County. Located just off the courthouse square, the Campus Theatre first opened in 1949 as a state-of-the-art movie house geared to attract the city's growing student population. It remained in operation as a working movie theatre until 1985. Now: The Denton Community Theatre bought the property in 1990, and after a $2 million renovation project, more than 1200 people showed up for the grand re-opening in 1995. It's served as the permanent home of the city's performing arts program ever since. Last summer the Theatre was designated an official Texas State Historic Landmark. Highlights: In 1967, the theatre hosted the world premiere of "Bonnie and Clyde," which was filmed throughout the Denton area. 3. Old Alton Br dge Location: Near the intersection of Old Alto...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

istoric Landmarks -Josh Pherigo, Contributing Writer Ponder Dish enton CoiinthX / 3771 Cross Road? Oak Point Shady Shores I Kd La J1 V Norlhlake ray? Argyle- / L Corral City Justin @> Roanok Copper Canyon Mi yv Highland Village Bartonville x Double Oak SfcTS LewisuilFe Marshall Creek Trophy Club Westlake Flower Mound -1 _ k Grapevine Photos by Chelsea Stratso and James Coreas/Senior Staff Photographers and courtesy of Silver Spur Saloon. Map courtesy of Google Maps £k 4. \i

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

I ' he City's History of Extreme Weather While Denton doesn't sit on an active fault line or along the Gulf Coast in the path of hurricanes, the city resides in Tornado Alley and is no stranger to treacherous weather. As many native Texans know, the weather in the Lone Star State can be unpredictable. In Denton, this translates into harsh winters, sweltering summers and a year-round threat of storms. When it Rains, it Pours High waters damaged about 100 Denton homes and businesses in April 2007, when Denton County received 5 to 10 inches of rain in only two hours. No deaths were reported from the flooding, but the high water cost the county a total of $3 million in damages. Denton Mayor Mark Burroughs said Denton's drainage system is in need of improvement so heavy rains won't bring the city to a standstill. The problem, Burroughs said, is the costs necessary for such a project. "It takes a vastly disproportionate amount of capital expenditures to address even relatively small areas...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Union: Through the Ages Acting as a place for students on campus to visit daily, the UNT Union building has experienced change and expansion during its history of more than 100 years. Making of the Memorial Plans for a Student Memorial Union Building at UNT began in 1928, when alumni announced a drive to raise funds for it The building was dedicated to UNT alumni mili tary veterans. The Memorial Union was completed in 1949, on the 50th anniversary of the estab- lishment of UNT as a state institution. A Fresh Start The Memorial Union Building was demolished in 1963 to build a facility that would fit UNT's growing student popula- tion. Construction on the second Union began the same year. Expansion for the new union was approved in 1973 with a $7 million budget. During the construction period, Crumley Hall was used as a temporary union. It was completed in March 1976. More renovations came in 1997. A food court was built on the first floor, and a seating area was created where a facul...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Downtown Denton Develops After 154 years of existence, Denton continues to expand, especially down- town. Ron Menguita, Development Review Liaison for the City of Denton said the area will experience short term changes created in the Downtown Implementation plan. "The biggest thing that came out of those plans was growth management," Menguita said. "We want to make sure we get development, but at the same time manage our resources." The May 2011 Statistical Trends and News of Denton report said Denton is ranked 13 among the top 25 fastest growing cities in the nation for popula- tions over 100,000 persons. Downtown Plan The purpose of the city's Downtown Implementation Plan is to draw busi- nesses downtown and to create a unique atmosphere for the area. The plan, which can be found at the City of Denton website, includes a summary of the current state of downtown and suggestions for the area's infrastructure and land. Suggestions include adding new buildings in accordance with Leade...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Fry Street Before and After In the 1920s, Denton's Fry Street was considered the city's cultural core. Brooks Dairy and Eagle Cafe were among the first businesses established on the street. The well-known street was originally a fair- ground, but evolved into an epicenter of Denton. Its proximity to the North Texas State Teachers College, now called UNT, helped create the change. Fry's Second Coming The second evolution of Fry Street happened more gradually. The grocery stores, shoe shops and beauty parlors that occupied the bustling city block were slowly replaced with restaurants, bars, music venues and other establishments fitting a developing college town. Looking to Fry's Future Starting this summer, Fry Street will undergo another major reinvention as it transforms into the Fry Street Village a project spearheaded by real estate company Axis Realty. "It will be primarily a student housing project, but there will be approximately 12,000 square feet of retail and restau- rant sp...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Photo by Ashley-Crystal Firstly/Senior Staff Writer • ' A W v * \ A ix v(^ Bsi c" " • ' ' >« - \ *0-v' 'X ■ 4\ " < Framed in the middle of the Denton Square is a three-story 19th century cream and pink courthouse that's been considered the sparkling jewel of Denton for the last 114 years. The Denton courthouse, also known as courthouse-on-the-square, has survived two fires, two restorations and still overlooks the Square. No other place In Denton resembles the courthouse, said Gretel L'Heureux, tourism and education director of the courthouse. "The center of Denton is really here," L'Heureux said. "This is where it all started." Restoration What started as a meeting place under a tree just south of Denton became a log cabin n Alton. Over time, three other buildings replaced the log cabin as Denton's courthouses on the square, L'Heureux said. The first official courthouse was a wooden two-story frame structure in 1875 where the Candy Store on Oak Street is today, but it was bur...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Quakertown's Quagmire Denton Settlers Were Forced to Relocate Although Quakertown Park now serves as a 32-acre recreational field for city events, more than a hundred years ago, it was Denton's first African-American settle- ment. The area was named for abolitionist Quakers who helped slaves escape the South on the Underground Railroad. According to the Denton County website, Quakertown was founded in 1875 by about 27 African-American families. These fami- lies moved to the Denton area from Dallas in search of a better life, and by the 1880s had built a thriving community. By 1910, more than 50 families inhabited Quakertown. The settlement continued to grow as the residents built churches, homes and businesses along Oakland Avenue and McKinney Street. Despite a strong foundation, the commu- nity was short-lived. Around 1920, grass roots campaigns to remove Quakertown emerged because the College of Industrial Arts, nowTWU, feared its proximity to Quakertown would hurt the school's ch...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Three years ago, the First Cumberland Presbyterian Church called Linda Hackler of the Denton Independent Order of Odd Fellows for help to unload 600 pumpkins for its annual Fall Festival. Hackler and other members of the I.O.O.F. were initially unaware of the number of pumpkins but still took each pumpkin and helped decorate for the event. As the second oldest fraternity in Denton, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows has continued its duty to serve the community to aid others for 150 years. "We are the most active lodge in the state of Texas," said Hackler, secretary of Denton I.O.O.F. They Were Rather "Odd" I.O.O.F. is known for its name because during the 17th century, people consid- ered it odd to find residents gathering to help others for the benefit of mankind, according to the organization's website, ioof.org. Its principles were founded on the ideals of friendship, love and trut h carrying the responsibility "to visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead and educ...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Lady of the Legislature Take a trip to the archives room in Willis Library and it's easy to see memorabilia from years past at UNT. On the wall hangs a picture of Judge Sarah T. Hughes, the woman to whom the archives is dedicated. She and many other women have passed through Denton and left their mark on the city As a legislator, judge, political leader and feminist, Hughes lived a life devoted to the social liberalism movement. According to an excerpt from the book "Reinventing the State: Social Liberalism for the 21st Century," social liberalism focused on various social and economic ssues like unemployment and health care. Even her detractors can agree that one of the things that made Judge Hughes distinctive, and yes, admirable, was that you always knew where she stood," as quoted from an editorial in the Dallas Morning News. Hughes was born Sarah Augusta Tilghman in Baltimore in 1896. A testa- ment to the dedication she showcased throughout her life, Hughes lived in a tent with...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Texas' Most Wanted iUD tn& ^5 Wi j? riii® ©GIT- ,Tt o ,11 ,sv^lt h*#* 1 ^§§§#1^#^ fgf^35""" In Denton's beginnings, North Texas was a wide, open landscape acting as the stage for the same lawless- ness of the Old West roman- ticized by modern films and books. One histor- ical figure known for his pursuits on the prairie was Sam Bass, the train robber who spent time preying on the rail- ways around Denton County and Dallas. Bass' greatest heist was at the Union Pacific train at Big Spring Station, Neb., in 1877, according to an article in the Frontier Times. A year later, Bass and his gang turned its atten- tion to Texas railways. "He would go from Pilot Knob in Denton County down to Round Rock, in between Austin and Salado," said Jim Heath, a member of the Denton County Historical Commission. "Everything from Aust in toward Denton was his territory. He drifted back and forth." Treasure hunters have long been convinced that the outlaw's swift return to robbery after the Union Pac...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — On the Record — 12 August 2011

Hiding From the Law From the folk song "The Ballad of Sam Bass" to hushed rumors of his old haunts carrying a curse, few legends are as notorious as Sam Bass, the Texas train robber. Bass earned $10,000 during the heist of a Union Pacific Train, worth $200,000 today, but kept stealing, leading treasure hunters to speculate Bass hid his share of the gold from the law in caves. Sam Bass Cave(s) Few Denton residents are aware of a place known as Sam Bass Cave and even fewer can point it out on a map. Jim Heath, a member of the Denton County Historical Commission, said the cave was located at Pilot Knob, a cliff face surrounded by trees that faces Interstate Highway 35W about three miles south of Denton. However, Richard McCaslin, the chairman of UNT's history department, said he believed the cave was located at Bolo Point on Grapevine Lake. An article in the Denton Record Chronicle published in 1947 mentioned a third cave in Roanoke dubbed "Sam Bass Cave." Heath said Bass' area of oper...

Publication Title: On The Record
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
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