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Title: Grenville Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HEROIC INCIDENTS OF THE WAR. "A Sma' Matter." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

HEROIC INCIDENTS OF THE WAR. "A Sma' Matter." Here is a typical instance of sol diers' heroism in battle and stoicism in suffering:—After the marvellous charge of the Highlanders- on the German heavy guns oear nanbourdin recently, a Hussar was sent "with a message to the base. On the way he encountered a Seaforth High lander going in. the same direction. Something in the man's set face prompted the question: "Are you hurt?" "Aye, a sma' matter," was the reply, A small matter, truly; the man's arm was shattered from shoul der to elbow. "Are you going to sick bay?" said the cavalryman. "It's a mile and a-nalf away. Get on my gee." "No, no," said the Scot. "I'll just walk. You'll find many worse hit than me."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Equal To It. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

Equal To it. A young couple were observed as ' soon as they entered a railway car riage and immediately put down as a bridal pair. But they were remark ably self-possessed, and acted just like old married folk, so that after a ■ short time the other passengers be gan to doubt their belief after all. As the train moved out, however, the young man rose to remove his overcoat, and a shower of rice fell out. The passengers smiled. broadly. But even that did not affect the youth who also smiled, and, turning to his partner, remarked audibly: "By Jove! Mary, I've brought away the bridegroom's overcoat!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE SIGNS OF A GOOD FARMER. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

THE SIGNS OF A GOOD FARMER. It is not necessary to get out a search warrant and take testimony of all the neighbors to find out whe ther a man is a good farmer or not. Think about it a bit. Even though the man be an entire stranger to us, it is not difficult to know just about what kind of a far mer he is. I If he is a good farmer his house 1 and its surroundings look neat and | trim. Boards are not flapping in the wind. They have been painted re cently. You know without going in to inquire that the owners are nice and comfortable. You look around the sheds and the fence corners, and you will not see any farm tools rusting and working for the manufacturer. Even the wag gons used to-day have been drawn in out of the reach of storm and sun shine. If it is the time of the year when fences are apt to get out of repair, you will find that the owner has been around and fixed every spot that need ed fixing. He was tired when he finished that job, but he slept well and is calm in his mind n...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
JAPANESE BRAVERY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

JAPANESE BRAVERY. The remarkable bravery of the Jap anese soldiers was well displayed in an incident which occurred when the Allies lay under fire from the walls of Tientsin. The Japanese held two rows of huts along the south canal. Between these two rows was an open space, commanded by the Chinese fire. A soldier was started with a verbal order across the zone. Within 30 yards he fell dead. Another sol dier instantly dashed out with the message, and he fell likewise. Like clockwork a third soldier ran out, and there was a roar of cheers from the Allies as the brave Japanese made the trip in safety.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How to Do It. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

How to Do It. A farmer wrote to the editor of an agricultural paper as follows: "I have a horse that has been afflicted for the past year with periodical fits of dizzi ness. Please let me know what I should do with him, as" he seems to get worse instead of better. I am afraid he will be unfit for work if something is not done soon." In tJio novf iaane this answar an peared: "When the nag is looking all right, sell him to someone." "Father," asked the young woman one day, "the piano is really my very own, isn't it?" "Why, yes, my dear." "And when I marry," she contin ued, "I can take it with me, can't I?" "Certainly, my dear," replied the father, "but don't tell anyone; it might injure your chances." In the field Mr. William Potts, of the Mangoldmere C.C., is nothing really great. Three times in the opening match of the season he muff ed dolly chances offered him by one of the opposition batsmen, and at lunch-time the thrice lucky man was still not out with eighty-seven runs to his c...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
No Airs About Her. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

No Airs About Her. "Airs!" exclaimed the proud mother, and shook her head vigorous ly. "My Elsie, for all her learning, hasn't any more airs, so to speak, than her poor old dad." "Then she won't turn up her nose at her old friends?" queried the visi tor. "La, no!" "How refreshing! Most girls who go through college nowadays will hardly look at you after they've gra duated." "Well, they ain't like my Elsie, that's all I can say," retorted Elsie's ma. "She's become a carnivorous reader, of course, and she frequent ly importunates music. But stuck up —my Elsie? Not a bit. She's unani mous to everybody, has a most infan tile vocabulary, and, what's more, never keeps a caller while she dres ses up. No; she just runs down, iiom de plume, as she is."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How It Happened. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

How It Happened. "I believe our climate is chang ing." "Think so?" "Our winters seem to be getting warmer." "Well, women wouldn't wear enough clothes, the climate had to I change—the women wouldn't." -

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE OTHER FELLOW'S JOB. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

THE OTHER FELLOW'S JOB. There's a craze among us mortals that is cruel, hard to name, Wheresoe'er you find a human you will find the case the same; Vou may seek among the worst of men or seek among the best, And you'll find that every person is precisely like the rest. Each believes that his real calling is along some other line Than the one at which he's working —take, for instance, yours or mine; From the meanest "me-too" creature to the leader of the mob, There's universal craving for the "other fellow's job." There are millions of positions , in the busy world to-day, Each a drudge to him who holds it, but to him who doesn't, play; Every farmer's broken-hearted that in youth he missed his call, While that same unhappy farmer is the envy of us all. Any task you care to mention seems a vastly better lot Than the one especial something which you happen to have got. There's but one sure way to smother envy's heartache and her'job: Keep too busy at your own to want "the other fellow'...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOUSEHOLD BRIGADE'S "MOONLIGHT CHARGE." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

I : I THE HOUSEHOLD BRIGADE'S "MOONLIGHT CHARGE." In 1822 the Household Cavalry Life Guards and Horse Guards Blue had not "been on foreign service for over half a century, "Waterloo" being the last battle honor inscribed on their colors. The proposition that these "six-foot sword-wielders" should be shipped to Egypt for desert "war fare aroused much criticism and some little sarcasm. To the land of the Nile, however, they went, and on Au gust 28 were at Kassassin. General Graham sent a verbal order to Gen eral Drury Lowe, commander of the Cavalry Brigade, to sweep around and attack the enemy's flank. The. mes sage arrived late; the men had had a long and weary night march, and were fatigued and hungry when the time came for action. The Royal Horse Artillery first opened fire, to shake the foundation of the Egyptian Infantry. Then Drury Lowe ordered Colonel Ewart (Lieutenant-Colonel Second Life Guards) to lead his men forward. Colonel Ewart's three squadrons made a thundering charge ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE TRUST MEETING. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

THE TRUST MEETING. The Trust was represented by Crs Oman and Currie (Hampden), Slater, Lewis, Roddis, Stewart and Carstairs (Ripon), Kennedy and Clarke (Gren ville), and the secretary and treasurer, Messrs Smith and Fick. Routine business having been tran sacted, Cr Oman placed the plan before the meeting and explained the situation. In the course of his remarks he said that the first intimation he had of the new survey was a report in the " Gren ville Standard/' When he inspected the plan he was agreeably surprised to find that it did not take in M'Intyre's or Jarvis's houses, which meant very much less compensation. He did not consult any individual member of the Trust, so they all approached the sub ject with open minds. He thought the decision of the Trust would determine the site of the station. There were two ways of getting over the business, to see some of the owners who had been already compensated and ascertain if they would take back the land that would no longer be requi...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TION OF SITE. Skipton Railway Station. TRUST RECOMMENDS ALTERA LOCAL OPINION STILL DIVIDED. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 20 February 1915

TRUST RECOMMENDS ALTERA TION OF SITE. LOCAL OPINION STILL DIVIDED. For some time past the burning ques tion at Skipton has been the site or the local railway station. When the recrea tion reserve was chosen as the site by the departmental surveyors, opposition was raised, and a petition was pre pared, principally by Hampdenshire re sidents, protesting against the aliena tion of the reserve. A number of residents in the Riponshire portion con sidered that their interests would best be served by allowing the reserve to be taken for railway purposes, and a coun ter petition was got up, and a move made to obtain a recreation reserve on their side of the township. The effect of all this was to divide the township, more intensely than it had ever been divided before, into two rival factions. The struggle went on with varying fortunes, each side appealing to the Railway Trust and pulling other strings as opportunity occurred, until the Minister of Railways consented to go to Skipton, inspe...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Smythesdale Borough Council Wednesday, 24th February. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

"Wednesday, 24th February. Present:—Mayor M'Menamin, Or Creed, Harridge, Reitze, Kirk, and Elder. An apology being tendered for Cr Williamson. CORRESPONDENCE. From Lands and Survey Department, sending voucher for signature for £10, also stating that a further £10 should be spent by Juue next. From secretary of St. Patrick's Day Festival, asking patronage of conncil, also to have St, Patrick's Day gazetted as a public holiday at Suiythesdale. From the Shire of Grenville, stating that tliey did not intend to give the •territory asked for by the Boroughs of Scarsdale and Smythesdale. The town clerk's monthly statement showed a debit balance of £110. GENERAL BUSINESS. It was decided to write to the Railway Department to ask them to put binding on the rough metal on the footpath leading to the railway station. Several repairs that are needed to bridges were left in the hands of the town clerk.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Obituary. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

The remains of the late Mr John Taylor Helrae, a very old and respected resident of Smythesdale, were interred in the Smythesdale Cemetery on Mon day. The funeral was well attended. The coffin-bearers were Messrs George, John, and Robert Boyd, and J. Ives. The pall-bearers were Messrs T. Dick son, W. H. Hockridge, P. Dalton, T. Baddeley, A. White, G. Master, A. Camming, J. Lusk, 23". Schwartz and C. Schwartz. The Rev. G. Lee, assisted by the Rev. R. L. Reed, conducted the funeral service. Mr M. J. Veal was the undertaker. The funeral of Elizabeth, daughter of Mr and Mrs Jas. Wilson, of Derri nallum, and grand-daughter of Mr and Mrs Jas. Kerr, of Lucky Woman's, took place on Friday last at the Smythesdale Cemetery and was well attended. The coffin-bearers were relatives of deceased. The Rev. W. J. Murray read the burial service and Mr James Nelson carried out the funeral arrangements. It can be stated upon the highest au thority that the Allied Governments be lieve that the war will ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Sporting Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

By HOTSPUR. There should be a good attendance at Flemington to-day to witness the usual popular Newmarket programme. The Newmarket Handicap may go to Fraquette, S.4., Amata, 8.O., Flash of Steel, 7.9., Achernar, 7.O., or Miss Meadows, 6.12. I will place Flash of Steel 1st., Fraquette 2nd., and Achernar 3rd. Other events :— Pines Hurdle—Milkabah or King's . Ransom. St. Leger—Mountain Knight or Naxbery. Sires Produce Stakes—Nicanor or Two. Essendon Stakes—Land of Song or De Gama. Brnnswick Stakes—Winnipeg or Meritus. For the Australian Cup on Tuesday next I like Naxberv or Lempriere.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mining News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

-G The east crosscut from the 475ft. leval at the Scarsdale mine has been ex tended to 53ft. The country passed through is similar to that met with in the crosscut at the 375ffc. level. In the face the\' have a sand-stone bar, with quartz veins pitching east. These carry a little gold. This drive has not yet tapped the water under the 375ft. level south drive. Ther" is a good supply of water in the dam, and they hope, to have the mill cfmpleted in about three weeks. At the new Jubilee the plat has been completed for the 1100ft. level opening, and the draw lift placed iu position. Crossedtting will now be commenced for the lode. Stoning is carried on north from No. 1 and south from No. 2 rises. The stone, varying from 1ft. to 2ft. is payable. A prospector, J. M'Kay, lias dis covered a cross-country lode located about half a mile north frcm the old Bice's mine. Down to a depth of 14ft. the stone varies from oin. to 18in. wide. A parcel of 6 tons treated at Pearce's Battery, Ballarat, ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FRONTIERS IN THE OLD WORLD AND THE NEW. Do Armaments Provoke Wars? [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

FRONTIERS IN THE OLD WORLD AND THE NEW. Do Armaments Provoke Wars? If they were not so deeply engross ed just now in the work of mutual butchery, we would inv'te the war ring nations of the continent of Europe to contemplate the following very significant facts (says the "Scientific American). First, that here, on the continent j of America, the two greatest nations of the world, have a common fron tier, which extends, unbroken, for some four thousand miles. Second, that throughout the whole vast reach of it there is not to be found, on either side, a single forti fication, or any offensive or defensive military work of any kind whatso ever. Third, that leading up to, crossing it, or running parallel with this fron tier, there does not exist a single so called military railway—every line of railway communication having been built with a single eye to the develop ment of the natural resources of the two countries, and the mutual ex change of the products of peaceful in dustry. Fourth...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BIG SUCCESS. Or, Henry Martin's Invention. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

A BIG SUCCESS. Or, Henry Martin's Invention. In a humble stonemason's work shop two men stood facing each oth er. The younger was stalwart, ruddy cheeked, and bold-eyed, and, though defiant in manner, was apparently perfectly self-possessed. The elder, on the contrary, seem ed to have lost all control of himself. His powerfully-built frame was quiv ering, and his prematurely old face was pallid with anger. "Look a' here, sir," he roared, "do you know who 'you are talkin' to?" "Oh, yes, perfectly. I have the honor to address my respected fath er." A volume could scarcely have ex pressed greater contempt than Robert Martin threw into the last word. "Yes, sir; your own'father! Though anybody'd think it was some miser able ol' tramp, instid o' the man that has fed and clothed you 'n' done everything for you ever sence you was born!" "I rather think I'm in a fair way to pay off the debt, if we keep on many more years as we have the last three," sneered the young man. The father dashed th...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
UNWOMANLY WOMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

UNWOMANLY WOMAN. The true woman is never unfemin ine. It is the female who despises sex and its limitations, who hates home and children, who is eVer at war with men, who envies them, un dersells them, rates them, who has neither beauty, charm nor warm, na tural affections—she is the unsexed woman, though she may never have donned pantaloons or carried a gund, or even murdered, a harmless little bird.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GRETNA GREEN RECORDS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

GRETNA GREEN RECORDS. The volumes containing the records for two centuries of the romantic mar riages at Gretna Green have been tak en to America. Professor Glaister, of Glasgow University, was negotiating on behalf of the State for the purchase of the volumes, but they were secured for America, and are now there. The re cords showed that many noble fami lies entered into matrimony at the ro mantic blacksmith's shop on the Bor der line.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COURTING IN SPAIN. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 27 February 1915

COURTING IN SPAIN. Spain shows its individuality most in courtship and marriage. In 110 other country does love at first sight so often lead to marriage. The young unmarried girl of good social position never walks in the street without a chaperon, and it is quite permissible for any man who is at tracted by her to follow her. He must not walk abreast of her, nor ought he, on the first occasion, to speak to her. Having ascertained where she lives, if he is sincere in his pursuit, he makes frequent appearan ces under the window and continues to follow her when she and her cha peron go out. If his looks please, the lady Avill presently make an appearance on the balcony and enter into conversation with him. He may even talk to her when she goes out, and her chaperon will turn a deaf ear when the lady throws replies over her shoulder. In this way each discovers the social po sition of the other, and if independent inquiries by parents and guardians are satisfactory, the flirtation from ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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