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Elephind.com contains 3,586 items from Hawkesbury Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Best Baths. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

The Best Baths. People should select the kind of bath best suited to them. Those who can stand the cold bath are best off. The process of training should be commenced by taking a cold sponging, extending only to the neck and shoulders, then gradually increasing until one can get into a cold tub each morning. It should be inaugurated during the summer, as there is then much less shock and dis- comfort than in cold weather. Salt added to the bath is of undoubted ad- vantage. In the winter the bath should be taken in a well-warmed room, free from draughts. It is a frequent experi- ence to find that people become so hardened by the daily cold bath that they are almost free from colds.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Treachery of Lilies. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

The Treachery of Lilies. That delightfully fragrant and grace- ful flower of the season, the lily of the valley, is denounced by the German papers as under its simple beauty veiling   a deadly poison. It is stated that both jyrie ¿IftlUt! ttlifl. IHK ^JllLij ul -vtaM-dwlg*. plant contains prussic acid. It is ex- tremely dangerous to put the stalks into one's mouth, as, if the sap happens to get into even the tiniest crack in the lips, it produces swelling, often accompanied with severe pain. It is also advisable,   according to the ' British and Colonial Druggist,' not to throw the dead flowers where birds can get at them, for they often cause the death of young fowls and   pigeons.  

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Peculiar Marriage Custom. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Peculiar Marriage Custom. A very peculiar custom is prevalent in Lithuania. On the occasion of the celebration of marriage, the mother of the bride, in the presence of numerous witnesses, administers to her daughter a vigorous box of the ears. In case of dispute between the husband and wife at any later period, this blow may be cited as a plea for a divorce, she contending that she was constrained to enter the bonds of matrimony by physical force. Jones : 'Brown is very careful about his children, isn't hel* Jennings : ' Yes, he's trying to bring them up in the way he should have gone.'

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Real Scotch. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

    Real Scotch.   Parson Brown was an ardent sup- porter of the temperance movement, but the other day he greatly surprised, and (at first) delighted, " Pelsey," a local tradesman, who had called at the Manse on business, by inquiring if he would like some refreshment after his long walk. Visions of ambrosial nectar in the shape of his favourite beverage (made in Scotland) floated at once through the brain of Pelzey, who was always blessed (or otherwise) with a convenient thirst, as he eagerly replied in the affirmative. Alas for the vanity of human wishes, he was suddenly awakened to the realities of life when the good old parson arose from his seat, and going just out side the door of his apartment, where the interview had taken place, called out loudly, 'Mary, Mary. Oatmeal and water for two, please.'

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Trouble With His Neck. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Trouble With His Neck. Old Bob conceived the idea of having his life insured. 'Hour much do you weigh?' asked the examining physician. 'I weigh 'bout fifteen pounds more den   my wife does.* ' Well, how much does she weigh ?' ' I'ze do forget ; but she's a wopper, lemme tell yer.' 'How tall are you ?' ' Who-me?' 'Yes, you.'     ' Lemme see. Does yer know Abe   Sevier, what worked for old Plummer ?" ' No.' ' Waal, I'ze sorry, fer I ain't quite as tall as he is.' The doctor, after weighing old Bob and measuring his height, asked : ' How old are you ?' ' Who-me ? ' Yes, of course you. You are being examined.' - ' Dat's a fact. Waal, lemme see. My birthday comes in July, an' now whut I wants to git at is how many Julys I can recolleck. Ain't dat de pint.' ' Yes.' ' Waal, lemme see. Shure I don't know. Suppose we make it August instead of July ?' ' What difference would that make ?' ' Doan know, but it's jes ez easy.' ' I will put you d...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Is Justice Bliad? [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Is Justice Blind? A popular young man was brought   before a justice in Texas, charged with   the offence of kissing a young lady " by force ana agaínst her Will." The youug     lady, who was very handsome, gave her   testimony in a modest and straight-   forward manner, after which the justice   pronounced the following decision :   ' The Court in this case sympathises with the defendant, and will therefore   discharge him without a fine, imprison- ment, or reprimand, because the Court,   whilst this case has been in progress, has been obliged to hold on to both arms of his chair in order to keep from kissing complainant himself.'

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Went One Better. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Went One Better. In a certain town in England, there were two painters boasting about what they could do ; but after a long and exciting argument, one said to the other: ' Look here, Bill, the other day I painted a shilling on the ground, and a blind man who was passing by broke three fingers trying to pick it up.' 'Well,' replied the other, 'that is nothing compared to what I did.' ' What was that?' asked his com panion, in astonishment. 'Why, I painted a leg of mutton on   the pavement, and it looked so real that a hungry dog ate half the stone before he found out his mistake.'

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cabby Was Even With Him. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Cabby Was Even With Bim.   A cabby was once standing by his   cab, when a master came along and   stood quizzing at it, and tbe following   conversation ensued : Masher : ' Is that your cab ?' Cabby: 'Yes.' Masher: 'I weally thought it was a cat's-meat barrow.' Cabby : ' And so will à lot more people if they see puppies smelling around. You will oblige me by quietly shifting.'  

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Only a Mistake. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Only a Mistake. She was s smart and pretty girl, and   part of her duties was to write the advertisements for a large drapery establishment in the City. Her mind   used to run so much upon her business   that one day, when she wrote to her lover to meet her that night at home, she unconsciously added as a postscript : ' Come early and avoid the rush !' Mamma: 'I wonder what we will call the baby ?' Johnny: "I don't think we'd better call him any of the names papa called him last night when he was crying. He mightn't like it when he growed up.' Tom : ' May I kiss your little sister ?' Fanny (aged sixteen, demurely) : ' No, she isn't old enough.'

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
General News. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

General News. Ten per cent, of the Hawaiian natives are lepers. London is to have a school of instruc- tion for wireless telegraphy. Brazil will exhibit 600 varieties of serpents at the Paris display in 1900. The best marksmen are usually those with grey or blue eyes. The expenses of Great Britain are now about £100,000,000 yearly. In Russia it is the custom of pugilists to breakfast together after a contest. Windsor Castle has been used aa a Royal residence for nearly 800 years. There are 2,000 miles of gaspipes underlying the London streets. Naturalists are still in doubt as to whether the sponge is a plant or an animal. In a cubic foot of phosphorescent sea- water there have been found 25,000 living creatures. The water of the whole ocean, it is, estimated, contains in solution over 2,000,000 tons of pure silver. Fifty years ago there were but 620   Roman Catholic priests in England ; now there are 2,500. It is in the opinion of Professor Tyndall that blue-eyed women...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Short Story. A London Love Story. (Concluded.) [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Short Story. A London Love Story. By J. M. BARRIE, In the "Woman At Home."   (Concluded.)   "Materfamilias" writes : "I think your competitions wholesome and exhilarat- lng as a rule, but I must tell you that I object to the one about Helen's secret. You ask young girls to conceive them- selves in Helen's position, that is to say with 'almost a lover.' What is 'almost a lover'? We recognised no such person   in my young days, and I should be sorry to have my girls think they exist now and have privileges. P.S.-Is Helen a real person ? If so, is her surname Montgomery ? I ask In confidence, and from no mere curiosity.   Only one male competitor entered. He is an historical idiot, and gives us a list of cases in which women are well known to have kept a secret. I don't know whether the reader now needs to be told why Helen kept a secret. It is because she has forgotten it. One of the choicest pleasures in life, I take lt, is to be sh...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Warning to Cyclists. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

A Warning to Cyclists. Let the cyclist beware and the "scorcher" take heed. The warning comes from Sir Benjamin Richardson who, so far from being an enemy of the wheel, has used it for nearly twenty years. But scientific accuracy compels him to admit its dangers. Cyclists not unfrequently " over stimulate" ; and   when they do it is the heart that suffers. The circulation becomes disturbed, and by degrees a languor and feebleness that end in disinclination to ride come on. Here is an instrument called the   sphygmograph and it is this that has   enabled the eminent medicine man to   test the effects of cycling on the heart,   It shows cyclists to possess a quickened   circulation, and that after a time the   character of the stroke as a whole is   "very much like that produced by   alcohol."   In the famous cellars of the Hotel de Ville, at Bremen, there ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Sketcher. On Giddy Heights. The Experiences of a Steeplejack. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

The Sketcher.     On Giddy Heights. The Experiences of a Steeple jack. If any one wants a really giddy sensa-   tion without leaving his armchair, let him read the interview with a steeple- jack in the October number of the " English Illustrated Magazine." This particular steepie-jack has been at the work for five-and-thirty years, the dan- gers of the-trade have become a sort of second nature to him, and he thinks no more of scaling a chimney a hundred and seventy feet high than of " going upstairs to bed." Steeple-jack Seldom Killed. Strange as it may seem, steeple-jacks are very rarely killed nowadays-that is, when they keep sober ; but it was differ- ent when they flew kites :- " A man too his life in his hand in those days. I remember when I was a bit of a nipper watching a Black Coun- try steeple-jack swarm up a hundred feet shaft. He went to the work so drunk that he could hardly stand. When a man in the crowd spoke to him he said, ' Loo...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Germany's Young Man. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Germany's Young Man. Having given practical proofs of his proficiency in all the omer fine arts, the German Emperor has now established the fact that he is also capable of com- peting with the chef de cuisine. That he took any practical interest in the art of cooking had hitherto only been shown in his eulogies of the Empress's pastry, and his remark that it was better for a nation that its women should under stand the art of making pastry than that they should soar intellectually ever so high. But now his Majesty has bent his own great mind on inventing an ad- dition to the delicacies of the table. Being a German, he has, of course, pre- ferred to turn his attention to a bever- age. The Germans, as is well known, have a way of " doctoring" their hock on special occasions, by the addition of sugar, strawberries, peaches, or other seasonable fruit, into what they call a " bowie"-somewhat of an equivalent to our " cup." There is a classic as well as a romantic flavour about the innova...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Falling Down a Mountain Side. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Falling Down a Mountain Side,     A traveller in China tells, in the " Fortnightly Review," how he as- cended the sacred mountains, Sioo-outai- shan, and how he made the descent also, at a moment when he least ex- pected it. He had reached an altitude of over 9000ft, and having lost the trail, branched off, and climbed a lower peak, to see if he could discover the right track. He managed to crawl to the top, and there opened his paint box to make a sketch. He says:--As I was sorting out my brushes the stone on which I was sitting gave way, and I started sliding down the almost perpendicular slope. I tried to clutch the ground with my nails. I seized every projecting stone in the hope of stopping my pre cipitous descent ; but at the speed at which I was going it was no easy mat ter to hold on to anything which I man aged to clutch. There I had death star- ing me in the face, for another hundred yards would bring me to the edge of a   precipice, ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Champagne Trouble. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Champagne Trouble.   The misfortunes of a champagne drink- er have been an amusing episode during the late German manoeuvres (says the " Pall Mall Gaztte"). In the neighbour- hood of Sierck and in the towri of Metz a terrible rumour had suddenly spread that a great misfortune had befallen the German Emperor. Rumour, with her hundred tongues, and reporters with their thousand voices, were busy on the spot, and, as variety ts always pleasing, the French journal, " L'Avenir Militaire," produced its own special account by its own special correspondent, according- to which a whole squadron of dragoons had charged headlong into a stone quarry, with the satisfactory result of thirty corpses and some hundreds wounded. But what gave rise to no little surprise was that, when evening fell, neither the Emperor, nor the thirty corpses, nor the hundreds wounded were a penny the worse. It was a telegram, an individual named Kaiser, and the love of fine cham-   Ul^&amp...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Home. Odds and Ends. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

The Home.     Odds sad Ends. It has been said that "trifles make per- fection, and perfection is no trifle," and this is especially- true in the ordering of a house, for no housewife can hope to at- tain to any degree of perfection without due regard to the small things and trifles, the odds and ends, which in them- selves seem hardly worth troubling   about, but the doing or leaving undone of which makes an enormous difference in the comfort of the inmates of a house. Who does not know the annoyance of sitting down to write a letter and find- ing the ink in the ink-pot quite dried up, and the pen fit for anything rather than the use for which lt was ori- ginally intended? Again, who has not searched In vain for a piece of brown paper and string: with which to make a parcel, and finally being re- duced to doing lt up in newspaper and pinning- it at the corners; indeed, think- ing herself lucky if even newspaper and pins can be found? All this t...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
What All Girls Know but Many Forget. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

What All Girls Know bot Many Forget. That marriage is a lottery. That prettiness is the least of a wo- man's attractions. That so-called "Bohemianism" is a good thing to avoid. That affectation is readily detected and generally despised. That a white veil hides a multitude of drawbacks. That no woman, no matter how poor, can afford to be badly dressed. That it is not wise to confide too freely even in one's dearest friend. That it is not comfortable to be in love with more than two men at the same time.   That it would be wise for her to marry the first good man who is willing and able to support her. That you should make yourself as pretty as possible, and if you can't be pretty you should invariably be neat. That a distinguished physician says "men last longer than women because they have more fun," and that there is a moral in this. -"Woman."    

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Wet Blankets. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Wet Blankets. Who has not suddenly had the tide of pleasure arrested at its flood by the lack of sympathy and comprehension on the part of those from whom both were ex- pected ? A cold look, a disparaging re- mark, an unkind criticism, have brought in their train a hurt, uncomfortable feel- ing, slow to leave the mind, and sure to cheat it of the pleasure rightfully Its own. Young people especially, pleased and happy over some trifle, something done for them, or something they, have been able to do for another, have hurried in the first impulse of enthusiasm to tell a relative or acquaintance of their little triumph. You have done this, so have I, and this Is what has happened : Be ginning the story in the glow of full satisfaction, it has dawned on us that, there was no response from the party of the second part. Instantly we have been chilled and repelled, our confidences have seemed flat and childish, a half feeling of shame has marred our original gladness, or else a hot wave of...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Raiment. Wedding Fashions. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 20 October 1899

Raiment   Wedding Fashions. It is not customary for the bride to pay for the bridesmaids; dresses. If, how- ever, she asks a relative or intimate friend to act as bridesmaid, who is unable to pay for the costume herself, the bride, when she gives the invitation, should mention her wish to have the dress bought and made at her expense. Other wise it is understood that the bridesmaids are to pay all the expenses of their own costumes. It is said there will be many "white weddings," the bridesmaids' white satin gowns having merely some slight gold embroidery on chiffon by way of colour, while others will have narrow bands of brown fur, usually dark mink tails, as their trimming. The revers of these gowns do not lie flat, but are curved out ward from the bust, and are wired to keep them in shape_; they are then edged with the dark fur, and below the revers three large rhinestone buttons are placed down each side. Pink gowns of a very deep shade will remain in favour for the...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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