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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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PITCAIRN REVISITED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

  PITCAIRN BEVISITED.           Captain McNeely, of the Liverpool ship Monk- barn, from San Francisco, has been interviewed concerning the life and doings of the Pitcairn Is- landers. "We sighted the island of Pitcairn," said the captain, "on August 23, the weather being beautiful and calm as a clock. Soon after a boat pushed out from the shore, and 14 islanders, with the Governor, boarded us. When nearing our vessel they sang beautifully one of Sankey's hymns, which echoed grandly on the silent waters. They brought choice fruit and vege- tables, and all sorts of tropical produce. They were most eager for soap of American manufac- ture. They were most grateful, though their gifts considerably exceeded ours. The Governor of the island, named James McCoy, is about 55 years old, and was most amiable and courteous. Previous to sunset they did not trade with any- one on board, but after that time they struck up...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FINGER AND THUMB DENTISTRY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

FINGER AND THUMB DENTISTRY.   A prominent English dentist has given up the use of forceps for pulling teeth, and has adopted the primitive method of the Chinese, using nothing but his thumb and index finger. He con- siders that the sight of the forceps themselves is responsible for much of the harrowing part of tooth-pulling, and that many nervous persons are greatly shocked by the sight of these instru- ments. The pain is also said to be less. He can take out the most firmly rooted double tooth in a few seconds, and unless the patient expressly desires the employment of instruments he sticks to the use of fingers, which were made before forceps, as well as before forks.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RECENT BRITISH GALES. OVER 160 LIVES LOST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

RECENT BRITISH GALES. OVER 160 LIVES LOST. A complete list of the vessels wrecked and lives lost off the British coasts during the recent gale cannot be given. There are many unknown craft supposed to have perished, and in the cases of many of those vessels known to have gone down it is not accurately known what crew they car- ried. An asterisk denotes the doubtful cases:— Drowned. Saved. H.M.S. Active (Firth of Forth) 19 3     Caister Lifeboat (Caister) 9 3       Quillota (off Wear) 17 5     Schooner unknown (off Wear) 9 —       Amethyst (Berwick) 6 2       Estrup (Berwick) 1 5     Cambois (off Sunderland) 4 —     Harriet (off Wear) 2 2       Europa (off Wear) 3 2     Schooner unknown (off Amble) 6* —...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Bringing Shipwrecked Men Ashore. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Bringing Shipwrecked Men Ashore. In the recent British gales, full particulars of which were given in "The World's News"   last week, a good deal of use was made of the rocket apparatus for bringing shipwrecked men ashore. It may seem incredible, but it is vouched for by several English papers, that in one ship which went to pieces in the gale no one on board knew how to make use of the apparatus, although the British Board of Trade issues full and careful regulations on the subject. Valuable life was lost because of this lack of knowledge.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TOWNS THAT REFUSED RAILWAYS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

TOWNS THAT REFUSED RAILWAYS. It seems strange to us, nowadays, that, not 40   years ago, there were many towns that refused to have anything to do with railways. These towns, says a writer in the "Railway Magazine," have paid dearly for their freedom from what they then deemed "an unwarrantable intrusion on their quietness and respectability." Many in- stances might be given, but a few will suffice. In 1840 Stamford was a town of no little im- portance in the East Midland district. It lay exactly on the track of the Great North-road. Had the original proposal been carried out, there is no doubt that the Lincolnshire town would have been to-day the finest place in its county, and would have had a trade and population such as might well have made it the envy of all other Lincolnshire towns. But the passing of the main line of the railway through Stamford was opposed tooth and nail by some neighboring dignitaries, with the result that the line was kept at a distance of som...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

TOBACCO RINGS.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOMETHING LIKE A FLUKE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

  SOMETHING LIKE A FLUKE.   Writing to the "World of Billiards" (16th   November) a correspondent suggests that a   prize should be given each week to the player   who has made the most outrageous fluke. We   have all perpetrated, or seen, some very big things in this direction, but a fluke vouched for   by the correspondent himself will take a lot of beating. A beginner was playing at a club in   London-street, Southport. The three balls were   close up to the rail on the right-hand side of the   table, the red being about a foot from   the top pocket, the spot-white just above   the middle pocket, and the cue-ball mid-   way between the middle and bottom pockets. The novice played at his opponent's ball without having any special object in view.   This hit the red and sent it into the top &nbsp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SINGULAR DIVORCE STORY. MR. SMITH AND HIS SISTER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

SINGULAR DIVORCE STORY.   MR. SMITH AND HIS SISTER.   The name of Sydney Robert Seth-Smith touches   a chord of my memory (writes our London cor-   respondent on November 15), yet I cannot place   the gentleman. But he was the absent defen-   dant in an undefended divorce suit brought by   his wife, Louise Marie, and heard last Tuesday.   Mrs. Smith pleaded for relief from the matrimo-   nial yoke for the usual reasons, and named Miss   Eleanor Faithfull and a Miss Calrow, as parties   to Smith's major offence. It appeared from coun-   sel's statement that the parties were married in   1884 at Hove, and lived together at Manor Farm,   Guildford, and at Overall, Colne Valley, there   being one child.           In 1893 the petiti...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MOTOR ELECTRIC NOVELTIES. IN NEW YORK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MOTOR ELECTRIC NOVELTIES.   IN NEW YORK. There are several "novelties" in the Automobile   Show in Madison-square Garden, New York.   Probably the lightest electric vehicle, which     is also one of the novelties of the show, is a grace-   ful runabout for town and light country use. It   weighs only 875lb., a distinct revelation to many   who have believed that electric vehicles, as a     rule, weighed more than machines of equal horse   power in gasoline or steam.       This new electric carriage is equipped with the   new Exide battery, consisting of 20 cells, and is     capable of a run of 40 miles on a single charge   at a maximum speed of 14 miles an hour. In   appointments this light roadster is all that could be desired, being finis...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MONSTER BICYCLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A MONSTER BICYCLE.     A trick bicycle rider has invented a new bicycle   upon which he and his sister have already given   a number of per- formances in pub- lic. The gigantic machine has two wheels, of which the driving wheel has a diameter of about 8½ft., while the other, which is in front, is of ordinary size. The framework of the large bi- cycle is so arrang- ed that it sup- ports two seats, one on each side of the wheel. The latter is turned by a double sys- A BICYCLE MADE FOR TWO. tem of driving gear worked by pedals on each side of the large wheel. Each rider is supplied with a steering rod with handle bars, which work in unison with one another. At every revolution the wheel covers a distance of about 25ft. The tyre of the driving wheel, which is said to be the largest in the world, was made to order.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POTATO PLANTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

POTATO PLANTS.   As a result of experiments it is now considered   advisable that the potato plant should be stripped       of its blossoms; by so doing the crop of tubers     will be improved in quantity and be richer in starch. The flower is not at all necessary to the   well-being of the plant, which in the process of blossoming consumes starch and other vegetable substances.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MALICE IN WILLS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MALICE IN WILLS.   For an example of concentrated malice it would be hard, indeed, to beat one which hails from Aston, in the Midlands. An old gentle- man lived there who had made enough to live upon comfortably in his old age. He was in the habit of promising his relatives a place in his will, and among these were two of his sis- ters, to whom he promised to leave £1000 each. He died, and when the will was read it was found that he had kept his word to the letter. He had left to each the sum of £1000, but sub- ject to a life interest, which should go to his wife's sister. She was 28 years of age, while his own two sisters were more than 60. They died without receiving one penny, while the other woman is still living and enjoying the in- come. Almost as cruel, but more deserved, is the in- cident of an old lady who, suddenly coming into an income, met with unexpected hospitality at the hands of her daughter and son-in-law, who from a certain distant coldness warmed into...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ITEMS OF INTEREST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

ITEMS OF INTEREST.   Ireland has 408 able-bodied persons to 1000 inhabitants, Scotland 424, and England 432. Before long there is a probability that Johan- nesburg will become the capital of the Trans- vaal.   Real eider-down is getting dearer, and goose- down is often employed instead for stuffing quilts. Owing to bad weather, it is believed that there will be a great shortage in the world's supply of tea this year. Nearly 4,000,000 pounds of oatmeal were ex- ported from America during the month of Sep- tember. Throughout Africa the cow's horn is a favorite   instrument, being used in connection with others on all festive occasions. The damage to the wheat crop last year by the Hessian fly of the province of Ontario, Can., has been estimated at £400,000. Quebec believes that, with the coming develop- ment of the Canadian Northwest, it is destined to become the great wheat exporting port of the world. The Speaker of the House of Commons receive...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A DIVIDEND OF FOUR MILLIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

  A DIVIDEND OF FOUR MILLIONS.   The dividend of the Standard Oil Company for the year 1901 is at the rate of 48 per cent.   Mr. J. D. Rockefeller, who holds 40 per cent. of   the stock, will receive $19,200,000 (£4,000,000) as his   dividend for the year.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE RED HUNTING COAT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE RED HUNTING COAT. The origin of the red coat is a mystery. There is a story told "that one of the early Henrys was so enamored with the sport of fox-hunting as to ordain it to be a royal sport, and the red coat was worn in consequence." This, however, has been pointed at as absurd, as in those days scarlet was not a royal livery at all. One thing there can be no doubt about, and that is   that the scarlet coat is very popular for those   who hunt regularly. And it must be confessed   that it adds picturesqueness to the scene. The question of color seems to be very much a matter of taste; it is looked upon as an indi- cation of social position. In the abstract, any- one can don the pink, if so desired, but it is considered out of taste for anyone to adopt that color if he does not liberally subscribe to the hunt fund. The black coat is considered to come next in social position, and the ordinary mufti garment for those whose subscription is ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Another New Gun. AN AUSTRALIAN INVENTION. PUBLIC TRIAL OF THE HYLARD MAGAZINE RIFLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Another New Gun.   AN AUSTRALIAN INVENTION. PUBLIC TRIAL OF THE HYLARD MAGAZINE RIFLE.   On the ranges at Staines, England, on November   11, a practical test was made of a new magazine rifle, which was tried against the Lee-Enfield, and showed itself possessed of manifest advan- tages over the weapon at present used in the Service. Among those present at the test were Colonel Bingham, who leaves England on the 14th inst. to assume an important Indian appointment; Colonel Hughes, of the Victorian Artillery, Cap- tain Arkill, of the Victoria Government Office; Mr. Vincent, who represented "The Times" on the Royal Colonial Tour; Mr. Pearse, the "Daily Mail" war correspondent; Mr. McHugh, who re- presented the "Daily Telegraph" in besieged Ladysmith; and a number of other war corre- spondents and experts on military matters. The rifle is the invention of Mr. J. Hylard, a young Australian who is 26 years of age. Mr. Hylard was born at St. Kilda, wh...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MONUMENT TO DE WET. MADE IN GERMANY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A MONUMENT TO DE WET.   MADE IN GERMANY.   On Sunday, November 17, a "De Wet Festival"   was held at Schierstein, on the Rhine, near Wies-   baden, and a statue of the Boer leader then un-   veiled. The funds for this statue have been sub-   scribed mainly by Germans bearing the christian   name of "Christian," and they have come in from   every part of Germany.   A few days before the local committee applied   to Dr. Leyds for information as to De Wet's   health. Dr. Leyds replied that the Boer leader   was in the best health at that moment; that he had handed over to one of his lieutenants the command of his force for some time to come, and that he was then making a tour in order to in- spect the various commandos and their command- ing officers. Seeing that such a great stir is being made throughout Germany (says a corresponde...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN INTERESTING THRONE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

AN INTERESTING THRONE. One of England's disused Coronation thrones. It can be seen at Kingston-on-Thames, and is a very modest seat compared with the gorgeous ivory throne cf the Mogul Emperors. Seven Kings of England were crowned on this throne.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A DE WET STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A DE WET STORY.   "You had better surrender," said the Com- mander of the Forces in the Transvaal, "I've got the whole British army behind me." "Huh! So have I," replied De Wet, and ere   the next five minutes had elapsed his pedometer registered another mile.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NOVELTY IN RESEARCH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

      A NOVELTY IN RESEARCH.   The latest development in France in aerial re- search is the equipment of a scientific expedition to report on such questions as the physiological condition of man while in the air, and the means of curing aerial sickness at high altitudes caused by the rarefaction of the air. These problems interest not only aeronauts, but the proprietors of mountain cures and resorts, and the medical world generally. The prefect of the Seine is to be asked to assist by a subvention the eminent scientists who have conceived this interesting project, and the Paris Gas Company will be ap- proached with a view to their supplying gratis the gas required for the inflation of the balloon.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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