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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AMBASSADORIAL SALARIES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

AMBASSADORIAL SALARIES. Peoplo are apt to think that tho men who are sent to represent their king or country at various foreign capitals are highly paid and envinblo persons. As a matter of fact, unless an ambassador has a private income ho has a pretty hard job to make both ends meet and koep up the position which is necessary. Some countries provide their ambas sadors with an official residence, but frequently a house has to bo rented by tho ambassador—no small it-em. The lowest-salaried ambassadors are tho American representatives; the highost salary of any one of them is £3500, paid to the United States Am bassador in London. The highest sala ries paid to ambassadors aro recoivod by the Austrian Ambassador" tn Lon don and tlie British representative at Paris, each of whom got £9000 n year. The British Ambassadors at Berlin and Vienna aro each paid £8000 a year —a similar salary to that paid by Franco to hor official representatives at London and St. Petersburg. Rus sia pays noar...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IT BELONCED TO HIM. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

IT BELONCED TO HIM. A great sensation was caused the other day at a certain station just previous to tho starting of tho express. Tho guard was about to start tho train when a fussy and fat old gen tleman trotted up to hirn and said: "Wait a minute, will you, please while I " "Impossible, sir/' said the guard, putting tho whistle to his lips. "But you must wait," cried the old gentleman, excitedly. "There's a man's leg under tho wheel!" "Good gracious! Whero is he?" in quired tho horror-stricken guard. "Hold on there!" He hurried after tho old gentleman, wliilo a couplo of porters jumped down on to tho lino umid great excitement. After a short search ono of the porters handed up a rush basket containing a largo leg of mutton. "Thank you/' said tho old gentle man. "What do you mean, sir?" roared tho guard. "You said " "I said a man's leg was under tho wheel, and so it was. I paid for this leg, and if it isn't mine I should like to know whom it belongs to." Then the train moved on.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PEASANT GIRLS WHO SELL THEIR HAIR. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

PEASANT UIHL8 WHO SELL THEIR HAIR. Tho hnir with whioh society women RuppJemont thoir own can scarcely bo termed false, for tho simple reason that it comos from tho heads of other women. Tho most famous lair in tho world is held annually at Limoges, Franco, when tho old-fashioned market place is filled with young peasant : girls, with their long hair trailing in gorgeous waves over their shoulders. However, different countries have different spooialties in hair, and tho agents scour thorn ail in search of suitable tresses. Tho treasured golden hair which women of tho i heat rieal profession ho often covet comes from Germany and .Sweden, while Hungary and Italy semi black tresses to sup plement the scanty locks of the society dame. I Tho buying and selling are conriuctca j chiefly at fairs, although much bar gaining is done privately in tho vil | Iages. The agent or cutter takes up his quarters, and displays a highlv 1 colored handkerchief tied to a walking stick or fastened from one...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STRANGE FUNERAL RITES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

STRANGE FUNERAL RITES. An article in the "Sunday at Home" on the Indians of South Amcrica tells us something* about their funeral rites. The funeral rites, the writer says, are duly observed, and on such occasions great lamentations are made. , Different tribes have their different ccremonies. Some whip themselves and each other, after which' this instrument of torture is com mitted to the grave at the expiration of the appointed time. The dead are buried in a sitting posture, and the body is washed by women, and after this it is kept carefully until nothing is left but the framework, then the bones arc painted. Much depends on the position of the departed in society. A man of rank has his favourite dog always buried with him, a looking-glass is placed on his heart,and his hands arc made to grasp a bow and arrow; the only place such a personage can be buried is in the exact place where he died. The tribes railed Mapuchcs take plates, bread and meat, the hat and ponchn of the departe...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
By Hook or by Crook. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

By Hook or by Crook. Wo often use phrases without know ing their origin. Yet some of those which are often used by lis have their origin in some historic event. Accord ing bo "Notes and Queries," it is so with "By hook or by crook." The destruction caused by tho Fire of Lon don, A.D. 1GGG, during- which some j 15,300 houses, etc., were burnt dot^n, in many cases obliterated all the boun dary marks requisite to determine the*! extent of land, and even the very sites occupied by buildings previous to this terrible visitation. When the rubbish j was removed and tho land' cleared, the j disputes and entangled claims of those houses had been destroyed, both as to tho position and extent of the pro perty, promised not only interminable occupation to the Courts of Law, but made tho far more serious evil of delaying tho rebuilding- of tho city until those disputes wero settled. Im pelled by the necessity of coming- to a speedy settlement to their claims, it was determined that, the, claims ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A MILK STOOL HAVINC A PLACE TO KEEP THE BUCKET CLEAN AND AT THE RICHT HEIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

A MILK STOOL HAVINC A PLAGE TO KEEP THE BUCKET CLEAN AND AT THE RICHT HEIGHT. Tho stool is made of three pieces of board and n pieco of round, or Btake, iron. The appoaranco and mannor of construction aro clearly shown in tbo illustration. Tlic soat board is sawed out to fit tlio pircumforcnco of the bucket to be used, and tlio iron is also bent to this curve and fastened to the board as shown. The buckot shelf on tlio front support holds tho bucket at tlio right height, and keeps it clean and out of tho way of tho cow's feot while milking.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO AVOID SLEEPLESS NIGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

HOW TO AVOID SLEEPLESS MIGHTS. Sloop is a habit. It is u very na tural aud bonulicial habit, but ono that can bo oasily broken through injudici uiib living and thinking. Poor sleep ers arc usually high-strung, nervous people, who have loo active bodies or bruins, or both, and who aro ambitious and inclined to neglect themselves. Insomnia cannot bo cured by drugs. It is always clangorous to use drugs to produce sleep, and tlioy should sol doni bo resorted to except in. aori'ous illness, and then only on the advico of a physician. If you" cannot sloop, and iind that your sleeplessness is bocoiuing a habit, begin immediately to go slowor. Oarb your ambition, leavo olf all unneceft sary work and learn how to rest. Your body and your brain need roposo and rest, but the trouble with the people who "cannot sleep" is, they do not know how to rest. Thoy do not atop thinking, planning, worrying, and go to bod with active brains and only partly relaxed bodies and then worry because sleop does ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RICHT WAY TO BECIN THE DAY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

RICHT WAV TO BECIN THE DAY. There i« a right way ami a wrong way to bogin tho (lay, ami tho method you choose may haw a decided cfJ'oct upon Mio success ur failure yon will achieve during your waking hours. Try to plan your activities hh far as you can tho night hoforo. Five minutes of calm looking ahead in the early evening will go a long way towards lessening tho burdens of tho morrow. This done, take a hath, not too warm nor too cold, antl bo careful not to re main in tho water. Tin's nightly bath, followed by eight hours sleep in a well-ventilatod room, is the host pre paration one can have for a .successful day. When your alarm clock arouses you, or, better still, tho morning- ami— don't jump out. of bed and rush into your clothes as if tho houso wcro afire* Hurry in tho oarly morning intorforcB with your heart action and your cir culation and irritates your norvo cen tres. By going alow for tho first few minutes you will bo ablo to do more j and bettor work throughout tho day....

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
METAPHYSICAL VIEW OF LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

METAPHYSICAL VIEW OF LIFE. Wliat is life? Dr. I*eendre of the Paris Museum of Natural History has proposed a now scientific definition of the term. It lias been proved that the parts of a body can live for hours separately after tho body as a whole is dead. Hence it follows, he says, that life must be something which co ordinates functions that may continue after it has itself vanished. In other words We have hero a scien tific recognition of tho soul or spirit, as something apart from and in'addi I tion to the more physical elements of j the body, which may live after tho soul has departed. But the lower animals possess life, though most people do not graftt them a soul. Ac cording to this doctrine the lower ani mals, as well as man, would have to have a soul or spirit—an impalpable .something which holds the parts of the physical being together and makes them an entity.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TEA-DRINKINC IN PARACUAY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

TEA-DRINKINC IN PARACUAY. Tho natives of Paraguay, in drinking their tea, do not pour it from a tea pot into a cup, as Europeans aro ac customed to drink tea, hut fill a goblet with tho beverage, and then .suck it up through' a long ornamental tube. The former is generally made out of a pumpkin or gourd, while tho tube is a long reed, but with the upper classes it is often mado of solid silver. Both, reed and gourd aro richly carved. Tho natives say that this tea is an excel lent remedy for fever and rheumatism, and chomieul tests which have been rnado by German physicians seem to show that there is good ground for this statement. Certain it is that tho tea is widely used throughout Para guay in eases of illness, and that, so far as has been observed, the elfocts produced by it are highly beneficial. The place'Tlonours not the man, 'tis the man who gives honour to the place.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
JUST PUNISHMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

JUST PUNISHMENT. After an hour's hard bargaining and prevarication, the musical-instrument dealer succeeded in disposing of tlvo cheap old cornet, which ho had had in stock for years, at four times its pro per value. "And where may I have the pleasure of sending it?" ho inquired ingratiat ingly, now that the customer at last had given in. "To No. 999, Fig Street," came the reply. "ATy Hat-- is on til© third floor.*' Tho tradesman's brow darkened; his jaw fell perceptibly. And why? Be cause only on the preceding day he, his wifo and family, had taken possession of tho flat on tho second floor of No. 999, Fig Street, on a three years' agreement. '

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRACTICAL ILLUSTRATION. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

PRACTICAL ILLUSTRATION. Shamus O'Reilly had just been in troduced, for the first time in his life, to a circular saw, and the foreman of the sawmills after giving him the ne cessary orders, left Shamus to his work. Shamus was vastly interested in the buzzing blade, and, his curiosity get ting the better of him, soon found him self minus a finger. As he sat disconsolately mopping the blood from his hand, the foreman re-appeared. "Hallo, my man, whats up with you?" he cried. "What's up wid me, is it? Am not I after losin' a finger?" replied Sham us, in great, and excusable, indigna tion. The foreman frowned. He was think ing of the Employers' Liability Act. "And how on earth did you manage that?" he asked, angrily. Shamus shook his head. "Sure, and 1 don't know! I just touched the blessed thing like this wid my finger Be jabbers, there's an other one gone!"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TROUBLE AT THE TOWER. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

TROUBLE AT THE TOWER. She was a good servant, was Jen-. | nie, and Mrs\ Wanderfarr never wish | od for tatter. But in the matter of ' pictures Jennie was weak. There was one in particular, which showed the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Every day Mrs. W. hung it straight, aiul ove^y morning Jennie put it crooked So Mrs. W. watched, "Now, look here, Jennie," she said, 4'you've hung that picture of the tower (•rooked again! Just look at it!" "That's just what I say, mum," re turned the domestic dolefully. "Look at it! Tho only way you can get that silly tower to hang straight is to hang the picture orookedl"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCIENCE NOTES & NEWS. SUBSTITUTE FOR A GLASS OUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

SC IE NCE NOTES & NEWS. SUBSTITUTE FOR A 0LA6S OU'l'Mt. It sometimes happens that when one has U> cut ghisa a glass cutter is not at, liuud, or tiio ono in use is warn out. The following will timko a good substitute. Take an old lilc, break the ond mid it will bo found that one cor ner will generally have a very sharp edge, which will cut glass quite as well as any cutter. Of course, it boon wears down, hut it is merely necess ary to break a small piece oil' the file again and it will be as .sharp as be foro.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN VAPOUR IS DRY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

WHEN VAPOTJR IS DRY. A popular misconception is the sup position that aqueous vapour and ice are wot. They are in themselves dry, and become wot only when they turn to water. So dry is aqueous vapour that it will dry any moist objects that it eoinos in contact with. Superheated abeam, boforo it condenses, is a dry gas. Ice fools wot if the temporaturo of tho hand is sufficient to melt it; as ice it is dry. Another misconception is that the air can bo either moist or dry. It is oondensed aqueous vapour in the air that is moist, and it would be moist if there wore no air. A given quantity of aqueous vapor eonfined-in a given space will bo wet or dry ac cording to the temperature. At thirty two degrees for instance, it might be partially condensed, and consequently wot, while at seventy degrees, owing to expansion, it would be dry.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DOWN IN THE DEPTHS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

DOWN IN THE DEPTHS. No. wonder the sea is so salt I Do you know that if the common salt were extracted from the various, oceans of the earth, it would form a masB about five times the size of the Alps? At any rate, it is estimated at 3,051,342 cubic miles. It cannot, of course, be said for certain that we yet know the greatest depth of the sea. But Sir J4mes Ross once took soundings nine hundred miles to the westward of St. Helena, and found the depth to be just under six miles! And the pressure of the water at only eleven hundred yards is equal to fifteen thousand pounds to the square inch. Altogether, there are about one hundred and forty-seven millTon square miles of water on the earth of forty nine and a half million square of land.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW SOME PARTS OF THE WORLD CET THEIR NAMES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

HOW SOME PARTS OF THE WORLP CET THEIR NAMES. Afciir, Mio oldest continent, known to tnim, get« ito nutno from the Sanskrit work "U«hu«," inclining "land of tho dawn." Europo is derived from tho Greek words meaning "tho broad fueo of tho earth'.'' Some scholars, however, beliovo that tho namo conies from (Ito Hebrew word meaning 'Mho land <»f i tho sotting sun." Tho ancient people of tho oast know little of Kuropo, savo that it was the land where tho sun set, «o they have called it "The land of Hip sotting sun.11 Algiers is n newer spelling of tho Arabic natno uAl . fozuir,M meaning "the peninsula:." Arabia, which atands for "Arab-iu," means "men of tho de«ert." Austria is tho modoru form of tho name given to that count 17 by Clmrlesinagno, "Oesterrcieh," which mount "Eastern Kingdom," so-called to distinguish it from Charlesinagno's • ompiro in westorn Europe. China, tlio niuno wo give to a great empire in tho Far East, is not tho nanio used by tho pooplo of Dint country....

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FIRST LILY OF THE VALLEY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

THE FIRST LILY OF THE VALLEY. Ouco upon a timo, bo long ago that no 0110 in Germany had any lily of tho valley, thoro lived an abbot who was a great gardcuor and a good man. A pilgrim passing through his district was kindly received by him, and in gratitude gave him a withored-looking root that ho said ho had brought from a country where similar roots boro lovely Kcented ilowers. Tho abbot planted it and watched it, as ho watch ed all tho things in his garden. In tho spring it Kent up a few broad, shining leaves, but no flowers. Ho left it alone, and next year it sonb up some moro leaves and a fow lilies of tho valley, tho first that had over grown in Ger many. By tho third year tho fame of tho plant had travelled hero and th'ero, bo that people who loved Ihoir gardons camo to tb~ abbey on purposo to sco tho plant Kvory year there was a bigger bed of lilies of tho valley and a longer procession of visitors to soo thorn, and the abbot was filled with prido and vain glory, because he,...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THEN SHE TOLD HIM. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

THEN SHE TOLD HIM. -Miss Krab—as her name, perhaps, might load one to supposo—was a maiden lady of uncertain ago; and, poor woman, liko many of her kind, not yet had she realised that her daj-s of blushing coyness now wore passed. In fact, sho still cherished the fond il lusion that years had left her beauty unimpaired, and that, in duo course, some gay cavalier would come to claim her hand. Then one day, instead of the gay cavalier, came tlio census officer to make inquiry of those very subjects which wero forbidden. Miss Krab was groat ly Wroth. "Hnv<» you seen tho girls next door," sho asked—"tho Hill twins?" "Yes," replied the census man. "And thoy told mo their ages without a murmur." ''Oh! Then I'm just as old as they are/" snapped Aliss Krab. A 6railc played round tho mouth of tho census officer. Then he took out a notebook and wrote: "Miss Krab, spinster, as old as tho hills."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUPERFLUOUS TEACHING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 17 January 1914

SUPERFLUOUS TEACHING. Thoro lio sat—on a gato by tho road side, swinging his leys and gazing earn estly at tho telegraph wires. l'"or a long while tho bcnovolont old gentleman watched hiin, thinking tho man to be some ignorant yokel. Then ho laughed softly to liiinsolf and moved towards the gato. "Waiting to see a mossago pass?" ho asked. Tho man grinned, and nodded his head as though in assent. Whereupon tho benevolent old gontloman scrambled to a porch on tho gato, and for tho next quarter of an hour tried hard to dispel his companion's ignorance. "Now," ho said at lust, "you havo a storo of frosh knowledge to take back with you to tho farm." "Farm?" asked tho man. "What farm?" "Why, tlw farm you work on, of course." "But I don't work on a farm. _ Mo and my mates," said the man, "are telegraph linesmon, testing a new wirol"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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