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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,306 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. GROUND has been broken at last for the new buildings, and before another year is passed they will probably be well nigh finished. There will be about three month's blasting work to be done first, and then the foundation can be laid. The trustees have so altered the plans that we are unable to give them in this number. The towers have been rejected, and the edifice will therefore be more like the new School of Mines building than the architect anticipated. The opening of. the Rapid Transit Railway will also prove to be a boon to those of our students who live in Brooklyn and New Jersey, giving them easier access to the College and saving at least one wasted hour per day. All signs point to a most successful term next year, perhaps even more so than the year just ended. Let us hope that the indications will not prove to be fallacious, and our College may, with a new home and increased facilities for study, have before it a future which shall completely eclipse the past...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
COMMENCEMENT, '78. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

COMMENCEMENT, '78. THE 124 th Annual Commencement of Columbia, was held at the Academy of Music on the morning of June 12th, and was in every respect a decided success. The day was fine and the attendance excellent. Professor Drisler presided, and on the stage were the Hon. Hamilton Fish, ex-Secretary of State and President of the Board of Trustees ; Messrs. G. M. Ogden, S. P. Nash, Rev. Dr. Morgan Dix, A. E. Vanderpoel, F. W. Schermerhorn and C. A. Silliman, of the Trustees ; Dr. Seymour, Bishop of Springfield, Dr. Howland, Rev. Dr. Morgan, Stewart L. Woodford, Dr. Ormiston, and many others, besides the faculty of the College. Neyer's orchestra played an overture and a march, after which Dr. Duffie read a prayer. The speeches consisted of a Greek poem by Mr. C. F. Hurlburt, and a Latin poem by Mr. Morna) Williams, and orations by W. P. Allen on "The Vagaries of Science," F. S. Bangs on " Public Duty," S. B. Newberry on "The Special Value of Technical Education in Ameo rica," and W....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SPECTATOR DINNER. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

SPECTATOR DINNER. THE first dinner to commemorate the successful close of a year's editorial work took place at the "Wellington" on Friday evening, June 7th. The smiling faces of the New Board were a striking contrast to the grave dignity of the Old Board. At one end of the table sat the Editor-in-chief lor the past year, Mr. Holls, while at the other, and half enveloped in flowers, sat the President of the Association, Mr. Crow. The other noble editors were grouped around at intervals of three feet. After partaking of the sumptuous Menu from Little Neck clams to Gateaux, the company proceeded to the address and toasts, as follows : Address of Editor-in-Chief , - F. W. HOLLS. " Ye call me chief, and ye do well to call him chief, who — has fought every shape of man or beast." TOASTS. 1. Our Paper , - - - - C. H. CROW. " Why did I write ? What sin to me unknown Dipped me in ink, —my parents ; or my own ? As yet a child, nor yet a fool to fame, I lisped in numbers , for the numbers cam...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
PHILOSOPHY OF FLUNKS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

PHILOSOPHY OF FLUNKS. r ~pHERE can be no doubt that a flunk has a very -E different aspect when we view it in a philosophic light, than it has when we contemplate it from any othei standpoint. While geologically or astronomically we may treat a flunk as a very insignificant thing, philosophically, we should be sadly wanting in the commonest sense were we to attach to it, consequences other than those of the gravest importance. In order to illustrate this point, I will beg your indulgence while I relate a little dream I had a few nights since, which I hope is not without a direct bearing on the subject under discussion. I thought that from a slight elevation I looked down upon a great plain extending on all sides to the farthest limits of the horizon. This I thought was the kingdom of knowledge, and the two ruling princes were Prince Max and Prince Zero, the dominion of the former stretching to the right, the latter holding sway over the country on the left. These two princes, I was ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE DELIGHTS OF TROUT-FISHING. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

THE DELIGHTS OF TROUT-FISHING. THOSE who have never spent their summer months in trying to catch the finest fresh-water fish we have, will not be able to appreciate the following, but it may serve, perhaps, to induce them to start off, this year, for the first time to enjoy the pleasures of the sport. First ot all, you must get up about four o'clock in the morning, as old fishermen tell you that trout bite better early in the day; and, as you are generally somewhat behind hand in rising, you make up for it, taking only a mouthful or two, and scald your throat pretty thoroughly with the coffee in your efforts to hurry, if the fish are educated you make use of flies, but in some wild regions they are so poorly instructed in what is good that it is necessary to dig worms, and entice them with these. In such parts of the country it is usual tor the boy of whom you inquire the way to mumble so that you can not understand what he says, and, on asking what he has in his mouth, he replies, ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE GOODWOOD MAN. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

THE GOODWOOD MAN. EXPERIENCE shows that there are no depths of baseness yet attained by the human race, but that men have been willing to descend still lower. However it is generally conceded that the Goodwood man has at last touched bottom. The deep, dark treachery for which this unhappy individual is noted will forever descend a mystery to posterity, the black turpitude of his character is too dense for the lactometer of even Chandler to determine, the laws of Mariotte and Gay Lussac are powerless when confronted with the sp. gr. of his baseness. He is in short a " monstrum nulla virtute redemfttum." No sooner does he enter the classic shades of our " ruined pile," than he - begins to weave the meshes of his wily plots about his unsuspicious classmates, he makes and breaks coalition treaties with Society men, he fawns upon the neutrals, and sugars his way into their good graces. Oh, an altogether slippery fellow is this most popular man ! How happy ought that class to be which has...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE GRIND. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

THE GRIND. THAT particular species of the genus student, which is called " grind," is somewhat rare. Two or three specimens, however, are always found in each class of every college. The grind is supposed to do nothing but eat, drink water, or perhaps tea and coffee, and study. He need not necessarily be bright, or learn with great facility, but on the contrary, he is often dull and stupid. If the former, he generally attains a high standing on the roll of honor ; if the latter, he is more often nearer the foot than the head of his class. His object in grinding, as it is called, may be supposed to be that of obtaining the best education which his college can afford, and of accumulating marks according to that wise, just, and beneficent, (?) marking system, at present in vogue in most of our colleges. Let us examine the prominent characteristics, both physical and mental, of the grind. Behold him ! how easily he can be discerned among his fellow-students. Pallid face, sore eyes, and ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
BOATING. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

BOATING. IN the Harlem Regatta, which is to take place on the 22d inst., we will be represented in the fouroared gig race only. The crew which will carry our fortunes on that day is composed as follows : R. T. P. Fiske, 'Bl, S. of M bow J. H. Montgomery, 'Bl 2 W. Forster, 'Bl 3 W. B. Parsons, Jr., '79 stroke H. Coghill, 'BO cox. A. H. Van Sinderen, 'Bl substitute When the entries closed, on the 12th, there was no boat in against ours, so the Executive Committee decided to reopen the entries until Friday the 14th, at 3 o'clock. The races will begin at 2 o'clock, and will be rowed up to McComb's Dam. Any students, or their friends, wishing tickets for the barge, are requested to apply to Messrs. Bangs or Erhard, price 50 cents. The barge will be anchored at the finish. There will be only one steamer following the race boats, and she is reserved for the referee, judges and press.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CLASS SUPPER OF '81. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

CLASS SUPPER OF '81. COMMITTEE. JOSEPH O. CRANE, HENRY T. PECK, HENRY T. SMITH. TOASTS. 1. Eighty-one. '' O fortes pejoraque passi Mecum saepe viri, nunc vino pellite curas." —[Horace.] Response by Mr. Demorest. 2. The Faculty. " Of them we say (combining our conceptions), God bless them all, —perhaps with some exceptions."—[Anon.] Response by Mr. PATTEN. 3. The Snab. " And wingless angels still appear On earth man's lonely lot to cheer." —[Carnes.] Response by Mr. MORAN. 4. Our Crew. " dacpvif f-isS 1 cciiiXXavA Response by Mr. FORSTER. 5. Our Eleven. " Palma non sine pulvere." Response by Mr. CRANE. 6. Our Nine. " Qui vivra, verra." Response by Mr. ROSE. 7. The Circus. " A pleasing land of drowsy rest it was, Of dreams that wave before the half-shut eye."—[Thompson.] Response by Mr. H. SMITH. 8. The Pony. " Blest guide of youth ! from thy forbidden page We glean our lore and shun tutorial rage."—[Anon.] Response by Mr. MONTGOMERY. 9. Sturm's Theorem. " Black it stood as night, Wri...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst: — The Senior class supper will take place at the Masassoit House in Springfield. The Eastern trip of the glee club was a very pleasant as well as successful one. — Student. A new stock of chemicals and apparatus has been received from Germany for the Laboratory. The Sophomores are to have their class supper on the evening of June 21, at the Crocker House in New London. Amherst vs. Lowell, May 22d ; Amherst 2 to Lowell 3. Amherst vs. Clippers, May 29th; Amherst 7to Clippers 1. Amherst vs. Williams, June Ist ; Amherst 9 to Williams 3. Bowdoin: — The nine defeated the Portland Reds by a score of 15 to 6. The Sophomores who contend for the Greek and Latin prizes, at the close of the term, will be volunteers. The examination will be on the work of the last two terms. The first Field Day for two years occurred at the Topsham Fair Grounds, June 1. The following record was made: X Mile Walk, 3 m. 51 sec. Throwing the Base-Ball, 310 ft. 1 in. Putting the Shot (32 ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. THE following article on " College Morality " cut from the Hamilton Lit., gives a very good picture of the situation of the many colleges within the past year: " Now is the golden opportunity for reformers. Revivals are out of season, temperance is well under way, and time would soon have begun to hang heavy on the hands of these noble benefactors of humanity ; but, fortunately, they seem to have discovered a new field of operations. All at once they are convinced that the colleges of the land need reforming. The newspapers teem with articles on college discipline, college morals and kindred subjects. Evidently these persons who so generously contribute the above specified articles, have for some time past been in constant attendance at old ladies' tea parties and church-sewing-circles—-the inevitable source of amusement of certain college towns. In some of these fruitful nurseries of gossip and scandal they have heard described the loathsome immorality of students in...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. NEW York music lovers have, this season, a very great treat before them. Mr. Theodore Thomas and his unrivalled orchestra are giving and will daily give concerts in Gilmore's Garden till the end of the summer. Accordingly going to the country this year will cost more of a resolution than ever before, for on no other occasion could the educated classes of the city hear so much and so classical music lor so trilling a sum. Mr. E. G. Gilmore has leased the Garden and has had it fitted out in the best style, so that it looks rather like a scene from fairy-land than like the old site of the dog show. Our own public, students and their friends need no inducements to go to these concerts. They have attended regularly since the opening night, and cannot but be pleased and delighted. To those, however, who have not yet been there we give the advise to go this very evening and no regret will be felt for doing so. Thursday nights are devoted to symphonic and classical piec...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 June 1878

SHAVINGS. IN post-office. Colored lady —" Washington, D. C. What does D. C. stand for?" Colored gent — " Daddy of his Country I s'pose." — Amherst Student. THE Turkish method of mowing grass with a scythe was finely exhibited the other day by a Freshman, who had taken the contract of mowing the ball-ground on the campus. What the price was we know not, but believe the scythe was borrowed. After sharpening the silver-steel blade, he struck in at the rate of a foot-and-a-half cut, broadside on. A few vigorous strokes so fearfully gouged the grass and wrenched his arms that he came to the conclusion that the ball-ground was covered with small Indian mounds. After resting himself twenty-five minutes, he pulled the blade out of the earth only to look upon something in the shape of a half barrel-hoop. Long time he reflected, then fell upon it with two feet and a knee, tugged and twisted until he thought it looked like a scythe-blade, then muttered : " There, I'll take it back now. It is a...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, JULY ist, 1878. No. 19. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief, CHARLES H. CROW, '7B, Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B- J- FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. H. G. PAINE, '79- W - B - PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - - 1 5 cts. Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. VACATION with its pleasures has come once more, and that it will prove to be a most pleasant and enjoyable time for all our readers is our confident hope. It would be superfluous to give any hints about the best way of spending the time, all of us have, no doubt, already made our plans, and hope that they will prove acceptable. But, we cannot forbear calling the attention of our readers to the remarks of John Ruskin in his recent lecture before the Oxford students, in which he says about vacation : " Cultivate all your personal powers, not competitively, but patiently and usefully. You have no business to read in the long vacation. Come here to make scholars of yourselves, and go to the mountains or the sea to make men of yourselves. Give at least a month in each year to rough sailors' work and sea fishing. Don't lounge and flirt on the beach, but make yourselves good seamen Then, on the mountains, go and help the shepherd at his work, the woodmen at theirs, and lear...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Valedictory. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

Valedictory. THE first and most difficult year of THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR is over, and nothing remains for those who have conducted it hitherto, but to make their bow and hand over the paper and all that belongs to it, to their successors, with the firm hope that the future will be even more successful than the past. Begun with many misgivings, possessing in the Acta Columbiana a then powerful rival, frowned upon by one-half of the College, our paper has, we may say it without the least ostentation, forced a way for itself, and made itself a self-supporting, permanent institution of Columbia College. Financially its success has been signal, though the expense attending the publication of a volume of 246 pages of reading matter, and 170 pages of advertisements was by no means small. The subscription list has increased steadily, and the list of our advertisers includes the very best names of the city and no others. The rivalry of our " sister organ," once an important factor in our cal...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE EYES, AND THEIR CARE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

THE EYES, AND THEIR CARE. DURING the last few years the increase of sore and weak eyes in certain districts of the Eastern States has been most alarming. In some places eye troubles have been called an " epidemic," and in others they have been ascribed to that mysterious, but insinuating, ghost, Malaria. It appears to me that if people would take care of their general health and stop reading fine printed novels far into the midnight hours, and if students would cease studying for scholarships when they have only sufficient health to make lite endurable at most, we should hear fewer complaints of terrible aches in the eyes, near-sightedness, conjunctivitis, granulated eye-lids, &c. It may be well to discuss the causes of diseased eyes more fully, A century ago our forefathers, as a rule, were healthier, stronger men. They read less—there was less to read. The majority of them spent a large portion of their time in gardening and agricultural pursuits. No one will deny that...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR COLLEGE CUSTOMS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

OUR COLLEGE CUSTOMS. AFTER a careful consideration, and conference with members of colleges which have a class dinner instead of class day, I would recommend the restoration of class-day at Columbia, if there is anything like fellowship in a class, and if an orator and poet, who would not " give the college away," can possibly be selected. A class-dinner for '7B was inevitable. Coalitions and societies had previously, perhaps three years before, selected their men for orator and poet, and the majority, for the sake of peace, selected a Dinner. I voted to have a dinner, and was present, but it now seems to me that the selfish seclusion, nay injury of "stuffing" only a graduating class, and perhaps with too much wine, as in many colleges, detracts from, and cannot add to the welfare of Alma Mater. A class-day of a neighboring college, and one, too, not noted for its rank, has turned me towards the " day." The exercises were conducted before large crowds of friends, ladies, and visitor...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
RULES FOR WRITING ON COLLEGE RANK.* [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

RULES FOR WRITING ON COLLEGE RANK.* HOW TO MAKE AN ELEGANT AND IMPARTIAL ARTICLE. Dear Friend : i . TF by hook or by crook you have gained high marks, -1 you will invariably praise high rank in colleges. Explain the advantages to business men in employing men already famous. Prove that the weaker constitution a man has the more apt he is to succeed, &c. 2. If you are a low stand man you will have no difficulty in proving that honor men are a " gang of fools " destined to die before their proper time, and that they are likely to become drunkards because Porson was one. Porson was an honor man, Porson was a drunkard ; therefore honor men are drunkards. 3. If you are a school teacher, praise that noble calling ; and show that men alone of your stamp are truly great and virtuous. 4. Prove that handsome men are more apt to succeed and become distinguished than homely men. 5. If you are an honor man do not select arguments that would disgrace any country preacher who has never...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 July 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. LOOK over the Index to the last volume of our paper and see what a vast amount of reading matter is offered to our subscribers. Besides, the price is only Two Dollars, but remember, you must pay the cash down if you want to receive the paper. VACATION once more. PROF. BURGESS and wife sail in July. MIKE is alone in his glory at College now. " WHERE, oh where is the once green campus ? ' THE managing editor of this paper for next year will be elected in September. THE blasting for the new building has begun, and will be finished in October. THE final examinations were severe but very successful. Very few " flunks " or conditions. '7B is the second class in many years which has graduated without one sp. gr. '74 had the like honor before. DON'T forget to bring up your two dollars for next year's paper on the first day. It saves us trouble and you much annoyance. THE Columbiads still wait for purchasers. We hope they will readily be disposed of in the fall. MR. E. W. HOPK...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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