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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 61 many other such homes, one of which deserves particular mention for the reason that it forms the nucleus of many such homes. We refer to Holy Providence House at Cornwells, a home connected with the mother house of M. M. Katharine's Order of the Blessed Sacrament for tho Indian and Colored Races, founded February 12, 1891. This home accommodates about two hundred children, three-fourths of whom are girls. Here they are taught reading, writing, penmanship, compo sition, spelling, language, arithmetic, elements of United States history and geography, while particular attention is given to cathechism. Bible history and religious instruction. A complete course of sewing is given, housekeeping in its every branch is taught, and a training in the steam laundry is given to the older girls. Singing is taught and instrumental music lessons are given to A FEW WHO DISPLAY ABILITY. The boys hero are taught farming and shoemaking, but after 12 they are sent to Balmeade, w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

fZ mwq 0 TiZ" INDIAN ADVOCATE. vwff IV" '"Wpv W& the vocation for many. If only tho poor souls many of whom are darker in mind than body having been taken in tho bosom of mother Church, will persevere in its teachings, then on that last day will they be seen with their brethren, we "have fought the good fight and kept the faith." Catholic American. . 'tr REV. PETER J. DE SMET. A .SKETCH Or HIS MPE AND CHAKACTEIt. Thirty years ago the names of few, if any, of our Catholic priests were better known to the people of the coun try than the name of Rev. Peter J. De Smet, S J., the celebrated Indian missionary. Indeed it may be said, his name and his fame were co-exten-osive with the civilized world. Father De Smet was a native of Belgium. He came to this country when young and was one of the early yr Jesuits of the Jesuit Missouri prov- nce. As-near as we can guess, he was ordained priest either some time in the i . . ... late twenties G-p-i-n-the-early --thirties. When still a young ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 63 dition to our state room. I saw that ho was far worse than myself, and with as, little delay as possible I adminis tered to him the last sacraments. Now said I, Father prepare mo, and then I knelt down by his bedside, took his hands into mine, and made my con fession. As he said nothing when I had got through, I looked at him and saw his eyes fixed in death. Ho had died without having given me absolu tion; but it seems that my hour was not yet come, for in a short time I was on the way to recovery. Once I was giving an instruction to a number of Indians. I spoke in English and a half breed Canadian translated me into Indian. When I had got through, a big Indian chief spoke up, and said: "Father that man has not translated you right." I turned in surprise to the Indian and snid: "Why, do you speak English?" "I do indeed," he answered. "And where did you learn English?" "I learned it in Ireland."" "In Ireland, what took you to Ireland?" "Why I was born there, I...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

64. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Louis, preached the funeral sermon. Eloquent as Bishop Ryan was on all occasions, we can readily suppose that on the occasion of which we speak he surpassed even himself, since his sub ject was the good, the charitable, the devoted Peter J. Do Smet. Kansas City Catholic. THE TWENTY-FOUR PRESIDENTS. Washington first of the presidents stands, Next placid John Adams attention commands, Tom Jeflerson's third on the glorious score And square Jimmy Madison counts number four. Fifth on the record is plain James Monroe, And John Quincy Adams is sixth, don't you know. Next Jackson and Martin Van Buren, true blue, And Harrison ninth, known as Tippecanoe. Next Tyler, the first of the Vices to rise, Then Polk and then Taylor, tho second who dies ; Next Fillmore, a Vice, takes the President's place, And small Franklin Pierce is fourteenth in the race. Fifteenth is Buchanan, and following him The great name of Lincoln makes all others dim ; Next to Johnson comes Grant, wi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. istic. Ho struck terror here ono day, fifty miles away the next, unci 30 on, till the people said "he traveled like a whirlwind." That is how he got the name he bore until his death, although it was not his right name. Whirlwind was not a blood-thirsty man. Colonel William Matthowson, of Wichita, knew him for over forty years. He says that he was as true as steel to a friend, white or red. When Mr. Mat thewson wanted once to trade with the Oomanches, who wore tlun a very savage as well as a very treacherous tribe, Whirlwind called thirty braves to his side and volunteered to accompany the noted plainsman. When they went into the Comanche camp the warriors and people of that nation proposed to take Mr. Matthewson's goods by force. Whirlwind stepped in front of the Com anche chief and, pointing one ringer at Mr. Matthewson and the other one at the nose of the chief, said: "That white man is the friend and brother of the Cheyenne, and you cannot lay a linger on his...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

"vw " "wsw ' 66 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. child of busy parents, attending a pub lic school, and depending on a Sunday school for his religious instruction, has a very poor chance of knowing any thing about the teachings of the Church. And the worst of it is, .he will never know how ignorant he is. There are many such boys, grown up, in the lodges of the Free Masons and Odd Fellows who plead ignorance of the commands of the Church. Next to the school, there is an im portant factor in guiding young people, which ought to be more considered than it is. This is the parochial or family library. Teach the children. to read good books by example. There are many instructive and interesting books in the catalogues of the Catholic pub lishers. Every family ought to have a few. Usually, the Catholic library is limited to a big gilt Bible and a "Life" bought on the fatal installment plan, whose agents have caused many to lose faith in Catholic literature. No family can afford to be without some goo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 67 Ah! if nature, sometimes too much oppressed, murmurs and grumbles, he can say to it BK SILENT, I AM NOT MORE THAN A GOD. Let me hasten like Him to seek com fort in the bosom of my Heavenly Father, and lean tranquilly on His all powerful arm; for if Jesus deigned to ennoble the workman, by making of Himself a workman, he will know how, whpn it is necessary, to come to the help of the glorified companions of His toil.' Unfortunately we no longer hear such language as this from the laborer. The christian spirit has van ished in the revolutionary that over whelmed the religious corporations, in which the remembrance of Nazareth overshadowed the humblest trades, in which the laborer, fortified by esprit de corps, protected by laws that regu lated his wages and his labor, respected by society, learned to respect himself, and to be content with his likeness to a God. Since then the laborer, with out traditions and without support, has become the prey of pitiless rap...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

68 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. AHERICA'S REAL DANGER. It is not very often the Protestants of America have the truth presented to them in the outspoken manner that characterizes an article by M. N. Butler in the Christian Cynosure. Mr. Butler, a born citizen of the United States, with Protestant parentage, shows that America's real danger is not from Catholicity, as the A. P. A. orator pro claims, but from misguided Protestant ism, He asks if the 50,000,000 of Protestants in this country should not do a big job of house cleaning at home before jumping on the 10,000,000 of Catholics. The secret society, Mr. Butler tells us, "rules American Pretestantism with a rod of iron." He points out how the Protestants, who fairly raye about Catholic priests and the reverence their parishioners have for them, bow down to their "high priests" and "most excellent grand high priests." Protes tants are horror struck at the venera tion and supreme loyalty of Catholics to the Pope, yet the' and their minis t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. GO B D ALPHABET OF SAINTS. 1IY M. C IIONAN. for St. Anthony, seraph of love, To whom little Jesus came down from above, for St. Basil, the great Doctor, true friend, Before his blest relic with rev'rence I bend, for St. Celcstinc, glad to define That Mary was truly God's Mother divine, for St. Denis, his head in his hand, 'Tis faith makoth easy what God may command, for Elizabeth, whose prayer we are told Changed gold into roses and roses to gold, is for Francis of Borgia, a saint From seeing a corpse with its foul loathsomo taint, for Germanus, the Saint of Auxerre, With whom blest St. Patrick lived many a year for St Hubert, who hearing God's word Rose quickly and heeded the voice that he heard, for St. Isidore, ploughman of Spain, Now " placed among princes" for ever to reign, for St. John, "of the Golden Mouth" named, For charity, learning, and eloquence famed, for St. Kenelm. King he was born, Martyr he died, hidden under a thorn, for St. Luke, Acts and Gos...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

ben 70 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. question, "Shall Jackson have our homes, shall wo move westward at his command?" Monroe had sent his messenger, Andrew Jackson, to request a peaceful removal, beyond the Mississippi, to the newly formed Indian Territory. Deep ly unwilling were tho Choctaws to sur render home and dear associations. The fourteenth day had thus drawn to a close, and yet the question remained unanswered. The excitement was intense but there was not outward manifestation. It was known that Pushmatahaw would give his decision just as tho moon overtopped tho trees and flooded the valley with her bril liancy. Silent as spectres stood the Choctaw warriors; the slow regular breathing of the many men sounded terribly distinct in the still air. Suddenly every eye was directed to the chief. The council fire flickered in the moonlight casting a wierd unearthly shadow on the cold, passionless visages of the royal circle. A wave of sudden chill passed over the heart of many a brave unkno...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

-rrm?m$ -qn hwst - - mmmmmmmmmmtmgm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 71 "and to my loved Tallula, ah, Tallula, why did you leave me?" With ironical smile he looked on the passion contorted countenance of Jack son. Deeply did the artful Jackson ponder over his reply. "Pushmatahaw, it is the boast of your line, that death was ever esteemed an honor for your people. Are you loss generous than your forefathers? Will you lot it be said by the remnant war would leave, 'Pushmatahaw sacri ficed us to his pride?' Consider well your final answer. I offer certain death or a chance of life across the Missis sippi! I swear, you know my oath, to have the land if strewn with corpses." Convulsively twitched the face of Pushmatahaw, his eye wandered rest lessly over the assembly. Should he sacrifice his darling people? Why not give them a chance of life? Many of his clan had died for country and tribe! Could ho not make a harder sacrifice? Many a brawny arm had been lifted at the conclusion of Jackson's defiant...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

l,lllT.TffTRHiyr;'y-i 72 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "W 'J ""-Jf MW?JS supreme! He was the last of the Pushmatahaws in blood and power. Only one youth, a nephew of the chief, bore in his veins the blood of that mighty line. Long years before a great seer had foretold that when no son remained to don the robe of his father, then strangers would seize the land. In the dark watches of the night this dismal prophecy came to Pushmatahaw. Cunecuh, the nephew of the chief, was a lad of eighteen summers, the delight of all the tribe. The young "Bravest of the Brave" they culled him. The old man loved the youth with a deep and ardent love, and now he grieved to think of his pain, but consolation came with the thought, that a "Ilyahpaktuhlo meets death with composure." Up and down ho paced through the long dreary night. The dawn found him there. A shout broke the stillness of the morning air! "'Tis the call for the youths!" A smile broke over his melancholy features, as he heard the answering shout ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

"UT" "TWV "7' PWWU" i mtxxF&z. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 73 thoir hearts in twain? Tho council ground looked co"ld and drear, an em blem of the hearts of its people! Daylight gleamed in surpassing radi ance, the sun rode high in tho azure vault, the flowers nodded lazily to his ardent caresses, tho mocking bird ceased his song, Winona gave no sign of life, a spirit village it seemed. Now evening grew apace, the sun god reined his fiery steed when near the western horizon ad bestowed a parting glance on the little valley. Purple and gold the sky became, the spirits of bygone warriors danced in the west. Push matahaw watched tho sunset from his lonely home and fancied he traced the form of his loved Tallula, beckoning to him from the spirit circle. The sun cast longing glances at Cayuga River, pictured his face upon her placid bosom made her blush a rosy red. Lower sank the sun and lower, until from view he passed. A faint glinting of his last caress tinged the leaves of the forests. W...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

n TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. farewell to all his former warriors, and silently withdrew. Ye have read the far famed "Sigh of the Moor," but the anguish of Boabdil and his men was light compared to this mortal anguish. Warriors who ne'er had shed a tear bowed their heads and wept. Some young maiden commenced the lament, voice after voice joined in the dirge until for miles the sound was heard. The anguish of that autumn! The bitter cold of that winter! 0! Manitou, despairing were the prayers addressed to Thee! Howling, fiercer blew the northern blasts, many drooped and died, buried were they beside the sul len waters. Intense were the suffer ings of that winter. God only knows the pain and woe! Pushmatahaw with Cunecuh wan dered o'er the wild western forests where tread of man had never been. Winter came in fiercest fury, chilled the blood of Pushmatahaw, stiffened all his sinews, racked his frame with constant coughing, feebler grew he and feebler. Cunecuh saw the hand of death uplifted, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

'Si''"''- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 75 boon purified from the stain of venial sins. An intermediate place between hell and the abode of the just, wherein souls may be cleansed, there to remain for a certain time to fill up what was wanting in the measure of their penance, is what the Church understands by pur gatory. The proofs of the existence of such a placo of temporary punishment found in Scripture are many. We mention some of tho most striking only: and first in tho second book of Maccabees we read: "Judas, making a gathering, sent twelve thousand drachmas of silver to Jerusalem for sacrifice, to be offered for the sins of the dead, thinking well and religiously concerning the resurrec tion, and because he considered that they who are fallen asleep with godli ness had great grace laid up for them. It is therefore, a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins." If they used to pray for the dead, they must necessarily have admitted a place where...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

76 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. excuse for feeling no further concern about them. But ns the natural sugges tions of human consciousness revolt from this and prompt us to follow in thought our friends' beyond the grave, so, too, do these suggestions impel us to desire and pray that those we love may attain rest and peace. Therefore, to omit to pray for the dead is unnatural, inhuman. It is not heathenism; it is worse than heathen ism. For the heathens did universally pray for the dead; at least they univer sally had funeral rites or services which embodied this idea more or less clearly. They did it under the suggestions of human consciousness, to which we have already referred; they did it also in accordance with the promptings of the primitive revelation of God to man, which was handed down and diffused by tradition among all nations and which, though broken up into fragments and distorted and perverted by those nations as they fell into idolatry, yet never entirely lost its power, but co...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

j-'jyt- fr'ffxikfWs,-'1' "" .--' ' nifnTF" The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VII. OCTOBER, 1895. No 4. WHrH'uMBBK9IWV'VHHv'"vaHBI,BBia,VKfeBHlESMiK. "K3R 5". 1 - iLr' . 3 C1 k From the discovery of this continent the Church has ever manifested great zeal for the' salvation of the Indians, and the records of the Indian missions form the most glorious pages of her history of America. But never before has she had so many laborers in the field as in our own day. Many of the teaching orders of women have now charge of the schools of the various missions, thus laying the foundations of permanent Christian communities. Here, even more than elsewhere, the school is the nursery of the Church; the latter cannot prosper without the for mer. An illustration will beamisout. Tn the Vicariate Apostolic of the In dian Territory, presided over by His Lordship Mgr. Meerschaerfc, D.D. quern Deus sospitem servet) , there are eleven schools exclusively for the Indian...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

Hjw-Tf -t iP-rsjswpCTK. ffSJ!i!'Vv9H,l'J,f WP lJB'l,l'l?WC?9"li ' 75 TITS INDIAN ADVOCATE. 3. Muscogee, Creek nation; for boys and girls. 4. Pawhuska, Osage nation; for the Osage girls. 5. Purcell, Chickasaw nation; for Chickasaws , Choctaws . Kickapoos ; girls . 6. Sacred Heart Mission; for the Pottowattomie boys. 7. St. Mary's Academy (at Sacred Heart); for the Pottowattomie girls. Besides there are two day schools at Purcell, one for the boys, the other for the girls. Another day school at Muscogee; a school, also, at Quapaw Reserve. pu,ni8. The Sisters of St. Francis teach 3G0 The Sisters of St. Joseph teach 115 The Sisters of Mercy teach . . 55 The Benedictine Fathers teach 40 Total number of pupils taught 570 The number of pupils at Quapaw Reserve is not included in the above enumeration. As a point illustrative of what has been shown above in figures, the Advo cate notices with pride in the last Director' (Hoffmann's) that no less than 213 Indians were baptized last year, viz...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

""n'-afts 2lfflE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 79 God bo for us, who is against us?" Rom. viii:31. Courage, then, co-laborers in the field of Indian missions! the good God is still living. In His own good time He will show His might and put to shame all the black enemies of true Christian civilization. The Advocate kindly reminds those of its subscribers who have forgotten to send the amount duo, to lot us hear from them at an early date. The holy Gospels afford no loss than twenty examples of the efiicacy of con tinued entreaty, and our Lord Himself assures us that the trustful, unceasing prayer from the heart of man cannot fail in gaining its desires. Nor must we omit that During the Agony in the Garden our Divine Redeemer "prayed, saying the self-same words," and "being in an agony, He prayed the longer." HHfii. SBEi jEIBbEi HHflHh- v&&KBSSL T wKL!r i!MK''3BHMH THE HOLY ROSARY. History of the Origin and Growth of this Devotion. It is a natural instinct in the heart of man to suppose t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1895

SSmmmwwfti 80 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. birth of Christianity. In Sanscrit the Rosary is called "Japamata" (mutter ing chaplet), or "Smarani," which means "remembrance." (See Professor Monier Williams, Athenaeum, February 9, 1878.) The Psalter (from a Greek word, meaning literally "a musical instru ment of ten strings") was the term usually employed by the Fathers in speaking of The One Hundred and Fifty Psalms of King David. There are throe dis tinct methods of devotion to the Blessed Virgin, all designated by the name of Psalter. The earliest form of those "Ladye Psalters ' is the one distin guished as the Ave Psalm Psalter. It is composed of 150 versos, each begin ning with the word "Ave," and followed by a quotation from the Psalms. Then there is the Bead Psalter, consisting of 150 Aves and fifteen Paters, but with out the addition of any Psalms, and is called Psalter because in it are used as many Aves as there are Psalms of David. The third method was an abbreviation of the Psalter...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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