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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

THE RHNCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR WEEKLY VOL. 1. NO. 23. PROSPECTS. The fools' crusade by the alleged in dustrial army, is fast degenerating into an ordinary tramp affair. It is indeed a pitiful thing that so many good men should have become involved in this movement with a great number of irresponsible and worthless indi viduals. The wave of sympathy that was aroused by the spectacle of so many men out of work has rapidly subsided as people realized that many of the men were wont-workers, and as their orderly conduct changed to threatening demands for food and shelter and transportation. The sus tenance granted to the organized bands only served to develop the idea that it was their right to be supported by the people a little more thrifty than themselves, and not quite as "hard up" for ready money. The ac tion of the general government in stopping the train stealing came none too soon, and it is a pity that the or iginators of the movement could not be punished as they deserve, or at le...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

o THE STATE OF TKADE. Trade at the coast cities shows little signs of improvement except at Port land, where, since the receding of the water, business is resuming its pro portions previous to the flood. Wheat exports are very slow at San Fran cisco. Fruit shipments from Califor nia are increasing, though the crop is not large. There is a little more ac tivity at Omaha, Detroit and Chicago. At the latter point wholesale orders from distant points are about up to the usual volume at this time of year. There were 20 more failures in the United States the second week in June than in the previous week, but more than 100 less than in the correspond ing week in 1893. Bradstreet's for last week reports that an examination of recent statis tics regarding' the available supplies of wheat in the United States in this and previous years points to the prob ability of the United States having at least 140,000,000 bushels of wheat available for export the year ending July 1, 1895, compared with a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

The Hop Situation. Growth has again been satisfactory and the yards seem to have re covered from the severe whipping by the storms of the first of the month. As regards cultivation, the yards are in fine condition. On Tuesday the writer took a hasty run out to a large number of plantations in the Ahtanum and Wide. Hollow districts. Alfalfa cutting is now demanding almost the entire time of the ranch crews, but they did not begin the hay harvest un til the hops had all needed attention. The same report comes in from all the districts. The ground is free from weeds and in fine condition. Growers are hopeful of everything except high prices, and there are some indications that there may be a slight advance in this direction before harvest is over. The picking question is in a fair way of solution by the hop growers' asso ciation, as will be seen by the report of the recent meeting. Notes from ex changes in other Washington districts are continued. Nothing is doing in coast or eastern m...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

1 NITROGEN FROM THE AIR. Machinery has been set up in New ark, N. J., for manufacturing ammonia from atmospheric nitrogen. Every farmer knows that nitrogen is one of the essential elements of plant food and that it is far the most expensive of the elements that are required in fertilizing mixtures. It is well known, too, that nearly four-fifths of the great ocean of air that surrounds the earth is nitrogen, and that it is practically useless as food to plants, though they are bathed in it all the time. Recent researches have shown, it is true, that a small portion of this nitrogen can be utilized by certain plants, especially those belonging to the pulse family, but there never has been any available method of transforming the nitrogen of the air into plant food for general use. Of course it is not wise to ex pect too much from any reported dis covery, but if it is true that the su' phate of ammonia can be produced by this new process at about one-third of its present cost, this wil...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

A Window Pastel. The Man sat at the window. It was easy to see that the world had dealt kindly with The Man. The room was sumptously furnished and The Man was well groomed. The red rays of the setting sun fil tered into the room through the boughs of a budding tree, outlining- on the ta pestried wall the maiden-like contours of the young leaves in a group of dancing elfland sprites. Using their wands with nature's impartiality, the magic rays tipped with gold the scat tered gray hairs commingled in the locks that graced the temples of The Man. Tenderly, and with the reverential touch of one who is permitted to take in his hand a fragment of some sweet saint's robe, The Man held in his soft and tapering1 fingers a lock of hair. "Only a woman's hair," blonde and silky and soft. For a long time The Man sat in si lence, gazing- at the little silken lock. Once he sighed and passed his hand over the tress with a motion that the observer might have interpreted as a caress. The sun sank low...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

c> THE INTERVIEWER. Potatoes, Onions, Carrots-Experience of J. W. Young, One of Arid Empire's Most Successful Growers— Preparation of Ground, Planting, Cultivating, Harvest ing and Storing—Crops for an Alkali Soil, Etc. J. W. Young has a "forty" south of town and adjoining the school sec tion on the east. His specialty is po tatoes, though he grows quite an acre age of onions, cabbages, carrots and other truck. Thk Ixtkkviewkk cor raled the gentleman at The Ranch office yesterday and he yielded up a large store of information without the least symptom of bucking or kicking. Mr. Young has the name among North Yakima dealers of marketing the very best of everything he turns his hand to. Your land is to some extent sub-irri gated, I believe, said The Interview- Kk. It is, hence it needs very little irrigation, but I have had consider able experience on an irrigated farm. I have been informed that you make a specialty of potato-growing; will you tell me something about your methods? ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

in handling. The cost of growing is not heavy. Top with a hoe, plow a furrow alongside the row and throw the carrots out with a fork. Do carrots require much water? They will take a good deal; give it to them occasionally through the sea son. Do you pit them? I do. Put a little straw over them and cover lightly with dirt for winter. They will stand the cold in good shape. What is the best variety? I like the half-long Danvers. They are about right for easy digging and yield well. Don't forget to say, plow deep for car rots; also that when sown as I have stated, no thinning will be required. HOP GROWERS' ASSOCIATION. The attendance at the adjourned meeting of the Yakima hop growers' association on Saturday afternoon was well attended by prominent growers. A. B. Weed called the meeting- to or der and briefly stated the objects of the association. He suggested that the first business in order would be the election of officers. D. E. Lesh was nominated for the position of president and ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

8 THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It Price —$1.00 a year in advance. Wohtii —Two gold dollars. Monthly Edition. 50c. a year. Conducted by E. H. Libby. Managing Editor, W. W. Cokhett. Published by the YAKIMA PUBLIHIV } t; )Vi:» YVY. EDITORIAL OFFICES: NOKTH YAKIMA. WASHINGTON. business offices: North Yaklina, Yakima:Avenue. Seattle, Room 7, Hinckley Block. Tacuraa, 1113 Pacific Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. A fairly windy day is the best hay day. It is not the blistering- sunshine that turns out the best fodder. What's the matter with putting in a patch of buckwheat early next week. Pancake days are not so very far away. A few early-bird citizens are enjoy ing the luxury of new popatoes fresh from their own gardens. The first ap peared in market on Monday, June 18. How are the crops and "things" that are intended to grace the state fair next September getting along? Of course they are getting all needed attention. If not, why not? Best time in the world to buy pigs....

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

ABOtiT INSECTS. [All inquiries concerning insects or plant dis eases should be accompanied by specimens. If possible. In sending insects please ob serve the following directions: Adult in sects should first be killed. This can easily and quickly be done by putting the insect for a few moments in a closed vessel with a few drops of chloroform. Any method, however, which does not mutilate the specimens, will answer. Place the speci mens to be sent in a stout tin or wooden box. packing them with cotton, so they will not be broken. Caterpillars and other lar val forms should be sent alive, care being taken to put enough of the food plant in the box to last two days. Do not punch holes in the box. The mailing rate on pack ages of Insects or plants is 1 cent per ounce. Accompany the specimens with your notes and observations. Write your name plain ly on the outside of the package, and ad dress It to Prof. C. V. Piper. Pullman, Wash. INSECTS INJURIOUS TO SUGAR BEET. The Small-Punctured Fle...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

V^Tn DAIRY ITEMS. Bitter cream is the result of too long keeping. Cream, at longest, should not stand over 36 hours after skim ming. A Jersey breeder announces that it is easier to make good butter from the Channel Island cows (Jerseys or Guern seys) than from other breeds. The butter will "stand up" under treat ment that spoils other butter. But with skill, gilt-edged butter can be made from cows of any breed. Farm, Stock and Home says: Min nesota factories have seen the error of their ways and adopted the cheddar process, but have made the mistake of attempting to place their close, firm cheese on the market before it was ripe. This cheese could not be sold at any price, but was finally returned, placed in cold storage, and in the fall sold at from 11 to 14 cents, netting a good profit. L,udvig Stenstrup, a Dane, has come over to America to teach Yankees how to milk, or rather how to stop milking by hand altogether. He has a machine that he claims will do the work of three men. It...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

with a wax wrapper. String will not do as the buds will dfly out. Next season again take buds from this new growth and halve them with half-buds of Meditterranean Sweets. Here then you get a growth which includes all the varieties named. "At the end of three weeks from bud ding- the wrapper has to be removed and the buds examined with a magni fying glass. If the union is complete at the crown of the germ, return the wrapper to exclude sun and air until the bud starts to grow. Sometimes only one-half of the bud starts to grow. All such should be cut out and the bud ding done over again. Sometimes both halves die or both halves grow separately. Then it has to be done over again on a new place in the stock. There ought to be at least fifty buds of each combination put in at the same time, to cover failures." This is an interesting communica tion to say the least, for any part of the country. The process may sug gest still further experiments among the growers of other sorts of fruit, t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

To THE POETICAL PATCH-QUILT. I only know she came and went — Lowell. Like troutletfl ill a pool— — Hood. She was a phantom of delight. --Wordsworth. And I was like a fool! —Kastman. "One kiss, dear maid." I said, and llghed, —Coleridge. •Out of those lips unshorn;" —Longfellow. She shook her ringlet! round her head —Stoddard. Anil laughed in merry scorn. —Tennyson. Ring out. ye hells, to the wild sky. —Tennyson. You hear them. <>. my heart! —Alice Gray. Tis twelve at night l»y the cast le clock. —Coleridge. Heloved. we must parti —A Hoe Gray. "Come back, come hack!'" he cried in grief, —Campbell. "My eyes are dim with tears— —Bayard Taylor. How shall I live through all the days, —Mrs. Osgood. Through all this life of fears?" —il. C. Reynolds. Twas in the prime of summer time —Hood. She blessed me with her hand; -IToyt. We strayed together, deeply blessed, — Mrs. Kdwards. Into the dreaming land. —Cornwall. The laughing bridal roses blow —Pat more. To dress her dark brown hair; ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

earth below his feet. He was so worn out and discouraged that nothing but a kind of dogged persistency enabled him to take up his spade; but he did take it up, set his foot upon it, and with all his strength sent it down a few inches. Then he discovered that the spade was held fast in the clay, and he could neither pry the earth out with it nor draw it out. The thought of Johns' dream flashed over him, and with a short laugh at his own folly, he snatched up the iron crowbar and began picking at the clay beside the spade. For a moment it was tough and obdurate; then, to his surprise, it seemed a little looser. The gleam of hope animated him, and he began dashing the crowbar down with all his might. One, two three violent blows, and the crowbar slipped from his hands and sank away into some unknown depth, and up through the orifice the flood came pouring like a river. "Johns! Johns! Wind up!" he shouted wildly, shaking the rope and looking- upward, but the face of his hired man was no...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

1 \ ODDS AND ENDS. A lost nut or a loose bolt, worth a nickel or less, may wreck a hundred dollar machine. Keep a sharp ear for any unusual rattle in the mower or other implements, and a sharp look for the taughtness of things. The Carpenter cheese factory at Yakitna City will begin operations on Monday, June 25. The apparutus is first-class from beginning- to finish, and an expert cheese maker will have charge of the work. The business management of the concern will rest with W. H. Carpenter. Here is a small water calculation that may be found useful: There are 6,272,640 square inches in an acre. One inch of water or a stream of water one inch wide and one inch deep, flowing at the rate of four miles an hour, will give 6,082,560 inches in twenty-four hours. This would require about 25, --920 gallons or 823 barrels of water. An eastern dairy paper tells of a new use for skim milk. After the milk has been creamed by the centrifuge the skim milk is sterilized by heating to destroy all...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

A Maryland fanners' club puts forth the following formula for the cure of scab in sheep: Thirty pounds.of sul phur, 10 pounds of lime boiled in 50 gallons of water; then add water so as to make 250 gallons. Dip the sheep at a temperature of 115 to 120 degrees. Leave in long enough to soak the wool, and then duck the head under quickly. The operation must be repeated in eight or ten days, to kill any germs that at first were not far enough de veloped to be destroyed. A writer in an exchange says the best way to keep out moths in beehives is by the use of salt. Put in the salt as you put away your combs. Hold the combs in your left hand, take your right hand and throw the salt against the comb. Be sure and get it all over both sides and put in a tight box and in a dry place. It must be dry, or the salt will nielt and injure the combs. When ready to use again shake out the salt a little. Some salt won't harm the bees. We of the arid region really know little of the real length and brea...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 23 June 1894

It. Irrigation is King and We are the People! Our great $75,000 cash pumping plant is in operation, irrigating 3,000 acres of the finest land under the sun. Prosser is the commercial town of the lower Yakima valley. 50,000 sheep are sheared here. The great Horse Heaven wheat and stock country of 400,000 acres is at our backs. The wonderful Sunnyside region is before us. The Northern Pacific railroad runs through our midst. *Now we are going to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will take care of itself. We are going to show our opportunities honestly and truth- fully, and we are going to help the people who come here. No fairy tales will be told. We are here to win, and those who come and stay with us will win, too. We will meet you half way on any fair proposition. Come and see us and our splendid country and opportunities will grow on you, and you will throw off your coat and gv> to workwith us. rro&serFalls Irrigation Company, address, FRED. R. REED, Manager, pr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

ITHE RHNCHi VOL. 1. NO. 25. PROSPECTS. We do not believe in "trusts," but there is good in every honest combina tion that regulates marketing so as to avoid ruinous competition. For ex ample, the Portland dealers tried to break the market on strawberries and forced prices down to a point that would hardly pay shipping expenses. The fruit growers' union then got in its work and refused to deliver at less than profitable prices, and prices, too, that the consumers were perfectly willing to pay. The union won, of course, and the growers made a fair profit. The fruit growers of Califor nia have been gradually combining by counties and districts. Now there seems to be a combination of various movements that bid fair to result in a general union of the fruit growers of the state. The latest is the California Canneries company, that is inviting all the canneries into a general com pany or "trust" that will control the output and the market, and put a stop to the wholesale cutting- of price...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

2 ists, and no political trouble results. Kither government control or compul sory arbitration must result from these numerous troubles. Arbitration, in effect, is government control, for it is control by the people. The great strike interferes little with the farm interests in this section. The growers of small fruits, cher ries, etc., who depend upon distant markets, will be out somewhat, of course. Beyond this our crops are not ready for the market, and so long as the weather is good they go right along maturing. California fruit growers, however, must be losing heavily. Hundreds of car loads must be sidetracked all along the route to Chicago, and hundreds more are per ishing where they grew. The com mercial canneries must be doing their utmost to utilize the product, but doubtless they will force down prices and reap a harvest at the expense of the growers. The present condition furnishes a strong argument in favor of individual and association driers and canneries. These are th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

louse is at work in most of the yards, but the quassia chips which most grow ers use for a spraying- solution have not arrived. The supply was due and expected at the time the strike was or dered. Every day's delay may mean great and speedily increasing damage to those depending- upon this material. Fortunate is the man who had a sup ply left over from last year, but such cases are rare. The same state of af fairs may exist in Oreg-on, but of that we have no assurance. If the strike continues it will mean ruin to the hopes of many growers, for the cli matic conditions are very favorable to the rapid multiplication of the pest. Shipping Potatoes in Boxes. The Yakima Artesian and Land company are having boxes made for the shipment of three car loads of new potatoes to the Sound upon the re sumption of railway traffic. The boxes will contain 60 pounds each. It is believed that potatoes thus shipped will be sure of ready sale by the re tail grocers to their customers. The potatoes will ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 7 July 1894

I STOCK ECONOMICS. Smutty oats should never be fed to horses. A recent bulletin of the Idaho experiment station treats of this sub ject, and of the method of removing the smut from the grain. This is done by treating- the oats to a bath of hot water, 130 to 140 degrees, the Michigan method. This destroys the vitality of one seed without injuring the other. In Idaho the last year one-fifth of the crop was destroyed by smut —an aver age loss of $50 per farm. We find this in an exchange, credit ed to an old horseman: If a horse will not allow himself to be handled, or his feet to be taken up without trying to bite or kick, tie his head and tail to gether, about three feet apart, and take him into the yard and make him dance around. Do not drive him too fast, or he may tumble and injure himself. Do not follow it up but for a very short time, since this position is exhausting". He will shortly be con vinced that he must yield. If he tries to kick and bite in the stable while be ing curri...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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