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Elephind.com contains 317 items from Polynesian, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 7 August 1841

i T POLYIE Hid J. JAEtVI, Editor. POSTS?. natii::iay, aiu i;t 7, isii. Vol. 2. No. O. NOW AM) THEN . nv jam: taylor. di-itiint. days of wild romance, OfniiJgio mist and fable; j Whoa stones could argue, trees advance, And brutes to talk were nolo; hen shrubs and flowers were said to preach. iid manage all the parts of speech; was then, no d ubt, if 'twas at all, (But doubts we need not mention, (hat T nnv and Now, two adverbs small, Lngngcd in sharp contention; ut bow they made each other hear. 'Tradition doth not make appear. 'hex was a sprite of subtle frame, 1 With rainbow tints invested; (J11 clouds of dazzling light she came, 4 And stars her forehead crested; Iler sparkling eye of azure hue, Qeemed borrowed from the distant blue. low rested on the solid earth, I And sober was her vesture; ' 'Jie seldom either grief or mirth JExpress'd by word or gesture; niposed, sedate, and firm she stood, id look'd industrious, calm, and good. ,'jiev, sang a wild fantastic song, i Light us th...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 7 August 1841

a n T II i: V 0 L V N ES i A N. AtfHs, SBR 1 ..... it .1... I..I. E tun iii filtiinul ill l'mr frl I.. i 1 wore a hfldgc m mourning on m iuu huh, m "" J " , """eriyoJ t . i. - r i ..!.. it.... t r .... i ....:.! . I rmivocai uiarits oi ap piooanou. iiifhivasoi miscs iihi iimiN, iminun iiiui u. """o ...--v.. :n . , . ., . .... - . ... . u .ti i'. .. . 1' .....I H mill triiinirr niiiT-ifrmi in iiiiu jr..i I.... GanL'wav hardlv knew w rit to make of! vjen. Daw anl (iav Lussae. I never H and the lames on me icu wmsi. um;.. j - -i-", uui noi . I .1 . I . IT IB . . . . - ......... I ail I i llintl 11 I A fill., Hl - .ssioiis occurreu iiirougnum. mu . in". n - - c principal street and public l Hanapcpe valley, like most ol the ot10r Tiiiijf unniijr Mien Mini o iii-ikij im i uij, wihi uhv jjmh. i in,aii it but as he supposed it was a fair wuycould 1:0 into his study without hi cdiinLr pi "cessions oecu of settling accounts with Jim, he al.jo&my sliins over retoits and crucibles; andfiln...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 7 August 1841

i t ii e p o i. v n i: s i a x . 35 !, innocent victim of Ins good character tir inure precious than wealth) uml there-5 W is suiitv ol something worse than rob A v e v li semen Vs. f .1 1 . f iLM 1 .1 111 rv. m me m us hi rsnaivcspcare, lie. 4 Jat filches Irom inc; my good name, Inbs nits of that which not enriches him, and makes me poor indeed. " Is the ,rct dagger of the mid-night assassin 'j.iro to be dreaded than the busy tongue jf tlio slanderer ? j lTlie murderer though great indeed his time, i in some decree exposed to dan lr, ami stakes something in aeeoniplish f his horrid purpose; but the slanderer, -Jcure from any opposition, secretly dealsjj lc death-blow to the character of his fel-jv-inaii, damns him in the estimation of iose who know him, blasts his prospects ii life, and makes him undeservedly odi 'tis to the world. The murderer destroys $v mortal part of man, the slanderer mur rs " that immortal part the reputation : " 4d in small degree in my humble ostium-Ja Jul,...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 7 August 1841

THE PUL V NKSI A N . .-m:i,f.ct!;i. too ?.(j';'!('.i.c.i: id till t;j:: ji: iu.? or Burn h by far the rea:et poet that ever pnm;; from the lx -: i ti' the people, ami lived nrn.1 1k.i1 iri a hnmhh' e'..n!:ti .-ti. in deed, no count!;' in the uo'hl but Scotland cotild have produced uch a i.uui; unci he will bo frever regarded as Ihc iuriuus rep- rccntati vc of t.ie :. eiuiMol his country He v.cs born n c t . ii'ever man was, and tc his m.!ive penius alone ii owing the perpetuity ofhiij fume. For he manifestly iiad never very deeply studied pot try as an art, nor lea toned much about its principles, nm looked abroad with the wide ken of intellect for ob jects and subject: on which to pour out his inpi alien The condition of the peasantry of Scotland, the happiest, perhaps that Prov idence ever allowed t the children of labor, was not surveyed and speculated on by him as the field of poetry, but as the field of his own exist,i,.oo; and he chronicled tho events that passed tie re, not m...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 14 August 1841

PTH TTTT U7 TTT sn tt tyt txt tti n tt a tyt il- it' till lor .be , J. J.VUVUS, Editor. s.ri!iu.v, awwi'st n, isn. Vol. a.-so. 10. rati M-jmM From the Irish i'enny Journal. THE WORLD'S CHANGES. The )he " Contarini Fleming wroto merely, Time." . D'lsRAELt THE YOUNGER. ic Solemn Shadow that bears in his hands conquering Scythe and the Glass of Sands, used once on his flight where the sunrise shone :.. i . l a wariiKe uuy s lowers oi sione; Xni he asked of a panoplied soldier near, "How long has this tbrtressed city been here.'" nd the man looked up, Man's pride on his brow "The city stands here from the ages of old; yid as it was then, and as it is now, bo will it endure till the funeral knell Of the world be knolled, 1 As eternity's annals shall tell." And after a thousand years were o'er, 1 Enough said the Shadow, and passed from the spot; At last it is vanished, the beautiful youth Of the earth, to return with no To-morrow ; All changes have chequered Mortality's lot; But this is t...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 14 August 1841

P,3 BY JOHN FROIT, KPIIOK OK tHK tf:KI,T MK1 K M 't K R , PHI h. I) K J. I' II I A . Continue, fiom pig' -.. Pome time in his junior year lie became acquainted with the Gre enoughs, and a:i n necessary ouiMMpienee to one of his mercurial temper, he was iuoeul.ited i 1 ! i the hive of ni t. His hortus mou, inii; eraN. and butterflies were now thio-.m nide, and all hi" eoneinrio'i was of Correghn and stuff. " Mis summer af ternoons, instead of hcitej ' nt in a ram ble to sweet Auburn or Fiesh Pond with a tin ho under his arm. were ayn-eaMv whiled away in the study ol 1 loi a' to whom lie .so;iieti,nes hated his h'.Miit bust or well tuimd h -j. aid lepnid In his services as a neuh I for the dt liIiti d le.-.-sons o:i art. whieli he diew lioui the run versation of the youu sculptor. This agreeable occupation w;s varied by an oc casional call upon John ( ireenoM.;h, the brother of Horatio, who occupied npnil inents in a j lensuut litde cottav.e :u ll;e wes'crn part of the town. From this...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 14 August 1841

h - . A 841 .J T HE P 0 L Y N E S I A N . SSI I ( In full view from Woimca is the islam! of ihau. Its greatest length is 13 miles, its eadtli 3; though the average is not more ;, ,5, Its elevation is about 2000 fort, ill III. I ft l ilsifftt . .ft . . i n h K -1 . ! . t . barren soil, which produces nothing hut a x bunted shrub, onions, yams and pota- mm... v . ... 1 i' , ri. i iiu iiiiiuMiu:iiM miner rnucu irom V:it of water; their sole dependence being it rain, which i collected and preserved j reservoirs. I Ins island is noted for the jai'il'ieturn of mats, some of which are of tj..! finish and very costlv. A ini!' to the west of Nihau, is I'g is ' ii, I, It is a mere rock, of about 1000 leet t vatiou, and covered with stunted shrubs, tvx a'l'otd food to thousands of wild rab" t. with which the island j overrun. 'jWaiinea according to native tradition, eiims the honor of being the liirit landing ji, c of ' at. Their introduction was af ter the toll wing manner: A woman hav jr, as...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 14 August 1841

4X) THE POLYNESIAN. August V. LUC TED. RcsotrucKS ok tup. West Few persons, we susj)f(.t, thoroughly leaiue what are the capacities uftlio valley of the Mississippi, though every body has been talking and writ ing about them the.-se twenty years. A wri ter in the X. Y. Review sets this matter in a most forcible light as follows: " Look at it; in that valley are one million four hundred thousand square miles, or eight hundred and ninety-six millions of acres, while Great Britian, with all its islands, con tains but about eighty-eight thousand square miles, or riltysix and a half million of acres. And what is the character of this vast region? One third of it, ut least, is capable of culti vation, and thick settlement, and one third is four hundred and sixty-six thousand square miles in extent, about seven times as great an area as all the available land in England, Wales, Scotland, and the islands. Look :s it more minutely, and you find it, from the cleared fields of Ohio and Indiana...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 21 August 1841

1 j. J.1IIVI2S, Editor. SlTliUJAY, AUGUST SI, 1811. Vol. a.-Io. 11. POLYN 5m Ik THE DAWN IS imr.AKIN( OEtt US. BY T. JIOOIIE. The dawn is breaking o'er us, See, heaven liutb caught its hue! We've clay's long light before us, What sport shall we pursue I The hunt o'er hill and lea? The sail o'er summer sea? Oh let not hour so sweet Unwing'd by pleasure licet. The dawn is breaking o'er us, See, heaven hath caught its hue! We've day's long light before us, What sport shall we pursue? Hut sec, while we're deciding, What morning sport to play, The dial's hand is gliding, And morn hath passed away. Ah, who'd have thought that noon Would o'er us steal so soon; That mom's sweet hour of prime Wonld last so short a time? But come, we've day before us, Still heaven looks bright and blue; Quirk, quick, ere eve come o'er us, What sport shall we pursue? Alas why thus delaying? We're now at evening's hour; Its farewell beam is playing O'er hill and wave and bower. That light we thought would last,...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 21 August 1841

4? T II i: P O L Y N E S 1 A N. coist, all ol which areen:ja;ed in furthei in.r its operations in thtt ..ni tel. Goods fur the trade nn; iiiij !"Um i to Fort Van couver ilirocrll v from I.o;idu. and the furs collected :it that post an; annually whipped to the Urili-i'i metropolis. It i evident tint in or i jr to support the nnchinery uf so g'uantie an est iblish Jis!nn;:it v. tliat of the Hudson's iV:y Company, th prop's "I the trade inu-t he im.iiMrc as is proved by its annual re turns. Tlit? value of furs collected in i y -2 . is shown lv ihee returns to !.ae 1ye;i v't) 1,81!) ."j"). Til? shares of the corporation have increased from -10 per cent below par to 1 11) per cent above par, and the business of the association has advanced to the vearlv sum of 1 .000.000 dollars. Tin; animal amount of the value of the peltries exported from America by the Hudson's l'ay Company between 18-27 and I83.'J, according to Mr McGregor, was one million of dollars ; w hile Mr Wy eth estimates the ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 21 August 1841

jcji. t' n with the systematic competition cx-pC-jnced from that powerful company, of S it gives so full an account. We do tzi yc r(,rn any invitjiog? feeling of li iC J, b,lt ,nul tnc hushicss public here may be $'tcr acquainted with the resources and p :y of that power, which at this particular jc -rR seems to have entered upon a cam p'ja of extermination against all rival trn icrJ0r merchant?, and in the words of the aut3r referrpd to, 11 njypcars lobe destined lotwalloin up ull other commercial enterprises reach. " As far as social habits arc concerned, the ckief; factor at Fort Vancouver, Dr. Mc Laughlin, hai pcrppred for the Company an eariiblc reputation for hospitality and kind- nera..1 Few strangers of any nation have erer tisited their posts without being receiv ed with a hospitality which knew no bounds until every want of the traveller was provid ed for. The American Missionaries in par ticular have experienced from them much at&stion and assistance, and at times whe...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 21 August 1841

41 THE POL Y N i: S I A N s i;i.i:cti:i), IJkpk.nh upon voir own Exr.uno.s von Si itokt. This is an e.v ?ll''nt orinciple fur the working and trading classes id'tho com inanity to adopt, !nt tho tmu jhil ;)sophy of it is scarcely understood, rsotwithstnndin'.; the ninny ties that connect a man with soci ety, he nevertheless has ' imprinted on his forehead the original doom, that lie im.st he chielly dependent on his own lahor and ex ertions lor Mipport. It is an incontiovi i ti lde fact, lomxlcd iion enciul experience, that where a man tnMs to his own exertions in life, lie generally succeeds, if not in amassing a fortune, at least in obtaining a comfortable living. On the other hand, he who depends upon others tor his success in lite, often finds himself wofully disappointed. Nothing gives so good an assurance of well doing as the personal activity of a man daily exerted forhisown interest. Hut should the same indiv idual find himself suddenly oilcrcd a patronage; likely to enrich ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 28 August 1841

TMJ.POLYN SEAN 1 "If f. TM11.U.. IAJ IU. ' ;j U "1 J. JAUYI3S, Editor, SATURDAY, AUGUST SS, 1811. Vol, 9. Ao. 12, T POETS. 7.. prom Ul.i:k wood's Magazine for Jan. THE TRAVEU.KIt'.S EVENING SONG. BY MIH II KM A NS. Father, guide me! Day declines. Hollow winds aro in the pines, Darkly waves each giant bough O'er the sky's last crimson glow; I lush '(1 is now' the convent's bell, Which erewhilo with breezy swell From the purple mountains boro iGrcetinu to the bunset-shore : J'ow the sailqr's vesper-hymn, I Dies away. Father! in, the forest dim, Be my stay! In the lowly shivering thrill , 01 the leaves, that late hung still; In the dull and muffled tone Of the sea-wave's distant moan; In the deep tints of the sky, Thcre arc signs of tempests nigh, Ominous, with sullen sound, Falls the echoing dust around. Father! through the storm and shade, O'er the wild, iOh! be Thou the lone one's aid- Save thy child! pTany a swift and sounding plume Homeward through the boding gloom, fO'er my way h...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 28 August 1841

4H T II J2 I'OLVNESI A N. ST, If the king is iii particular need, or a well vh;it kinds of produce are suited to ants, landlords, sub-tenants, servants of landlord, it will not tlien bo proper IW each particular land and to all the lands , chief, persons having no land, and va- the people to refuse to exchange days, jfrotri one end to the other. And they grants. According to this book it is best They shall exchange, and on tho above jshall give special charge on this subject to' to have one, and one only fixed business, conditions, though any man may refuse i the tenant' of their land, so that they and to engage in it with high hopes in to exchange when it is of special disad- may cultivate extensively all such articles j Umi who aids us by the rain from Ilcav- vantago to himself, as 'shall be profitable.' The landlords en. Such a course would be a benefit to The same privilege shall also be given ; shall derive their profit and loss from their j all who live and labor in our kingdo...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 28 August 1841

THE POLYNESIAN. '17 ;i:iv more grand in their outline; but as my diil not carry mo to their summits, I j not venture to say much about tliem, Lticuhirly us it would be infringing upon a i . i . i . . 4.1 Jit I ) I C I sunn; n'unsis aueiii ii nave ap- jMjll'liUCU l" ll IMSV'l 1-3) HUll 111 in UI lOlllg and rain, tho dampness is great, and tlio mosses which encircle every limb, like the haggy coat of the Greenland hear, arc sat urated with water. The young tree is here to be seen in all its vigor, maintaining an un equal contest with a legion of parasitical ; verdure, anu alter a lew gulches arc may be con 'cf .iM-d, we shall he there. These gulches graceful an '4c ;iu abomination to man and beast; their ; stroyf.d by "h iiro very apt to be laid in u soft, udhe-i while the o iss they have not seen, though it cannot i vines, and numerous families of ferns, which v Mam oi ineiu ui iii.Mu man. ui him:ii, ; jiko leeches are exhausting its life blood; .t they leave unwritten what they have...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 28 August 1841

! (AUGlsT '48 THE POLYNESIAN. SELECTED. Buttons The making of these indis pensable articles is taking an honorable rank among our domestic manufactures -so much so, that the force of the adage, " Having a soul above buttons," is somewhat diminish ed. The Northampton Courier gives the following account of the process: Perhaps not one man in a thousand sus pects that almost all the buttons which orna ment garments in the United States, are made in a small village in Hampshire Coun ty, Mass. But such is the fact; and it is actually new to us, as it will doubtless be to the reader. Not many years have elapsed shce foreign buttons were exclusively used in this country. More recently sewed but ton were introduced, made up by the girls; but these have been almost entirely super edel by a much more superior article, man ufactured by machinery by the Messrs J. &. .1 Hayden, for Mr Samuel Williston, of Easthamptnn. We are indebted to the politeness of Mr Joel Hayden, last week for an ampl...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 4 September 1841

FTP! 1 PO 3 SIAM ii r. . n 11 MIA s3 Ij, J. JAKVI2S, Editor. P OUTSIT. atiis:ejav, SEPTEMBER 1, 1841. Vol. S. IVo, 10, MOZART'S UKdU 1EM. ny Rurvs uawej! The tongue of the vigilant cluck tolled one, 1 Ilia.' In ;i ik'ep anu Hollow lone; The shrouded moon looked out noon A cold, dank region, more cheerless and 1 uun, ly the lurid light that shone. Jlozart now rose from a restless bed, And his heart was sick with care; Though long had he wooingly sought to wed Sweet Sleep, 'twas in vain, tor the coy maid lied, Though he followed her every where. Jle knelt to the God of his worship then, Anu breathed a tervent prayer; Twas halm to his soul, and he rose ajiain With strengthened spirit, hui stuitcd when lie marked a stranger there. ale was tall, the stranger' w ho gazed on him, rapped high m a sable suroitd; His cheek was pale, and his rye was dim, Viki the melodist tremhled in every limb, 1 lie while his heait heat loud. I' Tfil'Fn 4 I 1 I fc . I . - 1 . . . . r- n V M J T I . Who canno...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 4 September 1841

h f0 stances were vuin. The blind Didyiuus was no less immovable. He wad nlwavs submissive ; though the guards, with a re finement of barbarity, would not permit his mother Monica to lead him and assist him in his labors. After the death of Kaahumann, which occurred on the 5th of June, Kinau and Karuohi1 took advan tage of the inlluence they enjoud.to con tinue the persecution. In June, IS32, the wall which the prisoners! were required to build, was completed, and the uatds inked them what was their thought. They replied, ' It is that we cil e; home, as our work is done." One of the guaid replied, ''In ordvr to go -home, you must reject the prayers of the missionaih's, their God, and their idolatry." The christians answered, by the mouth of Dirlymus. that they could not cease to serve the Lord. Then a kumu declared that. the. men should make five fathoms more of wall, Didymus three; that the women should be separated from their husband, and tent among the girls of bad character ; th...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 4 September 1841

1841. i.l n ti A nrrea nmnnnruil In tU.. . t 11140 U ,,v iw! wv,mifwivw V4 U furmer times, very low. Blort, (for the same period.) I'noDt'cc or thr Sanq. Isls. Articles. Vnii. Rullack Hides, IjOJ, at $2 each, & lO.UOO i,at Skins, I8.0J0 at .13 cts ea.. 4,140 jr,nvn Sugar, k),OJJ lbs. at 5 cts., 3,00J M Iases Syrup, 6,0. U gals. tf.-J cts., I. itfj i.lt, 1 ,80 J barrels, at - - - - vf,i50 jerm Oil, vessels fitted from Hono lulu, 410 bbls.. at g.M per bbl., 9,900 Irr-nv R'Hit, ill.OO ) lbs. at 4 cts , 3,30 uiiJijci, vi.. I ulii Hapou, (a moss,) Mustard bocd, Leat lobaccu, Cnuo Nut Oil, etc., 2,090 alt and Fresh Provisions, Vegeta bles, etc., 'etc., a dd to Men ot War, Whaling and Merchant Vessels, 09200 Total amount of exports, nat. prod. GJSO Remarks. This year's crop of sugar and Violates has not yet been exported. The ijtiantity produced far exceeds that of last tear, and will continue to increase yearly. I)ving to the kapu on killing wild bullock, lid by the King for five year...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 4 September 1841

52 THE POLY- N ESI A.N. September SELECTED. Anecdote of a Doctor. A young Incty consulted u physician oiVrtiinence on account of some rheumatic pains, and a troublesome cough, which she had labored under ever since the commencement of the cold weath er. The prescription was sent by the loot man to the apothecary's as usual. lie read it with a smile, and recommended the mes senger to take it to a dry goods' mnn on the opposite side of the street, ns apothecaries did not keep the articles prescribed; upon which the luottnan inquired what the doctor had ordered, when ho was informed by iI2s culapius that the prescription ran thus: Take a good warm double Scotch shawl, and apply it immediately around the shoul ders and chest; and also, secundum urtna, a Stout Welsh Petticoat." Young Lr.Y. A man swearing the peace against three of his sons, thus concluded the affidavit: " And this deponent further suitli, that the only one of his children w ho showed him anv real filial aflVction, was hi...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
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