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Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Domestic. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

Domestic. Tremendous Storm. The great snow storm of the season, visited us on Sunday, commencing between four and five o’clock in the morning, and continuing, with great violence and a strong notherly wind, throughout the day. The snow drifted badly, and some of the sidewalks of the city were nearly impassable. There has been many bad accidents on our coast and elsewhere, a few particulars of which we subjoin:— At Salem and Providence, the storm was very severe, and is said to have been unequalled by any which had been experienced for several years. At Albany, and along the route, the snow fell from fifteen to twenty inches in depth. The New York papers state the snow storm commenced in that city about eight o’clock on Saturday night and ended about two o’clock on Sunday afternoon. The shipping in that harbor did not sustain any damage of consequence, but three small vessels broke adrift at the foot of Jay street, and two persons belonging to one of them are supposed to have been dr...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ARRIVAL OF THE CAMBRIA!!! 31 DAYS LITER FROM EUROHE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

ARRIVAL OF THE CAMBRIA!!! 31 DAYS LITER FROM EUROHE. T. D. McG. The Cambria arrived at 10 o’clock on Wednesday night, after an extraordinary passage of fourteen days! She brought 99 passengers from Liverpool, 13 of whom were left at Halifax. While the Cambria was at Halifax, the agents for the New York and Philadelphia expresses obtained from her a bundle of papers, and started off in a sleigh. It is stated that they passed through this city about 9 o’clock on Wednesday night. The letter of Mr. M’Gee will give our readers a fair idea of w T hat is going on in Parliament From Our Foreign Correspondent. London, Jan. 3, 1846. OPENING THE SESSION-THE QUEEN'S SPEECH. Thursday, the 22nd of January, in this present year of our Lord, was a day of unusual serenity in London. The sky was actually visible at noon, and excited no ordinary admiration, among the crowds who streamed alqng the strand, Whitehall, and Parliament street, down to the open Palace yard where her Majesty was to alight in ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE QUEEN'S SPEECH. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

THE QUEEN'S SPEECH. Peel’s dodge is Free trade and Peace, with, perhaps, coercion in Ireland. We subjoin the passages ol the speech which foreshadow his course on these turning points. 1 regret that the conflicting claims of Great Britain and the United States in respect of the territory on the North Western Coast of America, although they have been made the subject of repeated negotiation, still remain unsettled. Vou may be assured that no effort consistent with national honor shall be wanting on my part to bring this question to an early and peaceful termination. I have observed, with deep regret, the very frequent instances in which the crime of deliberate assassination has been of late committed in Ireland. It will be your duty to consider whether any measures can be devised, calculated to give increased protection to life, and to bring to justice the perpetrators of so dreadful a crime. I have had great satisfaction in giving my assent to the measures which you have presented t...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MORE ACCESSIONS TO ROME. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

MORE ACCESSIONS TO ROME. The seccessions to the Catholic Church. Mr. Newman and his friends will remove from Littlemore to a college near Birmingham, where the}' will pursue their ecclesiastical studies under the superintendence of the Right Rev. Doctors W'alsh and Wiseman, Bishops of the Midland District. The Rev. Messrs. Capes, Collyns, Neave, and Estcourt, remain at Prior Park, near Bath; Mr. Oakelv enters at St. Edmund’s College, in the diocese of London.—Morning Post. Mr. Simpson, of St. John’s College, Oxford, has, we understand, been received into the Roman Catholic Church.—Morning Post. Secessions from the Protestant Church. The Rev. Spencer Northcote, M.A., late scholar of Corpus Christi College, has been received into the Roman Catholic church at Prior Park. Mr. Northcote obtained the highest honours at Oxford.— Morning Post. Birmingham Sunday, One o’Clock. Mr. Henry Mills, an under-graduate of Cambridge College, has just been publicly received into the Roman Catholic Chur...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE POTATOE DISEASE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

THE POTATOE DISEASE. The accounts of the crop in Ireland are gloomy. The rot is steadily advancing every where. In Sligo the people, unable to avert its progress in the pits, left their potatoes in the ground in hopes that they might be safe undug. The result is that in some districts, scarcely a potatoe has been left free from infection. Cloonoughill, Kilshalvey and Kilturra, are thus situated. The Rev. Mr. Henry, of Ballymore, adds:— “ The rents, with one or two exceptions, were collected with as much vigor as any previous year. One of our late cabinet and popular Whig ministers exacted two gales about a fortnight ago, from his tenants in this neighborhood, whose holdings range from two to five acres. This, too, though they represented by memorial to his lordship in London, that their potatoe crop was much infected with the disease, and prayed that he would receive at this trying time one gale from them, which would enable them to hold over part of their oats. The prayer was refus...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PROCEEDINGS OF CONGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

PROCEEDINGS OF CONGRESS. On Monday the Senate took up the bill for appropriating half a million to building war steamors, and other naval preparations. Mr. Mangum of North Carolina spoke with groat energy against the administration and the policy of war. He was met by Gen. Cass. On Tuesday p resolution of enquiry was adopted upon counterfeits of the coinage. A bill was read, and referred, providing a tax on the sale of public lands in Illinois. Col. Benton’s resolution of enquiry with respect to Mexican affairs was passed.— The resolutions from the House for giving the Oregon notice were introduced by Mr. French, read, and referred. After some disputing about what they had better do first, the Senators agreed to take up the Oregon resolutions. “ The original resolution of Mr. Allen, and the amendments, were accordingly taken up in their order, and read. 1. The original resolution, introduced by Mr. Allen, for causing the notice to annul and abrogate the convention of 1827, for the j...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A Little of Enery Thing. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

A Little of Enery Thing. The Illustrious Dead. The House of Representatives of Tennnesee have passed resolutions providing for the placing in the State House tsvo marble statues —one of Washington, the other of Jackson. They appropriated 15,000 dollars for the purpose. The Northampton Gazette says that counsel have been employed by the heirs of the late Oliver Smith (whose property to the amount of half a million dollars, the bulk of whichwas left to public institutions) to contest the will. Mr Murdoch has anew American five act play, which he will soon pioduce at the Philadelphia Walnut str’t Theatre.— I'ranscript. Somebody Hit. The Massachusetts Dew Drop says that the Directors of the Fall River Railroad have decided by a vote, that no ardent spirits shall he transported over their road. It will not do for them to convey some such as we have seen in this vicinity. —Bangor Whig. The Omnibus owners, in Philadelphia, are waging war with each other. What a quarrelsome place is the cit...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MOUNT HOPE HOSPITAL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

MOUNT HOPE HOSPITAL. A copy of the Annual Report of William B. Stokes, M.D., Physician to the above flourishing and truly benevolent institution, has been kindly furnished us. The report embraces the year ending 1345. It is a well written and liighly interesting document, evincing patient research and faithful attention to the duties which have devolved upon its author. The opportunities which Dr. S. has had in connection with this and other similar institutions, have enabled him to become, perhaps, more throughly conversant with the nature of insanity and the treatment of insane patients, than any other physician in the State. He has made it his especial study and practice; and from a close observance of the mysterious workings of disorganized minds, has rendered himself a true benefactor to his fellow men, in becoming able to restore the shattered intellect to its wonted equilibrium and original beauty. In former reports of this institution, it it was assumed by Dr. Stokes that ni...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MAKING PREPARATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

MAKING PREPARATIONS. The fortification bill passed the House on Tuesday of last week, making appropriations to the amount of thirteen hundred thousand dollars. The items in this hill are for works generally commenced, and New York comes in for her share of the benefits conferred. The following are among the items: For defensive works and barracks near Detroit, $30,000 For the same near Buffalo, 40,000 Barracks and storehouses at Fort Niagara, 5,000 Fortifications at the outlet of Lake Champlain, 45,000 Fort Trumbull, New London, 20,000 Fort Schuyler, East river, New York, 40,00fi Fort Wood und sea wall of Bedloe’s Island,, 40,000 Fort Hamilton, New York, 30.000 Fort Adams, Newport, K.. 1. 15,000 Fort Warren, Boston harbor, 45,000 Governor's Island, Boston harbor, 30,000 Fort JMcClary, Portsmouth, 6,000 Fort Scammel, Portland, 25,000 Fort Prattle, Portland, 10,000 Narrows of Penobscot river, near Bucksport, 33 000 These are the appropriations for New York, and the places east of New ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

I IKK, (t r.ALLAGER, HAST IIOSTON TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT. The subscribers respectfully inform their friends and the public, that they have commenced operations, with the inteutioii of transacting tlio Tailoring business in ull its branches. We have receive.i a well selected stock of Fashionable IJloths, Cassi.acres, Vesti.i,s, nod Furnishing Goods, Ac, to which we respectfully invite your attention. As our sloe* is enlirly new, and nought expressly for our Retail Custom Trade, it will enable us to sell at the lowest possible prices. CHARLES PIKE, Jan 3 JaMFS gallager. IV&11S J. AUSTIN Sc C. STARK NKVVElsls COUNSELLORS AND ATTORNEYS-AT C.v W, and ConuisstONEHs to take Depositions, Acknowledgments of Deeds, and other writings under Seal, and to administer oaths and amrmations, Ax., Ate., to be used and recorded in the Slates of New Hampshire, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. O.uce Nos. HA IO Gray’s Building, No. 30 Court St., 11 os ton. MR. EDWARD YOUNG may be fou...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

Notices of this kind inserted four times for $l. INFORMATION WANTED, Or JAMES TOOHY, formerly of Kilmurry, co. Cork, who came to America with his wife, Mary Tooliy (otherwise Corkery , about teu years ago, and left their only child there alter them. When last heard from they were in the State ofM tryland. Any information respecting them will he thankfully received by Juhannah Corkery, sister to the said Mary, addressed to her in care of Roche, brothers & Cos., No. 1 Spring Cane, Boston. H-bil t 4t Of Ei.I.EN BRADY. When last heard front, she was in the town of llawley, State ol'Massachusetts, about one year since. Any information respecting her will be gratefully received by her sister, Jane Brady, who now lives in New Orleans, l.a. Febl4 IT 4t JOiiN GORMAN, a native of County Tyrone, is requested to call at this ollice or write to us. Of MICHAEL COLMAN, formerly of Youghal, county Cork, who emigrated to America about nine years ago. When last heard from (about two years...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Congressional. MR. ADAMS’ SPEECH. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

Congressional. MR. ADAMS’ SPEECH. In the House of Representatives on Monday, February 9 th, on the Oregon Question. Mr. Adams had said before that he vvns ready to give to Great Britain the notice proposed by the Committee on Foreign Affairs; but he had not entered into all the reasons which had brought him to that conclusion. He had lieen willing to leave the balance of the debate with the committee, and to say ay to any one of the several propositions as to the form of giving notice of the termination of the convention—from the positive and unconditional declaration of the report of the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, down to the last and most timid of all the resolutions which had been before the committee. The more posiitve they were the better'they suited his mind. But, by way of compromise, and with a desire to show as strong a majority as possible on the final vote, he wonld consent to go for the least positive and most conciliatory of them all. He wanted to ter...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SENATE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

SENATE. Remarks of Gen. Cass on Monday, Feb. 9, on the Augmentation of the Navy — Relations of the United States and Great Britain. On motion, the Senate then proceeded to the consideration of the special order of the day—the bill reported by Mr. Fairfield from the committee on Naval Affairs, for the augmentation of the Navy of the United States, by the construction of ten additional steamships, and for other purposes, with the amendments offered thereto. Mr. Cass had but one word to say. It was in reply to the Senator from North Carolina. Alluding to measures which he (Mr. C.) had introduced, the Senator had remarked that no wise man— Mr. Mangum begged that the Senator would pardon him. lie had corrected the expression that no wise man could apprehend war. The Senator from Michigan was entirely out of his thoughts. He meant to say that no wise man could have apprehended that war wonld grow out of this question. Mr. Cass proceeded, and remarked that his desire -was to promote the in...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TROUBLE IN THE CAMP. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

TROUBLE IN THE CAMP. The Catholic Telegraph of February &th contains the following account of a “flare up” among our Protestant brethren in Cincinnati, Ohio:— Another Protestant Explosion. We hare heard with indescribable emotion, that the Taber • nacle at the corner of Seventh and John streets, has been closed for the present, owing to the difficulties which exist amongst the brethren regarding the right of possession to that interesting edifice. For some time, there has been an ardent controversy amongst the members, embracing several abstruse points of Scripture and theological lore, which the Bible, as usual, according to private interpretation, decided with great impartiality in favor of all the contending parlies! A prominent topic of discussion was the new or second birth, whose elucidation during the dispute,, elicited many origirial views, for which no precedents could be found in the books of the Scribes and Pharisees. All. parties agreed, however, that Protest...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LENT. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

LENT. THE PILOT. SATURDAY,FEBRUARY 91, 184«. We are authorized to state that the following is the regulation for the observance or Lent, this year, in the Dice'esa of Boston:— 1. The use of flesh meat is allowed on all Sundays throughout Lent, without restriction. 2. The same is allowed, once a day only, on ail Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. 3. Pish and flesh nre not to be used at the same meal. (. Eggs, butter, cheese and milk arc allowed in moderation at collation. S. Hogs lard may be used instead of butter in preparing food. S. All the faithful who have completed their twentytint year are, unless legitimately dispensed, bound to observe the fast of Lent. 7. The following persons are, however, exempted from the obligation of fasting: young persons under twenty-one years of age, the sick, pregnant women, or giving suck to infants, those who arc obliged to hard labor, all who through weakness cannot fast without prejudice to their health.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SPEECH OF J. Q. ADAMS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

SPEECH OF J. Q. ADAMS. We give Mr. Adams’ speech on the Oregon question in another page. It will be seen that he appeals to an authority not very much respected among politicians, namely, the authority of Almighty God. To most people, it has seemed rather bizarre and eccentric to supersede the treaties of high contracting powers in this way, by quoting two or three verses of Scripture. But the old man knows what he is about. To every one who has studied the Oregon question at all below the surface, it was evident that, let our claims by treaty and contract be what they will, our strongest, and best claim was founded on those two principles; that every nation has a right to cultivate, and people the wilderness; and that the inhalants of a country, no matter how or wnence colonized, have a right to choose their own government. The present state of our relations with Mexico, if Paredes shall stand, will bring our claim to both Texas and Oregon to that issue. Those eavesdroppers who scr...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE RESOURCES OF ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

THE RESOURCES OF ENGLAND. In the present doubtful state of foreign relations, it may be advisable to enquire where England’s strength lies, and where her weakness, and how she may be expected to act in case of war. She possesses a well disciplined army and an effective navy. The results of war in bringing both to the highest point of skill and regularity have not yet passed away, particularly as great solicitude has been shewn to preserve the effective condition of both. Besides the high discipline, and scrupulously select condition of her force, whatever advancing science has added to the art and enginery of war, she has made her own. For a few months, in the first year of war, she would probably be more than a match for any two powers upon the globe. If she withdrew her cruizers from coasts where they are watching against pirates and slavers, launched all her laid up vessels, and turned her mail-steamers into frigates, and her merchant ships into privateers, she could, as she did ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE NEW BRIGHTON TRAGEDY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

THE NEW BRIGHTON TRAGEDY. A story with the above heading, has been going through the papers this week. It details certain alledged villainies of one Medrano, who is said to have been a priest at Staten Island. Whether true or false, it is told in such a way as to cast reflections on Bishops Hughes andM’Closky, and even the Catholic community at New Brighton, such as we cannot easily credit. We hope our New-York cotemporaries will throw some light on it. I Earl House, No. 69 North Maine street, Providence, R. /. This house has recently come into the hands of that excellent caterer, Robert Earl, Esq. It has been fitted up in the finest style and is one of the best conducted houses in the country. When any of our friends are going to Providence, we would recommend them to put up at this house, where they will be sure of good accommodations and polite and gentlemanly attention. W3”Fourteen hundred and ten dollars, and eighty-eight cents, was the proceeds of the Ball, given at Castle Gar...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence. A WORD FOR THE BREAD-LAW REFORMERS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 February 1846

Correspondence. A WORD FOR THE BREAD-LAW REFORMERS. To the Editor of the Pilot :— Sir, —l have read your journal for y„*ars, and have uniformly borne rny commendation (perhaps you will say “ Tut,” but never mind) to its direct and manly course on all subjects, where the food, the blood, or the Souls of the “ millions” were at stake. If as a journalist, you have any character at all, Sir, it is for that “openarmedness” with which you have embraced every progressive movement, for the amelioration and elevation of the condition of the masses. The tone of your press, has been as one of the Chimes of Modern progress, ringing out to the people , and mingling with the clink of the hammer, the heavy roll of the mill, and the daily toils of the “ worn workers” on God’s earth. Such was your mission,—less would have ship-wrecked you,—amid the breakers of prejudice, and the suggestions of malice, and more, it is creditable to you to have it said, could not have been done. But “ Odds bobs,” Sir,...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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