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Elephind.com contains 5,782 items from Staunton Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 22 January 1861

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS* A PPOINTMENT OF COMMISSIONERS J\. AND OFFICERS OF ELECTION.— Porauant to an act of the General Assembly of Virginia, eutitled "An act to provide for electing members of a Convention, and to convene the same, passed 14tn January, 1861—the following named commissioners and officers are, by said act, required to hold and conduct the said election for members to said Convention -at the Court-house and other places of voting in the county of Augusta, on Monday, the 4th day of February, 1861, to wit: _ M At the Court Bouse, Ao. 1.-Joseph Smith, FM Youne, Thornton Berry, Henry Harrison and Col W P Tate Commissioners, and G A Armentrout, Officer. District No. 2—W W Donaghe, John Trimble, A J Garber, Judson McCoy and W H Blanker, Commissioners, and R W Stevenson, Officer. Middlebrook.—W R Dunlap, S X Kerr, William Thompson, JAG Scott and Elijah Hogshead, Commissioners, and W H Bell, Officer. CraigsviUe.— David Kunkle, Robert Young, Luke Woodward, R S Craig and John Lockri...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 22 January 1861

MISCEIJANEOUS. The Amalgamation of is a growing tendency in this age to appropriate the most l expressive words of other languages, and after a while to incorporate them into our own; thus the word > Cephalic, which is freon the Greek, signifying "for ( the head," is now becoming popularized in connection with Mr. Spalding's great >Headache remedy, but it will soon be u9ed in a more general way, and the word Cephalic will become as common as Electrotype and many others whose distinction as foreign woids . has been worn away by common usage until they ■ seem "native and to the manor born." O 'ardly Realized. 1 Hi "ad *n 'orrible 'eadache this haflernoon, hand I stepped into the hapothecaries hand says hi to the man . "Can you hease me of han 'eadaehe ?" "Does it hache 'ard?''savs c. "Hexceedingly," says hi, hand upon that 'c gave vie a Cephalic Pill, hand me 'onor it cured me so quick that hi 'ardly realized hi 'ad han ( eadache. 0 |gj£~ Headache is the favorite...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 29 January 1861

VOL. XXXVIII. RICHARD MAUZY, Editor & Proprietor. TERMS. _W Ihe "Spbctator" is published once a week, at Ivo Dollars and Fifty Cents a year, which may be discharged by the payment of Two Hollars at any time » teithin the year. No subscription will be discontinued but at the option of th* Editor, until all arrearages are paid. Am) VERTISEMENTS of ten lines {or less) inserted •race for one dollar, and twenty-five cents for each subse-fj&n-t continuance. Larger advertisements inserted in me same proportion. A liberal discount made to those who advertise by the year. CSF" Annual advertisers will be limited to their immediate business, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. Professional Cards, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one year for $7 00—6 months for $4 00. One Square, (10 lines) .. 1 year $10 00 " " Ct months 6 00 " " 3 " 400 Vwo Squares,.... 1 year 15 00 " " 10 00 " " 3 " 600 Three Squarbs, 1 year 18 00 " " 6 months 12 00 " m " 3...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 29 January 1861

Staunton Spectator* STAUNTON, VA. TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1861. py The Staunton Spectator having as large a circulation as any paper published in Western Virginia, has no superior in this section of country as an advertising medium. The Dangers of Extremes. The dangers of the present time consist chiefly in the fact that extremists in both sections ofthe country have been entrusted with powers which they pervert to the wicked purpose of exciting and inflaming the public mind, instead of giving it quietude and respose. Tbey add fuel to the fires of sectional animosity, and furnish liberal contributions to the hell-broth which boils in the bubbling caldron of public opinion, and, like the witches in Macbeth, sing gleefully in chorus: "Double, double toil and trouble, Fire burn and caldron bubble." With false professions of patriotism on their lips, and hypocritical pretensions for the rights of the people, they throw into the caldron their contributions of poisonous components worse than...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 29 January 1861

The Hon. Millard Fillmore was, a few weeks ago, suggested by a Union meeting in New York' a« a >uita'ile .er-.>n to g<> to S.>.i ; h G_">liiia to] tender ne people <.f .hat Swu the a-v-uiar.ce ot j tire oittxeto ■>• Ne* Y>rk hat the North wi>ul . _c.-p.-o. and uphold tlie constitutional rights ot the S »utb. This mission Mr. Fiilmore declined, and in his letter remarked: What they want, and wbat 1 want, is some assurance from the Republican party, now doiniuant at the North, that they, or at least the conservative portion of tbem, are ready aud willing to come forward and repeal all unconstitutional State laws: live up to the com prom; ..<__ of t'te Oonsti v ion, execute the laws of C--tigress honestly aud taithfuily, aud treat our Southern brethren as friends. When 1 can have any ouch reliable assurance as this to give, I will go most cheerfully and urge our Sout...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 29 January 1861

MI SCELL | The Amalgamation or Languages.—There is a growing tendency in this age to appropriate the mosk expressive words of other languages, and after a while to incorporate them into our own; thus the word Cephalic, which is from the Greek, signifying "for the head," is now becoming popularized in connection with Mr. Spalding's great Headache but it will soon be used in a more general way, and the word Cephalic will become as common as Electrotype and many others whose distinction as foreign wo.ds has been worn away by common usage until they seem "native and to the manor born." 'ardly Realized. Hi 'ad 'n 'orrible 'eadache this hafternoon ; hand 1 stepped into the hapothecaries hand says hi to the man •'Can you hease me of han 'eadaehe ?" "Doesithache 'ard? ,r says 'c. "Hexceedingly," says hi, hand upon that 'c gave me a Cephalic Pill, hand Yon me 'onor it oured me so quick that hi 'ardly realized hi 'ad han eadache■ O Jggr - Headache is the favorite sign by which nature makes kn...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 5 February 1861

VOL. XXXVIII. RICHARD MAUZY, Editor & Proprietor. TERMS. _3?~ The "Spectator" is published once a week, at Two Dollars and Fifty Cents a year, which may be discharged by the payment of Theo Dollars at any time within the year. No subscription will be discontinued but at the option ef th* Editor, until all arrearages are paid. A J VERTISEMENTS of ten lines {or less) inserted once for one dollar, and twenty-five cents for each subsequent continuance. Larger advertisements inserted in the same proportion. A liberal discount made to those who advertise by the year. Annual advertisers wUI be limited to their immediate business, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. Pro fuss ion a l Caeds, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one year for $7 00 —6 months for $4 00. One Square, (lo lines) .. 1 year $1.0 00 " " dmonths 6 00 " " 3 « 400 Vwo Squares, 1 year 15 00 " " 6 months 10 00 " " 3 " 600 Three Squares, I year 18 00 " » 6 months 12 00 " " 3 " 800 One-Th...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 5 February 1861

Staunton %\tt\i\u. , STAUNTON, VA. \ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1861. py Tlie Staunton Spectator having as large a circulation as any paper published in Western Virginia, has no ' superior in this section of country as an ' advertising medium. Why They Wish Virginia to Secede. ' We took occasion several weeks since to warn i the people against the plausible pretext which the Disunionists were urging for inducing Vir- ' ginia to secede from the Union. They claim ' w that they are the only true friends of the Union, and that they wish Virginia to secede that she ' and the other secediug States may the more ef- ! factually re construct the broken Union. We ' warned the people to be on their guard against ! thiskindofdisunioni_.nl in disguise, and told them that if Virginia will ever go out, that she •will never get back. The disunionists themselves are now furnishing corroboration of the truth of the position taken by us—they furnish "confirmation strong as proof of holy writ" that we have b...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 5 February 1861

Mt. Sidney, Feb. 2,1861. Mr. Editor: —lv these times, when so numy of our public men seem to have forgotten, in their base and selfish struggles for self advancement, the interest ot their country, we note with special pride, the course pursued by au eminent and talented County-mau, H. W. Sheffey, Esq., and appreciate most highly the motives that has actuated him iv this selt-sacriticiug and patriotic act. By his actio.i in this matter, Mr. Sheftey has exhibited i-uch laudable patriotism, aud has evinced so much z*al for the advancement of the principles ot his party, that he has ninde himself an exaniplar worthy of tho imitation ot those who enjoy the trust and confidence ot their fellow-citizens. He certainly had the fullest assurance that the people of Augusta, would recognize his claims to a seat in the convention. Why then sacrifice the most coveted, honor within the gift of the people? It wa* to give aoaaiantj ti» tin: U"i'»M vote ot Augu.-ta, that her Etepremntativißß might h...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 5 February 1861

Thk Amalgamation of Languages.—There isi» growing tendency in this age to the most x expressive words of other languages, and after a while to incorporate them into our own; thus the word Cephalic, which is from the Greek, signifying "tor j the head," is now becoming populanzedm connection 1 with Mr. Spalding's great Headache remedy, but it will soon be used in a more general way and the word Cephalic will become as common as Electrotype . and many others whose distinction as has been" worn away by common usage until they ; seem "native and to the manor born. j 'ardly Realized. Hi 'ad 'n 'oniole 'eadache this hafternoon, hand I stepped into the hapothecaries hand says hi to the man «'Can youheasemeothan' eadaehe ?" " Does 11 hache 'ard r says 'c. "Hexceedingly," says hi, hand upon that 'c gave me a Cephalic Pill, hand *pon me onor it oured me so quick that hi 'ardly realized hi ad han 0 U_r Headache is the favorite sign by which nature makes known any deviation whatever from the nat...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 12 February 1861

VOL, XXXVIII. RICHARD MAIZY, Editor* Proprietor. TERMS. HP" 7he "Spectator" is published once a week, at Two Dollars and Fifty Cents a year, which may be discharged by the payment of Two Dollars at any time j. within the year. " No subscription trill be discontinued but at the option of th* Edito . wtiil ail arrearages are paid. A J VERTISEMESTS of ten Unas (or less) inserted \ once for one dollar, and twenty-five cents for each subse- \ qtuent continuance. Larger advertisements inserted in The same proportion. A liberal discount made to those who advertise, by the year. 53P Annual advertisers w ill 6e limited to their immediate business, or the advertisements charged for" at transient rates. Professional Cards, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one year for $7 00— 6 months for f 4 00. One Square, (\olmes) ..1 yea* $1000 " " 6 months 6 00 " <« 3 •« 400 Ywo Squares, 1 year 15 00 " •• 10 00 « » y,a «• 600 Three Squares, \ year 18 00 ■ ** 6 months.. 12 00 On»*Third...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 12 February 1861

Staunton J&pctator. STAUNTON, VA. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12,1861. Position and Trials of Conservatives. In times of great sectional excitement how noble and grandly sublime is the position of the patriotic and horoic conservative who, discarding all sectional prejudices, embraces the whole country in the loving clasp of his affections, and who pursues with bold and manly step the "even tenor of his way,'' unseduced by flattery and unawed by opposition. His position is one which "tries the souls of men," and which requires a good degree of moral firmness to main, tain it with fidelity and persistency. He is a mariner who, taking the Constitution as his chart and the Union as his polar star, tries to direct the ship of Slate in the middle way of safety between the rocks of Scylla on the one hand, and the whirlpool of Charybdis on the other. He keeps the prow of the noble vessel directed straight towards the haven of peace, though the hot sirocco blast of secession beat upon it ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 12 February 1861

Remarks of Hon. Jno. T. Harris. On the 6th inst., the Eepresentative from this District made a few very sensible and seasonable remarks. As we find them reported, they were as follows: Mr. Harris, of Virginia, addressed the House. He said that many questions of grave consideration, and a variety of items for fruitful speculation, present themselves to the observer of current events. Issues which are involved would not only affect the present, but their consequences will reach far into the future generations, and determine for weal or woe, the destiny of Republican Institutions. Under such circumstances, and in view of such consequences, he conceived it to be the part of wisdom, as well as the command of duty, for every member of that body in the charge of his representative \ trust, to do all in his power to avert the calamity which now threatens our commou country. The Republicans had the power now, if they would come for ward, and not only prevent further ruptnre, but bring back t...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 12 February 1861

MISCELLANEOUS^^ The Amalgamation or Languages.—There is a growing tendency in this age to appropriate the most ; expressive words of other languages, and after a while to incorporate them into our own; thus the word Cephalic, which is from the Greek, signifying "for | the head," is now becoming popularized in connection with Mr. Spalding's great Headache remedy, but it wilt soon be used in a more general way, and the word Cephalic will become as common as Electrotype and-many others whose distinction as foreign words has been worn away by common usage until they seem "native and to the manor born." 0 'ardly Realized. Hi 'ad 'n 'orrible 'eadache this hafternoon, hand I stepped into the hapothecaries hand says hi to the man "Can you hease me ot ban 'eadaehe ?" "Does it hacbe 'ard?" says 'c. "-exceedingly," says hi, hand upon that 'c gave me a Cephalic Pill, hand Yon me 'onor it cured me so quick that hi 'ardly realized hi 'ad han 0 Headache is the favorite sign by which nature makes k...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 19 February 1861

VOL. XXXVIII. RICHARII JIAI'ZV. Editor _ Proprietor. TERMS. E_F~ Ihe "Spectator" is published once a week, ai Two Dcliars and Fifty Cents a year, which may be discharged by the payment of Two Dollars at any time within the year. No subscription wiU be discontinued but at the opnon of the Editor, until all arrearages are paid. AD VERTISEMENTS of ten lines (or less) inserted once for one dollar, and twenty-five cents for each subsequent continuance. Larger advertisements inserted in the same proportion. A liberal discount made to those wlto advertise by the year. . . t3f~ Annual advertisers will be limited to their immediate business, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. Professional Cabds, not exceeding seven lines, wiU be inserted one year for $7 00—6 months for $4 00. One Squash, (10 lines) . . 1 year $10 00 " 6 00 «" 3 " 400 Two Squares,.... I year 15 00 " •• 6 months 10 00 " " 3 " 600 Three Squares, I year 18 00 - 12 00 " •« | " 800 ©ne__i_o Column, 1 year 26 00 ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 19 February 1861

STAUNTON, VA. TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 19,1861. < The Allies of Black Republicans. There are some persons who do not hesitate to charge those who are friends of the Union with being Black Republicans, even though tbe Union men thus slandered may be the owners of slaves and the best friends of Southern institutions. Those who make such charges must do it through ignorance, malice, or a purpose to give "aid and comfort" to the enemies of the South. Those who are ignorant of the sentiments entertained by Union men, should not presume to speak ot them in a disparaging manner, for they thereby only bring shame and ridicule upon themselves. Those who are prompted by a fiendish spirit of malice to slander the friends of the Union, will find that their motives will be appreciated as they deserve by all intelligent and well meaning members of the community in which they live, and will become objects of contempt, to be ehunfied, despised and loathed by all persons of respectability. The m...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 19 February 1861

The Reason of the Change. Before the election for members of the State Convention the secessionists denounced those who were opposed to their policy of precipitating Virginia out of the Union as base submissionists. But since they have been defeated by an overwhelming majority, and have received such a severe rebuke at the hands of the pepple, a change seems to have come o'er tbe spirit of their dreams, and they now say that the people have chosen the right kind of representatives.— We hear nothing more of submissionists —the secessionists seem to have erased that word from their vocabulary. The secessionists, however, flocked to Richmond, and were particularly kind and gracious to those whom they had, during the with being submissionists and quasi Black Republicans. In speaking of their conduct in this respect the Richmond Whig says: "We think we have discovered the cat in the meal tub, in regard to some of these Precipitating gentlemen, at least. W e notice that a goodly number of...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 19 February 1861

MISCELLANJIOUS. Th_ Amalgamation or LANGDAG_s.—There is a growing tendency in this age to appropriate the most expressive words of other languages, and altera while to incorporate them into our own; thus the word Cephalic, which is from the Greek, signifying "for the head," is now becoming popularized in connection with Mr. Spalding's great Headache remedy, but it will soon be used in a more general way, and the word Cephalic will become as common as Electrotype and many others whose distinction as foreign word* has been worn away by common usage until they seem "native and to the manor born." O 'ardly Realized. Hi 'ad 'n 'orrible 'eadache this hafternoon, hand I stepped into the hapothecaries hand says hi to the man "Can you hease me ot ban 'eadaehe r" "Does it-ache 'ard ? says 'c. "-exceedingly," says hi, hand upon that 'c gave me a Cephalic Pill, hand 'pon me 'onor it cured me so quick that hi 'ardly realized hi 'ad han 0 Headache is the favorite sign by which nature makes known ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 26 February 1861

VOL. XXXVIII. Staunton _.settaior. RICHARD MAIZY, Editor _ Proprietor. TERMS. ___"" Ihe "Spectator" is published once a week, at Two Dollars and Fifty Cents a year, which may be discharged by the payment of Two Dollars at any time within the year. No subscription will be discontinued but at the option ofth' Eli to , until all arrearages arc paid. AD VEtiTISEMEXTS of ten lines {or less) inserted once fijr one dollar, and twenty-jive cents for each subsequfii continuance. Larger advertisements inserted in the same prop>>ruon. A liberal discount made to those who advertise by the <_*_ . . . t_F" Annual advertisers will be limited to their immediate business, or the advertisements charged for at transient rates. Professional Cards, not exceeding seven lines, will be inserted one year for $7 00—6 months for $4 00. OneSquare,(lo lines) ..1 year $10 ■>. " " dmonths 6 00 " " 3 " 400 Two Squares, 1 year 15 00 ■ " H months 1000 " " | _ 600 Three Squ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Staunton Spectator — 26 February 1861

_S.atttt.on %ettator. STAUNTOK.VA^^ TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 26,1861. The 22nd in Staunton. Friday last, the 22ud of February, the 129 th anniversary of the birth of the "Father of his Country," was appropriately celebrated here by the excellent Military Companies of this place— the "West Augusta Guard," Capt. Wm. S. H. Baylor, and the "Staunton Artillery," Captain John D. Imboden. These companies were formed in order and marched with regular military step to the "music of the Union," discoursed by Turner's Cornet Band, through the principal streets of the towt>, exciting the admiration of all beholders. We never see these excellent companies, composed as they are of as good material as ever marched with martial Tread, that we do not feel proud of them, and regret that there is a probability that they may be made food for powder. They are worthy, good and useful citizens, and should be reserved for a better fate, than to be made targets tor tbe gune of our enemies. We know that ...

Publication Title: Staunton Spectator
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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