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Elephind.com contains 891,773 items from Columbia Missourian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

Thanks to the miracle of modern photo-offset (lithography), we again bring you a page from the University Missourian of nearly 60 years ago. Among other interesting items in this issue, Columbians read (see column 3) of the East St. Louis pastor, who was ousted from his job because he sermonized against “young ladies wearing short sleeves.”

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Damper on Class Rush by Dr. Hill [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

DAMPER ON CLASS RUSH BY DR. HILL President Says Annual Fight is “Not Befitting of Gentlemen.” WILL CONFER WITH MARSHALS Event Postponed Until Friday Evening Officials Are Chosen. FACTS ABOUT CLASS RUSH Postponed until Friday evening. About 400 men to take part. President Hill says it is “unbefitting gentlemen, and has no sanction from University officials. Iron light pole at north end of campus to be center of fight. President A. Ross Hill threw a bomb into the University Assembly this morning when in the discussion of student activities, he said the “class rush,” set for tomorrow evening is not “befitting gentlemen,” and pointed out that the University has given to it no official sanction. The use of the buildings and grounds have not been granted to the students, Dr. Hill said. Cautioning the men taking part in the rush against anything that might damage the reputation of the University, Dr. Hill urged that they take precautions against any physical injuries. He will confer today ...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Overzealous Not Criminal,' Asserts John D. of Standard [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

“OVERZEALOUS, NOT CRIMINAL,” ASSERTS JOHN D. OF STANDARD Rockefeller, in First Chapters of Memoirs, Declares He Expects Justice From Posterity. By United Press. NEW YORK, Sept. 24. John D. Rockefeller, in the first chapters of his memoirs made public here today, admits that Standard Oil may have made mistakes through overzealousness on the part of some of its employees, but denies that the corporation ever engaged in any criminal practice. The memoirs aroused keen interest in business circles here. Mr. Rockefeller, prefacing his remarks, says that he expects justice from posterity and wants to put some matters in their proper light. Denies Crushing Competition. Though some of the company's employees may have made mistakes, Mr. Rockefeller does not think the corporation should be condemned for these instances. He denies that Standard Oil has crushed competitors or forced men to become partners with it in the oil business. Standard Oil has hundreds of wide-awake competitors, he says. ...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Crowd Trails after Mrs. Jack Gardner in Her Sheath Gown [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

CROWD TRAILS AFTER MRS. JACK GARDNER IN HER SHEATH GOWN In Flesh-Colored Silk Hose Society Woman Parades in Staid Boston. BOSTON, Sept. 21. Mrs. Jack Gardner, society woman, art collector and leader of the smart set, who only a few weeks ago was involved in an attempt to smuggle some $60,000 worth of art objects into the country, created a sensation in sedate Boston by promenading down the exclusive Copeley square sec- section of the city clothed in an ultra daring sheath gown that opened clear to the knee. Mrs. Gardner wore flesh colored silk stockings. A crowd that grew to several hundred followed her until she appealed to a policeman. He got a cab for her and she went home. COLLARWILTERS OUT IN FORCE NOW, BUT IT WILL RAIN TOMORROW Forecaster Issues Bulletin Which May Make Umbrellas Popular Again. The United Order of Collarwilters turned out in large force today and paraded the streets. This is no unusual sight, for the order became firmly established in Columbia during the hot we...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Roosevelt Makes Attack on Haskell [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

ROOSEVELT MAKES ATTACH ON HASKELL In 3000-Word Message, the President Scores Governor of Oklahoma. PERSONAL ASSAULT ON BRYAN Asks Democratic Leader to Contrast His Action With That of Taft. WASHINGTON, Sept. 24. President Roosevelt, in a statement 3,000 words long, today voices an entirely new set of charges against Gov. Haskell. It is a typical Roosevelt document. “Now contrast your actions in this case of Governor Haskell,” says the President, “with Mr. Taft’s action as regards Senator Foraker, as set forth in his letter of July 20, 1907, which I quoted in my statement.” According to the President, this letter was submitted to him a year ago and then mailed. There is nothing on record from Mr. Taft to show that he wrote it nor is the testimony given of anyone who received it. It now bobs up in the President’s files, ready to exculpate Taft after a Foraker compact had been made in Ohio to help carry the State, a compact broken only when the Archbold letters transformed Foraker from...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Oxygen Reviver for Iowa Team [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

OXYGEN REVIVER FOR IOWA TEAM Coach Catlin Will Need It, Monilaw’s Admirers Here Declare. TIGERS HAVE ONLY FIFTY PLAYS Opposing Men Will Have 237, and Will Try to Spring Them All. It’s Catlin against Monilaw when Iowa mets Missouri on Rollins Field next month. Catlin, head coach of the Hawkeyes, boasts of 237 different plays he expects to drill his men in, while the Tiger coach said this morning that he expected to have only about fifty plays ready for the Iowa game, but that all of those would be good ones and well mastered by mid-October. Catlin believes in new-fangled things, and will experiment with oxygen, as a reviver and stimulant for his men. He expects to try this experiment in the game Iowa plays with the Alumni Oct. 10. The results will be watched all over the country. But if the Tigers do what is expected of them, Catlin will need a tank of oxygen, else some of his 237 plays might, through the aid of Bluck et al., fail for want of energy and direction. Some Area Off Feed....

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

He's sure of place as Tigers' end man W. Lloyd Driver.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Class Hush Atop 3-Story Building [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

CLASS RUSH ATOP STORY 3-BUILDING St. Louis “Medics” Battle Until Members of Faculty Stop Them. By United Press. ST. LOUIS, Sep. 24. One hundred students of the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons engaged in a class fight on the roof of the three-story building this morning. The Freshmen raised their flag on the roof of the building in retaliation for the hazing of one of their members. The Sophomores stormed the roof and tried to capture the banner. Many students narrowly escaped being hurled to the street fifty feet below. The appearance of the faculty ended the fight without serious injury to members of either class, but with the Freshmen victorious. DOG TRIES IN VAIN TO PREVENT SUICIDE Dies After Pulling Tube From Man Inhaling Gas. Bridgeport, Conn., Sept. 24. Peter Schread, a prominent member of the Park City Yacht Club, of this city killed himself in his room, at No. 189 Cedar street, in spite of the efforts of a pet cocker spaniel to save his life. Schread attached a ...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Train Leaps off Bridge at Curve; Two Are Drowned [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 10 March 1909

TRAIN LEAPS OFF BRIDGE AT CURVE; TWO ARE DROWNED Many Injured When Frisco Locomotive and Coaches Plunge Into Spring River Near Carthage, Mo. ENGINEER AND FIREMAN ARE PINIONED UNDER THEIR CAB Women Aided in Struggle From Shallow Stream to Safety on Banks. By United Press. CARTHAGE, Mo., Sept. 24. Two trainmen were drowned and fifty passengers are reported to have been injured near hear early this morning when a Frisco passenger train left the rails on a sharp curve and plunged into Spring river. The train was running at high speed and the plunge from the bridge was without warning. Neither engineer nor fireman had time to jump and both were carried down into the water with the cab. Entire Train into River. The entire train, of passenger and baggage coaches, was pulled into the water when the engine jumped from the rails and careened over the side of the bridge. None of the passengers in the crowded coaches had time to escape. All were piled in a heap when cars went into the water. Th...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

Missourian Wednesday, March 10, 1909, Number 105

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Blackboards Are Menace to Health [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

BLACKBOARDS ARE MENACE TO HEALTH Dr. W. McN. Miller Tells of Harm Done by Chalk Dust in Class Rooms. CHARCOAL A SUBSTITUTE Students and Faculty Should Be Protected by Using Paper Tablets. Blackboards in the lecture room should be discarded and large tablets of paper should be installed in their places to protect the health of the students and faculty, is the opinion of Prof. Walter McNab Miller, professor of pathology and bacteriology in the University of Missouri. “I am in favor,” said Prof. Miller yesterday, “of abolishing the blackboards. The rooms in Academic hall and other buildings are crowded and are poorly ventilated. In addition to this the chalk-dust is just as unhealthy as any other kind of dust, and its inhalation predisposes to pulmonary tuberculosis, or consumption. “I know of no better way of avoiding this dust than to substitute in place of the blackboards large tablets of paper, the sheets of these tablets may be torn off and burned. To avoid the injurious dust whic...

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
College Girls in Men's Roles [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

COLLEGE GIRLS IN MEN’S ROLES Young Women Will Appear as Army Officers in “The Heart’s Garden.” The dramatic club of Stephens College will present “The Heart’s Garden,” an English drama of the time of the wars with Napoleon, at the college auditorium Monday evening. Miss Alice Washington will have the part of the leading man, Captain Granville Howard, and Miss Winnie Denny will be the leading woman. They will be supported by the following cast: Misses May Day Clark, Mabel Cox, Mabel Couch, Elizabeth Hertig, as officers in the English army; Komora Cheshier, Lucinda Templin, Gladys Fisher, Florence Gohlke, Bertha Bleish, in the women’s parts and Frances Bell Walker, Mary Badgett, Frances Bayless and Aldeah Wise, as children.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Unruly Plant Wouldn't Sleep [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

UNRULY PLANT WOULDN’T SLEEP Dr. W. L. Howard Accidently Finds a Way to Force Blossoms. While trying to put plants to sleep by anesthetics, Dr. W. L. Howard at the Department of Horticulture at the University of Missouri, found that they awaken quickly afterward and are livelier than ever. Recently Dr. Howard placed a slip cut from the golden bell in a large jar with ether. After the plant had absorbed the ether twenty-four hours, the slip was taken out and the stem placed in water. Instead of sleep for weeks as he expected, the plant began to bloom. The discovery, Dr. Howard says, is useful in forcing plants to blossom in the greenhouse when blooms are scarce and high priced.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Salome Dance at Chicago U [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

SALOME DANCE AT CHICAGO U. Co-eds See “Artistic” Performance at the D. K. E. House. CHICAGO, March 10. There is much speculation in Chicago University as to whether the faculty will take any action regarding a Salome dance which was staged recently by the fraternity men at the Delta Kappa Epsilon house. Pliny Munger, Jr., was “Salome,” and, while he writhed and wiggled through the “artistic” dance, a score of co-eds, perched on boxes outside the window, giggled at the performance. The university is considerably wrought up over the performance and it has been suggested that Pliny repeat the performance before the faculty in order to show that it is well within the bounds of “art,” as expounded by Gertrude Hoffmann and other Salomers.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Searching the Ruins at Brinkley [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

Searching the Ruins at Brinkley By United Press. BRINKLEY, Ark., March 10. Soldiers today took charge of the situation at Brinkley, which was swept by a tornado Monday. The work of clearing the streets has begun. A systematic search of the ruins for the dead will be made.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Vessels Collide in Fog [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

Vessels Collide in Fog. NEW YORK, March 10. The coast wise liner Horatio Hall plying between New York and Portland, was in collision off Newport today with an unknown vessel. Owing to the thick fog, no details of the accident have been received.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Animals' Home on University Campus [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

ANIMALS’ HOME ON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS THE THIRD ANIMAL HOSPITAL M. U. is One of the First Schools to Build Such a Structure. The University of Missouri’s now $3,000 animals hospital, a place for experimental work on animals by the students in the Department of Medicine, is the third building of its kind erected by a university. Johns Hopkins has such a hospital and the other is at the University of Pennsylvania. All of the equipment has not yet been placed in the building and only a few animals have been received. The building is of brick. The ground floor will be used for cats and dogs. On the second floor guinea pigs, mice and smaller animals will be kept. In the loft there will be pigeons and fowls. The building is heated by steam, lighted by electricity and has hot and cold water service.

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
Cold in Columbia Tonight [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Missourian — 29 March 1909

COLD IN COLUMBIA TONIGHT Tomorrow It Is to Be Cloudy, the Observer Says. The weather forecast for today says it will be fair and colder tonight. Tomorrow it is to be partly cloudy and colder. The temperature for today follows: 7 a. m. 32 8 a. m. 34 9 a. m. 36 10 a. m. 37 11 a. m. 40 12 p. m. 40 1 p. m. 40 2 p. m. 41

Publication Title: Columbia Missourian
Source: University of Missouri School of Journalism [Missouri Digital Heritage]
Country/State of Publication: Missouri, United States
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