ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Gippsland Mercury Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 32,835 items from Gippsland Mercury, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
32,835 results
In Reserve. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

In Reserve. At a Highland gat?ciing one Donald MacLean had entered for a number of events. The first of these was a quar ter-mile. Of cight runners he was last. "Donald, Donald," cried a partisan. "why did ye no run faster ? Donald sneered. "Run faster?" he said contemptuously. "An' me reser vin' myself for :..e bagpipe competi tion .' A 3Mr. Smoker, of New Jersey, has been hiccoughing for a fortnight. He must feel very ?-hie of it by this time. Twenty-six sovereigns were found in a crocodile shot in Swaziland.- There is more money in big game than we thought,,

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
[?]OR THE FARMER. FARMYARD MANURE. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

RB THE FARMER, FARMYARD MANURE. Farmyard manure consists of the solid and liquid excrements of ani mals and the litter with which these substances are mixed and absorbed. Its value for fertilising purposes de pend; to a great extent upon the way in which it is handled in the dung stead. In this respect (says a writer in an English farm journal) its man agement too often leaves much to be desired, and, taking -the country all through, enormous quantities of valu able plant nourishment are lost. The atmosphere is the chief agent which produces the decomposition of the animonia in the manure and causes it to escape, and therefore the air must be shut out of the manure heap as much as possible. The freer the air can penetrate the heap the more rapid is the decomposition and consequent loss of ammonia; indeed, it may be said that a rational treat ment of the manure does not exist un less the heap is tightly compacted. "Keep it moist and tread it tight. And it will well your care re quite...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COLIC DRENCH FOR HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

COLIC DRENCH FOR HORSES. Almost every veterinary surgeon has his own special formula for colic drench, and thus the contents of the bottle varies according to the ideas of the prescriber, and, to some extent at least, according to what he conceives to be the requirements of the case. If you want a formula for a colic drink to keep by you for use in emergencies, the following will be suitable:-Tinc ture of opium, 1 ounce; oil of turpen tine, 2 ounces; linseed oil, to 1 pint. Give this as it is, followed by a little warm gruel. Walk the horse about to prevent his rolling, rub the belly with a wisp, and, if necessary. re peat the drench in two hours, but not more than two doses should be given. Understand that it is not claimed that this recipe is better than any other. It may not even be the most suitable under all circumstances, but it is in expensive, easily procured, will keep good for any length of time if properly coried and sealed, and often cuts short an attack in its initial s...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARVELLOUS BIRDS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

MARVELLOUS BIRDS. '"-paking. of hens," said an America3iP trave!!er, "reiminds me of an old hei. my dad had on a farm in Dakota. Sht would hatlh out. anything from a ten nis-ball to a. lemon. Why, oreo day Asa. i-at on a piect of ike and hatchdi0 ou, two quarts of hot. wate-r!" 'That, doen't. comi., up to a club fiotted hen my old mother once had,'" said one of hli hcarers. "They haZ beon feedinw her by miotuiak <n saw dustC insteaa of oatmial. Well, sl. laid twelvo eg4's rnl iat on them. a:as when thoy wero hatche:odl cloven of Ztho ohickoerI had wood':n loTs and thes twelfth 'wa-s a wo'~dIpockr I"

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IMPRISONED IN A GLACIER. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

IMPRISONED IN A GLACIER. Some thrilling, experiences once ble. fell Mr. Frederick Chamberlin whilst he was eaploring the Allp. In the "Wide World Magazine" Ihe writes of arE adventure that befell him o,: the after noon of a September day -when he wnVr descending the snow slope of a moun- tain: Suddenly I found myself in front of a particularly nasty serae, or ice-rid-,e, that gave very little foothold. 'The surface was not brokln and crlumbly, but just smooth, treacherous ice. how ever, I was not going to be d:aunted, t I wormed mny way up, anrl was about. to descend the other side, when with out -sarning imy feet sthrt from under me, aln I started careering down the slope at break-neck speedo. wD:o-n I slid, straight through a funnel-shaped hole into a partly-fonnedl crevasse. I brought op sharply against : small bar of ice that only .lust preve-nt,_l? me frol; continuing my headlong , arerc into s, gaping chasm below. "For a few seconds I l~yi half-ttunned, then I carefully geo on...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HATCHING OF CROCODILES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

THE HATCHING OF CROCODILES. An audible croaking cry is ittered by yuag n unhiathel d ctoi'odiths wheti they are withinl the c?gg iii ,xhich they are laid, and the cry is so loutld and dis tinct that. it can ho hleard whel1 the elgs are buried in salnd. [)ceor W. A Lamblorn has cecently tested the fact at Lagos. lie heard a Creakiug ices. frim below a dry path. and, digging in the path to investigate the cause, hn die\O'ered thirteen crocodriles' egs at a depth of abtlouit e-ghttee nchlies. Axll the young crec?'dles hatched anut after hbeing du u ip.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Man Who Dodged Work. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

The "Man who Dodged Work. By Charles Phelps Cushing. in the "Argonaut." It's frightfully hard to make some persons understand that when one of literature's vagrants has money enough to last him into the middle of Janu ary he continues to he rich until he's poor again. When I'm poor I chase work, take on any sort of hack writing. from interviews to encyclopaedias,, but when I'm rich I dodge it. The harder I pursue, the more d(esperately I have to flee later on. Or I should say, ra ther, that, is the way things used to ho in the days when I was ashamed of my soul and afraid to fling capital back in the publisher's teeth. As you shall see. A month ago I looked at my bank book and with intense gratification dis covered that the hal:ance had reachedl the unproceenlented high water nmark of 04N) dollars. 'Ihat was enough to change my whole ittitude towards ex istence. prom that time forth until my funds shall sink to zero again I am rich, and despise to recognlise labor even as a sp ealki...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REASONS FOR ROTATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

REASONS FOR ROrTAIONS. At the basis of all genuine rotations lies the fact that plants differ from one another ;they differ from one aa other in their demands upon the soi!, both chemnical and physical; they dit ter with regard to their root system, depth of feeding, their moisture re .uircments, their time of feeding, :heir dates in reaching maturity, etce 11ay plants impoverish the soil; few onrich It; some spoil its physical condition, while others improve it in that regard. MIany crops favor tu:t growth of. weeds, while others either aor able to hold the weeds in cheol: ,r require such cultivation and treat n:e:i as will prevent their growth. All these differences fit plants for different places in rotation, and a well arranged rotation is one in which :he:strong points of one crop follow so as to fit into the weak points of anothi:r, or vice versa, and in this way reduce deficiencies to a minimum. u A crop that requires a large amount oi one element should he followeit It." one...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NERVES AND THE WOMAN. Living Too Hard. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

NERVES AND THE WOMAN, Living Too Hard. This is the age ut ia:rd work: whet, concentration on a ha.iteer one 1h1.1, peniS tO take Iup is essential to su.' cess. The business woman who wa:I'. to get on has to work hard and ih_ lartl e ery hour of the day. T"lit pru ctssional woumanli w .stlat its Wi1i be passed by other oL'lilupel tors In thli race for ninlle and sot- to-:. Llie is s o full of manifold interests that even itie donlestIcait.ei iotiltti,. nit leSS shet leads thie narrowest ol iii es, is occun pled all day long. ',' .Oave all to ileo anid work to the uest of our aiuliity in this ttennetll?h century, and it Is ita ery good thing tihat we have, because it Is tile lilt that is full of \iork and Interests that is best worth Iitinug tlit there is another side to the qutestion. Whilst many women can stand the strain and be all the better for it, a certain number break down. They develop "nerves," they show signs of wear and tear, of over-strain and con stant tension. They begi...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A REMARKABLE BIRD COLONY. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

A REMARKABLE BIRD COLONY. The moist remarkable bird colen'- in tilho world is on Iat. Island. in tLhe Great Salt Lake, PItah. The island is about twelve acres in extent, and on a rocky pinnacle a hundred feet above tl'e brne, with not n drop of Firesh water to l'e found, and where there is ntotlhin to excite the cupidity or clom ilerci:l instinct of Iman, t1 e birtds- gulls, pelicans. herons, and ccrllm-ral? ts by the thotusand--- -make their hlione. The island ciin be seen at a disEan;s of ten rnles, ising'_ like a "cocked !hat' out of the, sapphire of thie inlaud sea. 'The birds are utterly fearless. Pr1 tect'ed as they are by the laws f th, i State. they have had little cause ti, fear man and( his death--d?.?l-in weap ons. It is necessary to use the gre.ats:. care to avoid stepping on the nests and cgs of theo tens of thlouisands of sea fiowl that have established tieir r?eik eries on the islet.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BLOATER. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

THE BLOATER. It is generally known that .a bloitr is a omplete herring slightlyv salted and smoked; but few people ar-aware that the origin of this article of diet was iaccidental. A Yarmouth herring curer, when leaving his premises one night after all his work people had gone found a quantity of good herrings which had been overlooked. Fearing they would be spoiled if left as they were. he sprinkled them a lith salt. and Mii' them in his ':smoke house." in whiclh oak-billet was then being bhrned. The next morninm it was evide? ithat his experimient had been successful. 1I? began .to specialise in this direction. an exaimple which waas speedily ft lhoxed by others. until the famnl of the bloator was established in the land. The kipper is a split herring cured in smoke. The late Mr. John l W oodler of Newcastle-on-Tyno and Ya.'rmouith: was the fortunate discoverer of this me thod! of treating the herring. The process of producing the red iherring is analogous to that of the bloater, ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUBMARINE CINEMA PICTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

SUBMARINE CINEMA PICTURES. Among the prohabilities of the fu ture are moving pictures taken at. the bottom of the sea. Already a young American. ,T. Ernest" Willihamson, has taken snapshots at a depth of thirty five feet, and will soon take a moving priture outfi. to Bormulnda to procuire .detircd submarine scenes. For this trip a special loat- will be used. Wil :li;mnson is a fiewspsapr photographer and cartoonist. His fiither. Capt. J;: U. Williamson, invented the flexiblo sub marine tube from which photogiraph under the water have a nready been takl-en Recently in Hampton Ro.ads SVil liamson, th, younger, went down iil the tube, which was fixed into a well at the: bottom of a bargo thirty feet lons. The well was six feet square. The tube made of iron sections with a water proof cover of rubber and canvas, could he lowered to any depth. At the bot tom. of the tube was the "work-chuin her, C," as Williamson calls it, whieli mavy.bc of any size. In this William son s-.t -,itli an or...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOME SALUTATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

SOME SALUTATIONS. Thle prmtration and tile ralaamnr, sard utations that many Orientals use, are only more pronounced forms of the bow. So there is a connection between the embrace, so commrnon in civilised countries, and the greeting of a mem ber of the Koinri tribe of British New Gn-inae, who, in saluting a nmissionary, placd one arm abou this neck and stroked him under the chin. Among the Masai and the Ukerewe it is a mark of "respect to greet an ac quaintsance or a stranger by spitting at hin. Ahnost as strange is the cus tom ascribed to the Tibetans of putting out the tongue iby waly of salutation. Rubbing amoses is quite common; the Burmese and many tribes of Eskimos, Laplanders. and M3alavs do so. Stranger than any of these customs is the wue'eptio salntation that has been observed among (Central South Amer ican Indians. This form of greeting occurs too in the dAndaman Islands, News Zealand, and P'olynesia. A Por tiguese exploresr thus describes the cus tem as ho saw it used a...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Economical Housewife. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

The EconomIoal Housewife. Mr. Summers was very fond of trout fishing, and each year tried to have at least a week of good sport. The day before he was to start on his long-look ed-for vacation his wife entered the room smiling, and showing her husband some sticky speckled papers. "For goodness sake," he exclaimed. "what are you doing with those old fly papers P" "Why. I saved them for you from last -eason !" she replied. "You know you slid you always had to buy flies when you went fishing!" When Mark Twain. in his early days. was editor of a Missouri paper, a su n-rstitious subscriber wrote to him say :ng that he had found a spider in his naneer, and asking him whether that was a sign of good luhick or bad. The 'insori.st wrote him this answer and "r;nt"d it: "Old Sulscriber.-Findin g a snider in '-,"r paner was neither good luck nor 'tad luck for you. The spider was ",ornly loolring over our paper to see -"hi?hi merchant is not advertising, so flint he can go to that store, spin hi...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HUSBAND'S SKIN TORTURE AND WIFE'S LEG SORES. WONDERFUL DOUBLE CURE BY ZAM-BUK. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

HUSBAND'S SKIN TORTURE AND WIFE'S LEG SORES. WONDERFUL DOUBLE CURE BY ZA_1-BUKI. Zam-Buk is daily demonstrating its excellence as a family medicine by curing the most ubstinate cases of skin disease and inflamed sores. Two splendid triumphs for Za.m-Buik heal ing have just been revealed by 'Mrs. H. Berry, of Ruth-street, Perth, W.A. "'My husband," Mrs Berry says.' was caused great pain and disfigurement by an outbreak of itchy eruptions on his face. The disease, a kind of eczema, first appeared in little blist ers, which burst and formed into run ning sores. Every effort to get rid of the trouble was fruitless until my hus band happened to try a pot of Zam buk. " The balm brought him splendid re lief. The painful irritation was stop ped with the first applications, and as he persevered with it, Zam-Buk cleared away every eruption and left his skin quite clean and healthy. "I also have Zam-Buk to thank for curing me of a bad leg. Following a mild attack of fever, the limb sudden ly b...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CASH REWARDS FOR UGLY WOMEN. Some Quaint Charities. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

CASH REWARDS FOR UGLY WOMEN. Some Quaint Charities. A well-known bachelor who died the other day at Frankfort, Germany, left an endowment for an annual prize of £25 to the man who leads the ugliest woman to the altar. If the bride is lame as well as unprepossessing, the groom will receive an additional sum of £5. This reminds us that the town of Haschmann, in Germany, has a sys tem of rewarding lovers who marry girls who have little or no personal attractions. A well-known financier left a sum of money to the town au thorltles to provide dowries for the plainest woman under thirty married in Haschmann every year. a cripple, and four women under forty who had been jilted several times. Some years ago a merchant of Ken tucky, U.S.A., instructed his execu tors to invest a certain sum of money and divide the interest every year-on their wedding days-among five Am erican girls who were possessed of heads of "reddish-gold' hair. The founder of ihis marriage portion died a bachelor, and th...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEVER NEGLECT BACKACHE. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

NEVER NEGLECT BACKACHE. --------- Do not neglect the warning message of the back that aches. Dackache is a sign that your kidneys are weak. and not able to properly carry out their work of filtering the blood. Then look after your kidneys at the first sign of backache, for if neglected se rious trouble will follow-rheumatic pains, urinary disorder, neuralgia, gravel, stone. dropsy. Take Doan's Backache Kidney Pills in time and the cure is simple. Mr Fi-ederick Erfurth. M'Leod street, Bairnsdale, says:-"I hurt my self live years ago whilst working at the court house here. -My kidneys started to bleed, and I would -pass blood with the secretions. The pains in my back were frightful at times. and things went on like this for two years. Sometimes I would seem nearly right for a time, and then would get as bad as ever again. It seemed as if medicine could not assist me. A few mIlonths ago some hard work I did made my back in a terrible condition: I could not niove without enduring the mo...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A STROKE FOR A THRONE. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

A STROKE FOR A THRONE, Eizabeth Petrowna. daughter of Peter the Great, was the natural suc cessor to her brother, Peter II.. on the Russian throne By the latter's will. however, the empire passed to a cous in, Anne of Courland, who handed it on at her death to a nephew, Ivan, two years of age. Ivan was proclaimed Czar, and his parents, the Duke and Duchess of Brunswick, appointed themselves Re. gents during his minority; but their administration was extremely unpopn lar in Russia and distasteful to the other European Powers. The Princess Elizabeth continued to reside at Court, apparently uninter ested in affairs of State until the dan gers of her position were made clear to her. As the dynastic heir to the throne and the idol of the people, she was the object of the Regents' iea! ousy and suspicion. Secret informa tion compelled her to choose between a desperate stroke for the crown that rightfully belonged to her, or the cer tainty of death on the scaffold. Stirred to action by the...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE VIXEN All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XLVI. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

THE VIXEN S. By LEWIN FITZHAMON. Published by Arrangement with ; S'Vard, Lock . Co.,' Melbourne. F:". All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XLVI. The Court had risen 'for luncheon, And every restaurant in the vicinity .f the Law Courts was inconveniently packedi: the busy clink of knife and 'gork. china and glass, offered. a philo sophic contrast to the continuous mur jmur of subdued argument. The: gen eral topic of conversation was Miss 13urney's evidence. The honest way she had stood up to pross-examination was greatly' com mented upon and admired; yet.a curi ous and unreasonable opinion prevail ed that had John Cott been able to .put his last question himself, Angela .-ould have answered differently;., this ,was the hotly-debated topic: was there . oundation for a suspicion that Angela took the necklace? There was one :uiet corner in an Qupretentious restaurant where there ,g;as tfo argument. The Earl and ;Countess of Pettigew sat there: Pett Crying to thoke, down an .indifferent .:fole, ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THEATRICAL REMINISCENCES A Property Man's Experience. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 16 January 1914

rTHATRICAL REMINISCErICh. A Property Man's Experience. The old property-man seated himsel' on . mnoss-coveredl stump while waiting for tn. play to begin, and in response to my question, said: "Mistakes will occur, and things will get mixed cp in the theatrical business -as well as in any other. I remember one season, in an American town, when I was with a company playing a rural piece called 'The Coun try Farm.' Everything real. you know -real cows, horses, chickens, and all that sort of stuff. One act was in the city, and there were real fire-en gines, cable-cars, ferry-boats, police men, and such like. Good play, and took in money by the barrelful, but hard work for me. Had to buy fresh vegetables for the cows to eat in full view of the audience, and look after * whole raft of such things. "One night out at Zanesville. Ohl just as the curtain went up, the bay mule, which appeared in the first tab leau, kicked the 1rass cannon used in the Fourth of July scene. He was a powerful kic...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x