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Title: Dunmunkle Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,667 items from Dunmunkle Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

ETHODIST CHURCH, MUKTOA Sunday, February 15. 11—Rov. W, R. Jone8. 7—Mr. J. Loats.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Nothing Venture, Nothing Have." [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

"Nothing Venture* Noth ing Have." * This is a favourite motto of the M.P. for IJaltersea, ami he has hulf a hundred stories to quote in its favour. Onco upon a time, h« wns conducting a huge demonstra tion in Ilyde Park, and was him self going round with the lint. A . dctachnieiit of the Guards had ben: sent down to keep order, and, prompted as much by a spirit qI . iuiechicf as anything; else, .John Burns marched up to the otlieer in charge, and held out his hat. Tlu ofliccr put up an eyeglass," and stared from tho ^hat to John, and back again. John stared' no less steadily at hira, chinking the hat suggestively. "Are you in ear nest ?" demanded the captain. " I" am." "Will this go to the women and children V" went on the ollicer. "Jt will," was the brief - reply. Tho glass dropped from tho oHicer's eye, and half a sovereign dropped, into the hat at the same moment.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Faithful Schoolmistress. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

Faithful Schoolmistress. 9 A recent book, entitled "Recollec tions of a Missionary in the Great West," gives a pathetic story of a little schoolmistress who was faith ful to the end. Sho had been visit ing, and, with a dozen or more people, wns caught by a tremen dous ryclono. They wero in a houa« which stood on the edge of a high hliilT. The house was wrecked, and every inmate but one killed. This survivor said that the family wore at supper when the storm struck the house, and the schoolmistress happened to sit next the baby, which was crowing in its high chair. U'hen I hey found the poor girl that night, she was still alive, although sho died almost instantly. Tho wind had torn oil her clothes, even her two rings, and left her but ono shoe. Her hair was whipped to rags. She had been driven through .several bar])ed-wiro fences, and every bone in her body was broken. /In her arms, however, and clasped lightly to her breast, was the ilea (I body of the little child. Woman-like, she ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What Binks Learned. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

What Binks Learned. I -i I Young Cicero Binks was an eru I elite youth, and a regular demon for knowledge forsooth. At his studios he "swotted" to tell you the truth, , for eight or ton hours every ; day. To give you some Tittle idea | of his worth, he knew to a frac 1 lion, the age of the earth, the ac tual weight, of the moon and its girth, uud how* fur nil tho stars were . away. i 11c could tell you the reason why | eggs are not meat, why toadst ools . : | and hedgehogs are not good to eat, also why there can. never be. cold without lieat, and why humble-bees don't make honey. He could analyse, whisky and black-curraut tart, . and. ^ repeat Shakespeare's plays if you gave him a start. In fact, lie was crammed full of science and art,. knowing even why Jtobey is funny. "One can ne'er learn too much," with a smile he would say. But . ho altered his mind, overhearing ,t , one day two friends, who imagined - lnm out of the way, stating .'facts . new to Binks, without doubt. ' , "What...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Strange Sign of Gratitude [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

Strange Sign of Gratitude : 1 "When I w'as starting' in business," says Sir Thomas Lipton,_ " I was very poor, and needed every penny I could earn to enlarge my little I business. I had a lad of fourteen J as assistant. One Monday morn ing the boy came in with a very mournful expression. I asked him what the trouble was, and he said, ' X have no clothes fit to wear at church, sir. 1 can't get a now suit, because Jiiy father iK dead, and V : have to help my mother pay the Irent.' J thought it over, and tin ! ally took enough money from my [ luird-ennied savings to buy the hid a good. warm suit, of clothes, with [ which he was delighted. The next day he did not come to work, nor the next ; and when three days had gone l.iy, and I had heard nothing from him, I went, to his home to find out, what, had become of him. ' Well, you see, sir,' said the mother of ^he boy, ' Robert, looks so respect able in his new suit, thanks to you, sir, that we thought, we had better , look wound town and ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Church Sold for 16s. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

Church Sold for (6s. * Anybody lrfio has tho occasion or leisure to travel in the Frcnch.pro-. • i vinccs, ami the - curiosity . to in- . i quire, must often ""Tie astonished at i the number oi deserted ecclesiasti cal buildin^.s un'd' ttie nt).siii'tlly,loj\yv, ^ *. prices asked for them, since the' ^ liquidation of church property. All records seem, however, to have been- ' beaten by the sale of one of the oldest churches in franco,' at Clare fontaine, in the Scine-et-Oise de-_ partmciit, for exactly sixteen shilU -' lugs and nhiepence halfpenny. • Twelve years ago the. church threat- • i <?iled to fall to pieces, and the richer inhabitants privately subscribed for | and built a new church, to which I lies look tho doors, windows, ami / memorial tablets, including one over I hi- porch, slating that the .church was built, in the year 1 I"1.' " To the honour of (b>il and Our Lady, by Simon Count do Monlfurt, son of Ainulr.v L, who was son of King. Kobert." When all thw...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Picking Pockets. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

Picking Pockets. The Bishop of Worcester told a capital .story the other day in"cou:, nection with the efforts of the Church in that part of the country to alleviate the lot of the hoppers." Oiiy of the workers' who had gone down to the hop-fields to assist met a dilapidated individual in a coun try land, who, in response to ' n question, said he was a picker. This did not convey much to the inquirer , and he pursued the subject. The hop-picker readily responded. He said : "In the summer months I picks peas and fruit ; .then when autumn . comes round I picks hops: and in the winter, when the wea ther's 'dull, I picks pockets. Then, when I'm caught 1 picks oakum. I'm kept nice and warm during the cold mouths, and then, when thi. nice days come round again, I start pea-picking, and so on afresh."

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WIPING OUT OF A CLAN. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

THE WIPING OUT OF A CLAN. The feud which had Ion# raged be tween the famous Scottish clans Macdonald and AfacJeod—the osten sible cause'it of which was an insult ' offered by a Macleod to a daughter of; one of the greatest of the Mac /fonalds—concluded on September 2X, 1749. ^ Macleod set- sail for the island home of the Macdonalils with such1 a number of followers that any re sistance by the inhabitants ' on the • lonely Isle of JCgg would have been folly, and so thought Macdonald when he saw< his hereditary foe np .proaching Che shore. Calling his people together, he cave orders that they should conceal themselves in a cave near the seashore, which, al though large enough to hold lliein all, had but a narrow opening, con cealed by a cascade of water fall ing from I he clifT above. Suspecting a ruse, as the.y could not see any inhabitants, the Mac leods searched the island thorough ly, but without success, and at last concluding that the Macdonalds had left their homes, ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A VALUABLE FIND. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

A VALUABLE FIND. A lower of gold was discovered by some workmen on October 19, 1794, In tlte midst of a thick copse in the neighbourhood of a small village near Hamburg. It was 14 feet high, about 2 feet in circum fcrcnce, and modelled after the style of an old Gothic tower. Jt -wa.s made of virgin gold, and was valued at so large a sum that no person cguld purchase it. The owner of the land claimed it ; but Government took possession of it without any payment, though, eventually they granted the land lord 25,000 florins for .it, and then melted it down and convert ed it into current coin. It had evidently been erected on a clear space of ground, and com memorated the martyrdom of a famous saint. The ornament a.1 trac ing represented a long-bearded man tortured to death at the stake, and on the base was the figure of i a woman, witl^ outstretched hands and flying hair. - -

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Wonderful Insect. LOOKS LIKE A LITTLE GREEN ELECTRIC LIGHT GLOBE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

A Wonderful Insect. ♦ LOOKS LIKE A LITTLE GREEN ELECTRIC LIGHT GLOBE. There exists in the tropical coun tries of America and in the West Indies a curious species of inscct which the natives call "Cocuyos," meaning night light. inscct. This inscct emits a brilliant green light from each eye awl a green light from the under part of the stomach. Sonic of the natives in Cuba, Mexi co nnd South America- use the insect light to read by, placing about fifty of them in a long glass tube or bottle, called a"Oocu yera." Another method is to hang the "Cocuycra" over one's bed and then when you want to seo the time at night,- strike the bottle genlly with the hand, when the "Cocuyos" will light up..'..' This insect is .(juite harmless and inoffensive and can be carried in the hand. If its stomach is gently pressed, by forefinger and thumb it will give a light like a. small elec tric-torch. These peculiar insects vary in size, but the largest come from the Province of Vniar del Kio, in .Cuba, an...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COURAGEOUS TELEGRAPH GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

COriJAOKOUS TliLISfJ KA1MI U1UI,. Mademoiselle .Juliette Dodu, :V| girl of twenty, was in 1870 em ployed as telegraph clerk at I'ithi- , vicrs, France, when, on September , -7, the advance guard of the Gcr- j man army entered the little town, i German operators occupied the telegraph office, and it seemed im- ' possible to keep in touch with the French commander outside; but .lu-j liette hail taken a telegraph appa ratus up to her bedroom, and con- | nec.ted it to the wires outside her i window. She thus succeeded,' at tlic I time of the battle of Beaune, in, intercepting-, a German military mes- j sage, which she sent secretly by spe cial messenger to the French com mander thirty miles away. Suspected and watched, she, found herself obliged to remove her appa ratus to a neighbour's house, and finally to cease telegraphing alto gether ; the servant, who had a Prussian sweetheart, threatening to denounce her. After tlie war she was" decorated with the Legion of .Honour, and received ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RENOVATING PASPALUM. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

RENOVATING PASPALUM. As illustrating the wonderful recu perative powers of paspalum, a pad dock which had been in paspalum for thirteen or fourteen years was ploughed up. This was necessitated by constant cutting for seed and _ heavj, grazing having weakened the sward. The experience in question was that of a settler in the Coramba district, New South Wales Some time ago a paddock of twelve acres was ploughed up with the object ol utilising it for the growing of fodder crops for the dairy herd. Being dry at the time the work was heavy, and "the ploughing necessarily shallow. About the middle of December maize .was sown. Dry conditions continuing produced indifferent germination. But with the storms of January the pas palum made a move, the young growth showing up between the sods as if it had been planted. JThe maize was about 4 to 5 feet high, but the paddock was one waving field of pas palum fencc high, and in full seed. The response was simply wonderful. An interesting feature of...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. THE ABUSE OF ARTIFICIAL MANURE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

THE FARM. ♦ THE ABUSE OF ARTIFICIAL MANURE. In a lecture recently delivered be fore the Maytield Farmers' Club, Mr. G. A. Cowie, M.A., B.Sc., in describ ing certain abuses of artificial fertili sers, pointed out as one of the most flagrant the far too comm:«i system of one-sided or incomplete manuring. Many farmers were prone to use only one sort of manure and neglect altogether the other fertilising in gredients which may be as important or even more important, for the crop or soil in question. As practical instances of the above error, the lecturer quoted the fre quent use alone of nitrate of soda, which at first might pro lucn a luxu riant growth, but will afterwards refuse to perform its proper function owing to the exhaustion of the natu ral phosphates and potash in thi soil. The withholding of these essen tial constituents from the manuring often explains the unsatisfactory re sults' obtained from nitrate of soda, which, in consequence, is described as a "scourge" and "stimula...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
His Grace Ungracious. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

His Grace Ungracious. / f— "Not without dilliculty, the young I Mike of Kuightsbridge— fiiin ilinrly known as the " Night bird"—had been persuaded Lo.accept an Invitation to lunch at the "com modious antl well-appointed" resi dence of Mr. Uolls-l!asher, the Soap K'mperor. Towards the end of the meal the genial • soap emperor grew more and ' more depressed. Not one of his treasures had evoked the faint est flicker of ducal approval. In a .frenzy of despair, Mr. llashcr played his* trump card, some price less - Napoleon brandy, declared by tho greatest .connoisseurs to be the finest-liqueur'that;- ever a gourmet could desire. f Uriabie to 'contain himself longer, old Itasher bent across the table with bulging eyes. "What do you think of this brandy, Dukehe asked, with tremulous geniality. "Not bad,, eh The "Night-bird" slightly opened one eye,* steadied his monocle, and favoured his host with, a blank stare. "Er—no—not very," ho lauguidly replied.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. BETSY BALCOMBE AND THE OGRE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. * 15ETSY BAIX'O.MLiE AND TUB OGltE. On October 3 3, 1815, Napoleon | Bonaparte (yesterday arbiter of Europe, now a captive "general," j condemned to lifelong exile) arrived | at the lonely island of St. Helena. ; The strange stories told of the "Corsican Ogre" had led some simple folk to imagine liiirx as something more fiendish than hu man, and when he rode up to Briers Cot.tage, on his way into the interior of the island, two pretty girls who had been watching the cavalcade beat a precipitate re treat. Their father checked their foolish fears, and fourteen-year-old Betsy Balcombe saw a. pale, but still .dignified, man descend from his horse and enter the garden. .Finding .the girl knew some ■■-■■French,..1 Napoleon amused himself by ' ■ .questioning her, and in ten minutes B.ctsy and the "ogre" were the best : ■ .of friends. The .acquaintance rip- i .-ened ■ during Napoleon's temporary' -residence at the "Briers," and be- ' j fore a w'eek was, over the ty...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Four-mile Tunnel. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

! ! A Four-mile Tunnel. 4 1 The Mont cTOr tunnel between Franco and Switzerland, ou Which t boring operations began nearly three years ago, was pierced a few days ago. At half-past seven in the evening the two boring gangs which had been advancing from the Swiss, the French sides met and shook hands, and it 'was found that the engineers had calculated the cutting . with the greatest accuracy. The tunnel, which is 0$ miles long, bores through the Jura mountains j from Frasne to VallOrbcV thus (obr | viating an eleven-mile detour by J Pontariier, and should have been pierced two months ago. The work, however, was delayed - by the tap ping' of a number of unsuspected springs which had been pumped dry. The outrush of water at one time reached 2,200 gallons a second. It is hoped to open the new line early next year. The line, by shortening the journey from Paris to Lausanne, will'.bring the winter resorts of the ■ Iura mouulaiiis many hour.-j nearer London.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TEA CAKES. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

TEA CAKES. . 1 tablespoon butter, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 egg, \ cup milk, J tabkspoon currants, essence, Jfb. flour, 2 table spoons baking powder. Mode :—Heat butter and .sugar to a cream, add the well-beaten egg, then thp inilk, cur rants, and lastly flour and baking powder ; bake in small greased patty tins. An offer of £21,000 has been refusal for a carpet in the possession of J.v han Kernowsky, a Prague ant i;?iiar;,. who claims that he can prove it to Lave been used by the prophet ili /iomet when at prayer. A Grand ilapid.s (Michigan) woman has just graduated from the high school of that city at the age of fifty. She plans to study for a degree at the University of Chicago. Last year a Brooklyn woman aged seventy seven attended one of the public night schools, and at the closc of the season received her diploma with the rest of the class. 1915,

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A FURTUNE IN A COIN. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

A FUKTUjNlil IN A COIN. Somewhere in the world there is a i fortune in it coin. Among the coins Napoleon hail minted were 'sonic minimis of five-franc pieces, 'and he del ermined lo ]n>|>iil;iriso these in an e\t raordinnry way. In one of I lu? coins, folded lo a tiny size, was enclosed a mile signed by ■ Napoleon. and promising tin? sum . of 5,(Hii!,(inn francs—about. i:2(>0,"H>0 j—l.o the finder of that particular i coin. Naturally, everybody who changed a I urge piece demanded the new five franc coins in exchange, mid as a rule probed and dug nnd sounded the metal in eager search for the hidden note. .Hut. the years went on, nnd .vet. the note did not ap pear. 'Napoleon's plighted word is a sacred trust to the French na tion, and to-day the Government stands ready to pay the debt, which, is now worth £1,475,000— upou demand.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Biblical Town Located. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

Biblical Town Located. ? •Professor Sellin, tlio excavator of Jericho, lias achieved a new tri umph by the location of the Is raelilish city of Shechem, which is associated in the Bible with' the Dames ' of Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph, and was the capital of King Jeroboam. Until lately the site of Shechem has been a matter of dispute. Professor Sellin located rit as lying "under a.low hill at Ba lata, a short distance east of the -modern , town, of Nablus. Just re cently ho had . the satisfaction of proving himself, to be right. Ex cavations, carriecl on portly at the cost of the Vienna Academy of Science, revealed great, parallel walls in 110 way inferior to the defences unearthed, by Sellin at Jericho. Both walls end in towers, which are supposed to represent the city ffutcs. TWnn.v vnlimMo hronzo unci coriiiuic. relirs were found, the ile po.si < .s diitiiiR' from ('n nan nitisll up to (Iri'i'l; limes. The ex(<>iit of the ruins proses Shechcni to have been...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Romance of London Water [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 13 February 1914

Romance of London Water ♦ It is jUBt throo centuries ago that the water of the New River was turned into the company's reservoir at Clerkenwell. The four years' la I bour, backed by the enterprise anil faith of Sir Hugh Myddelton, brought water to London through wooden pipes and to Londoners' houses by small loaden pipes. But, like many great inventors, lie was almost ruined in carrying out his idea, and never gained a farthing from the New River Company, which paid no dividend during his life time. It is the fato 01 the artist whose picture, given in payment of : a tavern bill, is priced at thou sands aftor his death. Myddelton, if he still notes mundane matters, must be glad that his company promotion ended in usefulness and profit. A single £5 original share in the Now River Company would bring its owner to-day a fortune of something- like £100,000 ! i -

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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