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Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral,... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 118,866 items from Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE WAR-HORSES OF GREAT GENERALS. HOW THEY MET THEIR DEATHS. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

THE WAR-HORSES OF GREAT GENERALS. HOW THEY MET THEIR DEATHS. If horsos could speak it is very likely that they would have sent a delega tion of influential equine representa tives to Washington some time ago and protested very roundly against the war with Spain. They could naturally insist that war is a most dangerous occupation for horse* to engage in. Bad or scanty ration?, change of climate, hard work and ' whizzing bullets are all to be as much feared by these dumb brutes as by their masters, and only a few horses ever receive any credit for the splendid assistance they give in long marches and bloody battles. Out of the many thousands who havo given their humble lives, most gallantly perish ing in their duty towards their mas ters, just a few return home to spend their lives ia the oase and honour they deserve. One warhorso, however, who has made a splendid record for himself, and now has his virtue's, name and noble deeds engraved on a fitting tombstone, was the littlo chestnu...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ADVENTURE IN ST. PETERSBURG. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

AN ADVENTURE IN ST. PETERS BURG. Some few winters ago I was in Sb. Peters burg, there were four obher Englishmen besides myself, and we five had u festive time. I believe either one or moro of us were oub every nighb— balls, dinners, and operas, etc., etc Just about that time there was a great to-do about street robberies, there are always plenty of them at that time of the year in St. Petersburg for that matter, but that particular winber there seemed tobequibean epidemic of robbery. There was one thief in particular who seemed to have a regular system of his own ; he used to take an isooshtchix (cab man) and make him drive slowly about the streets after dark till somebody came in ' sighb wibh a particularly good fur Lap on, . and then while I ho cabman pub his horse to bhe gallop, bhe thief would lean forward, snatch ab the man's cap as he passod, and be oaf- of sight in a moment. However, he caught a Tartar at lasb ; for a man who had heard of him wenb out one night with a new fu...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BIZZY'S PIPE. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

4 BIZZY'S_PIPE. Prince Bismaick is a great pipe collector, and the Bem °t k'8 collection has a curious hisfory. Many years ago, as Bismarck was strolling in the suburbs of Friedricbsruh with his tiro bounds, ha was accosted by a Bohemian peillnr and asked to buy a pluiu meershaum pipe of the type that Bismarck most affected. At first he decliied, but the pedlar Dlaimed for the pipe a power of forecast, and told him he would serve three Emperors an Minister, and that three importaat changes in life would be fore told by nccidenls befalling the pipo. Laueh inc, Bismarck bought the pipe. He has since served three Emperors. Two days before the historic moment when ho was lcfused an uutiience the stem of thepipo separated and'fell to pieces. Later lie chipped a piece from thn side «t the bowl ncciuVntalfr, and within a mouth bis practical dismissal by the Emperor occurrrd. Thn third sign in ret to come, aail Biimarch believes thai when it does it will fore* toll hi. death.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Sir Walter Scott. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

'. . Sir Walter Scott. One of the earliest of my noteworthy, recollections fs that of a dull, depressing day under Scottish skies, when I shared' the basy chair in which my father's dearest friend reposed, with his kind arm1 thrown round the little girl who nestled bv his side— an elderly man with gray hair falling over his prominent forehead, thick bushy eyebrows- almost hiding the eyes that -were at that mo ment dim and sad, but capable of gloam inawith fiery enthusiasm when roused on' subjects .immortalised by his genius or connected with the welfare of his be loved native land. His countenance then wore a sombre, expression ; -for it was a marked and mournful day in the life of Waller Scott—almost the darkest he had ever' known— since the blow which bad struck him the evening before, when ho returned home from a gay dinner party in our house, i- an nounced' the total wreck of his fortunes, the loss' of many years of arduous labour, and tho necessity of recommencing yet - more st...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Short Story. A Kiss in the Dark. Being a Tragedy of Errors at a Western Army Post. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

. Short Story. A Kiss in the Dark. Rcing a Tragedy of Errors at, a Western Army Post. Tho first error was a distinctly human one, feminine, particularly— that of not being satisfied with a good thing and let ting well enough alone, ' well enough' being in this case a first lieutenant of more- than ordinary nttractions. There are. very few womon who are satisfied ' when only one man is the captive of their charms ; they prefer a dozen sonpi rants to one, even if they arc themselves enamoured of tho one. The name of the gallant soldier whose good fortune it was to have obtained for his promised own the winsome daughter of Captain Pos ter, was Appleton, his fortune was his ?' ' own good sabre, and his pay of ipl2o a month; his 'character the full ideal of an officer and a gentleman ; as for his appearance, it was all that even Miss Foster, who might have had the pick of some seven or eight others, could de sire. The only excuse lo be found for ' the' first error is that Miss Foster was...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Counting the Buckets. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

Counting the Buckets. Swansea is the proud possessor of one of the largest dredges to be found on our coast. A party of colliers from the Rhondda were paying a visit to the-pier the other day, and for one of their num ber the endless row of buckets seemed to possess a singular fascination. While the others went off to enjoy themselves at the Mumbles or elsewhere, Shoni would not budge an inch, but kept his gaze firmly fixed on the. dredge. About 7 in the evening his friends found him still on the same spot. Tell ing him the train would leave without him if ho did not make haste, ShonT ex claimed : — 'I don't care ; I have counted 11,003, and I moan to see :the last of them buckets If I stop all night.' -- And they left him counting.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Woman's Postscript. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

. A Woman's Postscript. ' 'Why women write postscripts' is a problem that has been engaging the at tention of one of the London woman's weeklies. The answers betray that the sex understands itself, and does not mind exDoslnrr Its amiable weaknesses. All are from women, who ascribe, among others, these reasons : — ' Because they seek to rectify want of thought by an afterthought ;' ' because they are fond of having a last word ;' ' because they write before they think and think after they have written.' Our correspondent puts down the femi nine P.S. to the same cause ' which leads women to prolonged leave-taking In om nibuses — namely,' and rather profoundly it appears to the casual observer, ' that they lack organisation of . thoughti' Another woman comes to the defence of her sisters with the suggestion ' that when women have anything special to communicate they know that their P.S. is equivalent to N.B.,' and yet another friendly soul turns a neat compliment in her reason :— ' Pro...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Value of Honey. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

Value of Honey. The medicinal value of honey seems little understood, and likewise its value as an artiole of diet, considered from an economic point of view. In the majority of families it iB considered a luxury rather man a necessity or an economy, and why this should be is a mystery. It has been abundant and of exceptional quality, and yet, in spite of these facts, we find it in but little use as compared with the quantity that could be used to advantage, both as regards taste and health of the family, to say nothing of the lighter drain upon the family purse that would be found, comparing the price of pure honey with that of good butter. To be sure, the average individual will sp mad butter upon the bread before the honey. But not more than half the amount of butter will be used when honey is also used that there would be if no honey were used. But it is from a taste and hygienic point of view that we are looking particularly towards this pro duct, nnd advising a greater consump...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Our Ancestors. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

Our Ancestors. Perhaps we shall better understand the advantage of living in these later cen turieB if we try to pioture the position in which our ancestors were placed. They could not look either into the heavens or into the earth, into the sea or into the land as we do. They had philosophy without any scale, and they had astronomy without demonstration. They made war without powder or shot, cannon or gunB. They went' to sea without compass, and sailed without the needle. They looked at the stars without tele scopes, and measurod altitude without barometers. Their houses had no windows, and no fire-places, as we under stand them. They had no vehicles to travel in, nnd no roads on which they could have travelled. They had no post, because thoy had no letters to send. There was no printing presB. A deal board had to do duty for a love letter. They had no fashion plates and no dress pattorns given away, because the richest robeB were the skinB of the most formidable monsters. Were the...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Not Her Fault. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

Not Her Fault. ' Mary, I'm tired of your carelessness. Look at that dust lying about in that corner, and even on the furnitnro ; it is six months old at the very leaBt I' Mary (stiffly) : ' Then it s no fault of mine, mum, for I've only been with you three months. It's the last girl you should blame, not me.' Patient (who has just had hiB eye operated upon): 'Doctor, it seems to me ten guineas is a high price to oharge for that job. It didn't -take yon ten soconda.' Eminent Ooulist : ' My .dear friend, in loarning to perform this operation in ten seconds I have spoiled moro than two bushels of such oy ob as yours.' Shopman : 'What style of hat do you wish, sir?' ,, v Oholly : ' Ah, I'm not particular about the style— something, to suit my head, don't you;know.' ?? ;'? Shopman: 'Step this way and look at our soft hats.' v Why is the letter F like a cow's tail ? — Beoau&e it's the end of beet.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Egg-Laying of the Codlin Moth. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

Egg-Laying of the Codlin Moth. ? : ? M-4 ? . From the Agricultural Gazette of N.S. W. ? v Professor Slingerland has been in vestigating the habitB of the codlin moth. He finds that the egg is deposited on the side of the fruit, and not in the calyx. It ia a little smaller than a pin-head, flattened and transparent, so 'that the colour of the apple shows through it. Under the microscope the surface is marked with lines, and looks like a fish scalo. At first they were difficult to make out, but afterwards easy. After oareful investigations he found hundreds of eggs in the orchard, soat tered over the fruits. The young worm was hatched out in about ten days, and at first is little larger than a hair. It remains on the surface several hours, then crawls about till it reaches the calyx, where it works its way between the lobes, and enters the oavity. The practioo of spraying as soon as blossoms fall is effective, beoause the calyx. lobes are then open, and the Paris green is readily depo...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Pat's Retort. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

Pat's Retort. An Irishman happened to be travelling in the same carriage with two very learned-looking lawyers, one on either side of him, when the latter, somewhat displeased with the uncouth manner of tlia Irishman, thought that by the in fluence of some cynical remark he might bo made moro tolerable. Accordingly, one of the lawyers, tap ping Pat on the shoulder, remarked : ' Are you an ass or a mule, young man ?' 'Neither, your honour,' replied Pat; ' but I'm between the two I'

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
One for the Bobby. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

One for the Bobby. ' Hallo 1 Where aro you going ?'' Don't go up there j.it's dangerouB.' ' What is the matter?' ' ' They are going to blast up in the quarry in a few minutes.' 'Well, there isn t any danger. ' Yes, there is.' 'Oh, no; I don't think there is I I see a policeman up there, and if there was any danger ho wouldn't be there.'

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Bishop and the Coster. Ride to Brentford in a Donkey Shay. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

The Bishop and the Coster. — -♦« — Ride to Brentford in a Donkey Shay. ? ' ? * ? . -A The appearance of a high Church dig nitary in a coater's shay aroused much curiosity at Brentford on Palm Sunday. The Lord Bishop of Marlborough, it ap pears, on his arrival at the station in the afternoon in order to conduct a confirma tion service at St. Lawrence's church. found to hiB dismay that there waa no cab or vehicle to convey him to his destination. Just as his LordBhip was debating how he could cover the distance in time for the service, a coster with his donkey and barrow uunie along, and the Bishop promptly got out of his difficulty by mounting boaide the driver and riding through l he main street of the town to his destination, arriving in good time. To a newspaper reporter Dr. Earle gave some interesting details of his adventure : — ' Brentford is a difficult place to reach on a Sunday,' said the Bishop. ' I went to Ghinnersbury by train, and there hoped to find a cab to carry me to...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Drunkenness. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

Drunkenness. Of all the evils that afflict mankind at the present day drunkenness is un doubtedly the greatest. Beside this all .other evils aihkinto significance. War, famine, pestilence, are only shadows in comparison. These have their times and seasons, aud like all human things ultimately decay and perish, but drunk enness abides with us for ever. It is the eternal companion of humanity, a demon spirit that defies exorcism. . No human tongue or pen can adequately desoribe its powers and ravages. It is more like an exotic from Hell than a natural growth from earth. In its universal destructivenesB, drunkenness' ranks next to the grim monster Death itBelf. With its mighty scythe it mows down battalions of the human race nnd sweeps them into the whirlpool of destruction. Not oon tent with ravaging the body it penetrates the immortal regions of the soul, and lays there the seeds of corruption and decay. Benson itself, the finest faoulty of man, surrenders its power at the ap proaoh ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Man of Straw. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

A Man of Straw. This is a common expression used tip denote a person who is not possessed cfi any moans or one of no substantial character. The origin of the saying is not so well known as the meaning of it. It used to be customary for worthless fellows to loiter about tho Law Courts ready to become witnesses to anything (false witnesses, of course), or to become Burety for anyone who would buy their services. They wore as a badge some straw in their shoos. As they were utterly penniless and without principle, a man of straw became proverbial.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Household. Woman's Sympathy. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

? The toehold. Woman's Sympathy. ; A man wants womanly interest and sympathy always. Nothing gets such a hold on his heart, and keeps it so fast, »s when a womun_show8 him she thinks him and his affairs matters of vital importance, and is ready to be sorry when he is sorry, and to rejoice when he is glad. Nothing wins his love like the gentle womanliness that listens and cares. The girl who inspires, in a man a desire to oonfide in her has gone further in the direction of winning his love than she has any idea of. So those who would be loved must make themselves lovable. They must forget themselves for the sake of others, then those others will remem ber them. They must be true to their own manhood und womanhood. We love and admire the noblest specimens of the race, not the most unworthy. Let ub, then, cultivate those qualities that excite the love and the admiration of the whole world. Then wo shall more surely be able to win tho one love out of the universe that we desire to posse...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Curious Sponges. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

Curious Sponges. The spongo is'.'£/w recognisod by natural ists as an animal. It is a ono-coll struoture, eaoh individual coll having a different func tion to perform. Somo aro fortho absorption of water and somo for tho consumption and diirestion of food . Sponges have no stomachs, but thoir food is aBsimilatod. Soon after boing taken out of tho water tho animal matter decays, leaving tho substance, which becomes an artiolo of commerce. Sponges aro frequently found attaohod to shells, around which thoy ontwino, but moro fre quontly tlioy ntfcaoh thomaelves to rocks. Tho boring spongo is one of the most in teresting and ourious members of thofnmily. It will bore holes into hard oaloaroous objeots. 'Straighten your back, Foley,' said a magistrate the other day in a country police court, to a constable. 'I objeot; your worship,' said the limb of the law. 'I'll rise an 'object on your 'boko,' if you answer me back in that tone of voioe.' Gabber : ',-' What does your ion do for a living...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Per Dog Messenger." [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

' I»«r I-osr McssMiffftiV The pretty village of West Stafford, a, few miles from Weymouth, has' 'a dog stoij which show the MCiteM stgicily of certain members of the canine family. The. South-weHlern Railway tnlii sects Mr. Smith s farm, between Dorchester and Moreton, and the trains b tween these two stations are usually run time at full speed. Some three-quarters- of a mile from the house rises a high embank ment where tho line crosses the \ ill y and about nine years' ago Mr. Smith arranged to have his dally jounirrt thrown by the guard as the train pisses this particular spot. ? ' Pompey,' a spaniel, took a dally walk for' some time with his master to pick up the paper. The dog was not long In grasping the pin-port of this dailywalk, and after a time he begin to be despatched alonp Tn time he became Sflifcabituated to th work (says ' Black^ffi^. White) that for the last two or three(-.years he has re quired' no order, but has left of his own accord attho exact tlhie. He trots al...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Comic Cuttings. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 14 September 1898

CoimcUDjittmgS' ? ? -SBKT-— ? _ ? , A Man of Resc'rvo— TUe- gcrJ'e^tuoi of. the Bank of England. / ' ' Another Title ' !— Supplemental G lytJ^^C Dr. W. G. Giace to be . Ci lcKot FicM- '} Maishal , ?.£? A Difference— ' Was she diossecl fas^ Ionnr-iyJ':--i4j5^-biit iif r gown wis^nc very much worn. ' '^A-^^^m ? ?MJr.i.. The hen-pecked liusbind who miswh^tej train he has promised his wife to ictuin ' on, ' catches it.' when ho gets home. Anarchy threatens to revive In Chica go. The brewers have cut prices un I il beer can be obtained for almost nothing. It is a fortunate thing for corporations that they have no souls, for they wn-jld have a tough time in the next world. The Chinese, it appears, are fond of stale eggs. This accounts for there being something rotten in the state of China. ?It has long been understood that mar riages are made In heaven. It is quite a- 'shock then to read occasionally of one being rhade in tho penitentiary. - Judge : ' And you are accused of throwing a mug...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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