ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Indian Advocate, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
4,460 results
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. U chops and casting hungry and fright ened looks behind. The Indians have reached the sum mit and dismounted. They seem to be holding a consultation. Their ponies are grazing beside them. Softly, gradually, the death song of the Sioux is borne by that snow-cooled breeze to the ears of the soldiers. They watch the swaying forms of the Indians as the wail rises higher. There is solemnity as well as fierceness in the scene. There is pathos, despite the bitter hatred on both sides. The chant of the braves swells into a volume of sound, and then sinks into a sigh. For a second there is absolute silence. A yell, terrible in its shrillness, cleaves the stillness. It is the warcry of the Sioux. The death song has ended in the battle shout. As the lightning leaps from a cloud the Sioux leap to their horses and face the troops. Again that savage cry goes up, and the three Brules dash in mad fury down the hill straight toward the gleeming rifles of a thous and men in blue....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

HmadM3MMHHIBHI3BS3BSaMMBHaawa 48 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. periences in odd corners of the world. Half a dozen of them had just come in from a bath in the ocean, and Tom Harlee had asked for a story that none of them had ever heard. So the Pro fessor went on: "The time I am going to tell you about was, in fact, the first time I had ever been up in the region about Athabasca Lake." "Where is that, please?" inquired Josephine Montmorency Brown, who was always asking questions. "I know," said Bob Carter. "It's 'way up in Canada." "In the Northwest Territory," said the Professor. "But the lake doesn't matter much, so far as this story is concerned. Would you like to know how we lived and what we ate?" " Yes, sir," from a chorus of voices. "We carried no food," continued the Professor. When a white man goes on a long journey into a country where there is little chance of finding a hotel every few miles, he loads himself down with a lot of things. He usually buy3 or hires horses, and piles on ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. W and sowed into little rolls, as if you should take a curled shaving or bits of paper and fasten the edges together into a tube. Then these tubes are sowed together, and there you have a rug that cold and dampness will not go through. Of course you boys and girls know that air in a box is one of the best sub stances known to keep out either heat or cold. Hollow bricks are used a great deal for this reason as fireproof parti tions, and if plumbing is enclosed in two wooden boxes, with an air space between them, it will not freeze. "Well, as I said, these Indian blan kets are the warmest I ever saw, and I admire them very much. Finally, one evening I asked one of the Indians how many rabbits it took to make a blanket, for I could see that it took a great many. Then the oldest Sioux in the party told me this story: " 'The first man who ever made one of those blankets went out into tho great woods in the dead of winter. It was very cold, and the snow covered all th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

1 ' in ' y jmpp mj'ww y'-" 4Hywvjmw!vMWP "wwpy W" i wpff)pwiwg Ttskev ifto fr U THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TjtQ ApScl ofjpargatory. HOW MANY SWEET REMINISCENCES THIS TITLE RECALLS TO A CHRISTIAN MINI). V 4 . i - , fliMByify ' ' $nKHrait?rt ' REV. D. VINCENT, O. S. B. IN MEMORIAM. Leo Jolly, in religion Rev. D. Vin cent, 0. S. B., was born in the diocese of Meaux, France, on the 9th of Sep tember, 1860. It was his misfortune to lose both his father and mother in his childhood, but a kind Providence entrusted him to the care of the good Sisters of Charity. These angels in human form were not slow in perceiving the quickness of mind and happy dis position of the young orphan, and, as he was gifted with a beautiful voice, they had him received among the altar boys of the Cathedral of Meaux, in the hope that he might eventually develop a vocation for the holy priesthood. At the age of fourteen, the two roads lay open before Leo Jolly, one leading to the sanctuary, the other to the world. He fi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

Ifpflpf Ifipw Mpjpj" TiTJE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4.5 est; but not demonstrative. Ho shrank from no labor however hard; nay, he seemed to take a particular delight in the humblest and hardest tasks. When an iniquitous law against all religious institutions of men in France was applied to our monastery, the soldiers sent to expel the monks found Brother Vincent in the bakery in the act of drawing loaves of bread from the oven. Ho politely begged to resume his habit of S. Benedict, and to have the honor of being expelled in his true character of a monk. The violent dispersion of our monastic families gave to Brother Vincent and his fellow-novices an occasion of return ing to their respective homes, and would have furnished them with a ready ex cuse for not following their holy voca tion, had they been so minded. Brother Vincent was then subjecte'd on the part of his friends and relations to the most delicate and severe trials of virtue. Offers, entreaties, blandishments, snares of all kinds...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

., V-.v '.,, W&Q niPifjinw iiAVprnni iiiim my ffw'vwwajgii.u;1 ' Hffl-wy "WPWQflfl P' ' .0 TilE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the person of Rev. Father Vincent. Priest and missionary in name and in deed, we soon see him enter upon his noble career and it is under this char acter that he should be remembered henceforth. It is to the forming of that noble character that all the circum stances of his past life seemed to have been ordained by Almighty God. 0, noble priest and faithful mission ary! How can we depict you to those who have never known you? So zeal ous, so self-forgetting, so indefatigable; ever ready by day or night, and in all kinds of weather to fly to whatever part of your mission, on the call of duty or charity; always gay, always cheerful. Rev. Father Vincent was sent to Purcell when that town was not a year old, and at once and quite naturally made himself quite popular with all classes of citizens in this border town, the gate-city of Oklahoma on the south, and a typical ren...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

mmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4-7 works of charity that the disease which was to lead him to a premature grave began to assert its presence in his system, although it was not then diag nosed under its true character of a cancer of the stomach. Three years ago grave internal disorders began to show themselves, and the doctor, a per sonal and devoted friend of Father Vin cent, enjoined him to put some restraint upon his zeal. It was in vain. Father Vincent would rise from his sick bed to take a forty mile ride to visit some of his sick people; and one day when, after a severe spell of fever, he had thus ex posed his life to answer a sick call, he was caught in the act, and the doctor exclaimed, with some impatience: "Ah, Father, you are a very good priest, but you are not a wise man. You are the worst patient I ever treated." Indeed it is our firm belief that he would have been spared many years more if he had not thus attenuated his strength by constant exposure and a false notion of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

A8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. health could be granted to fervent prayers, her own Sisters and pupils would obtain it from Almighty God. Even his Bishop, Right Rev. Th. Meer shaert, would have gone to give him a last blessing, if it had not been for sudden and imperious duties, which forced him to give up this sad satisfac tion. So much was our dear lamented brother loved by all! So much also was his usefulness in the service of God and of souls appreciated, that one per son offered to God(the sacrifice of her own life, that his might be spared; and another, a mother of a family, offered two of her dear little children, if it might please His Divine Majesty to ac cept them instead of the zealous mis sionary. Father Vincent kept his pre sence of mind to the last, and saw death come to him, without fear or regret. During the last eight days, having re ceived Extreme Unction, and being unable to receive Holy Communion, he turned his mind wholly to God, and repeated often: "Into Thy hands, 0, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

-,.iwmmmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmi The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VII. JULY, 1895. No. 3. Em' . ' v7 V tyM' c f . r 4uJ R&3 tU i PSiafiSyiiilH j V I 1 - xmmmm m ja wf nnBiii nil Rgfl 1 X A jjj' jLAk ? ak TWSsWviiHrPP HEP'S s- t wt(I ST. PATRICK'S MISSION. St. Patrick's Mission, at Anadarko, Indian Territory, was established about four years ago. Rev. Fr. Isidore Rick lin, 0. S. B., its chaplain and wise director, is a man of indomitable per severance, and though the obstacles to its success were and are yet many, he has calmly surmounted and will con tinue to overcome them. To Mother Catherine Drexel, the noble protectress of the Indians, this mission owes much. She furnished first the necessary funds for the residence of the priest. How grateful the red men ought to be, and what loving prayers should they pour to the throne of God for their bene factress ! Not long afterward, money from the same source came for the erection of a convent. A ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

50 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. not the Indian so 'mixed with the white race that it requires great mathematical skill to discover the exact amount of Indian blood in his veins, but the real semi-savage They glory in their blan kets and paints and well they may, are they not living in the Land of the Free? When worshiping the Great Spirit they leave all else aside, and in their simple way implore Him to bless their homes, papooses, and benefactors. I assure you, their respect and devotion during the services might be imitated even by our highly civilized Americans without detriment to their piety. An interpreter is occasionally had to repeat in Indian the able discourse of Fr. Isi dore. We may be far above these poor Indians intellectually, but I have not' the least doubt that many a prayer made by these untutored children of the plains rises with a sweeter fragrance before the great white throne than man' a finely phrased devotion of our's. The children in all number 9G, com ing from diffe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

wmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 51 Wo notice the babo in its mother's arms express its sense of pain by its wail of sorrow; and when it utters its inarticulate cry of joy, the mother knows that the sunshine of pleasure and light is beaming upon the soul of her child. "And what n music it is to the mother's ear, "Baby's cry of joy! " When the mother bears her first born in her arms, the voice of nature is awakened within her, then she will bo heard crooning to her little one, if never before her voice has been lifted in melody. When the heart of youth or maiden throbs in the ecstasy of first-love, all nature becomes a sweet song and their thoughts seek expression in harmony. Music and love are in unison. And what shall wo say of the heavenly melodies heard in the depth of the soul, at the moment of their vocation, by such as arc called to a religious life ! Let us notice that even from the beginning man has always been accus tomed to express his emotions of joy or sorrow by song. Ada...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

52 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. voice now be in lioaven above, since on earth thou didst ravish angels by its melodies! " As music is the natural expression of man on earth, so also we know from Holy Writ that it is the language from heaven. There the joy of the blessed angels of God is expressed in divine and celestial song. There the angelic hosts are ever engaged in singing the praises of God and proclaiming His majesty; there the air is resonant with cries of joy, with the sweet concord of many sounds, mingled with the angelic harpers on their harps. "Music has charms to soothe the savage breast.' ' The wildest passions are controlled by music; w.e cannot exaggerate its power. When St. Igna tius' loyal sons went out to win souls to God in South America, the tribes met them armed. They would not listen to the message of peace and love, but with poisoned arrows awaited them on the river bank. One of the devoted soldiers of Christ took a musical instru ment and commenced to play an old sac...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 58 flowers without perfume." Gentle reader let mo ask you: "What is a more charming picture than to see father, mother, sisters and brothers grouped around an organ, blending their voicos together in the beautiful strains of Mozart or Haydn, or in the better known and beloved melodies of our native land? Thin is a graceful and joyous picture of domestic happiness. The mother takes the accompaniment, the father lends with the violin or sup ports the melody with the bass, while the young groups furnish the soprano and alto parts. What will make a home more attractive, or cause children to grow up in love with domestic life, than such a picture as this? Where home life is musical, children do not seek elsewhere for amusement. Hear the eloquent Fr. T. Burke, 0. P. "This will produce happy nations whose very air will resound with the joyful song of the plow-boy in the field; the milk-maid coming from her work; the blacksmith at his forgo mingling his voice with the h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

w- "(rtpTBiW "P 5Jf THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ."f ? turosque, nestling, as it does, on an eminence having at its feet the treach erous Canadian River and dominating by its loftiness the whole surrounding fertile country. This establishment has all the modern improvements and is capacious enough to shelter from 60 to 70 boarders. From the start, a colony of Francis can Sisters from Philadelphia took charge of the schools. As all other of God's works, poverty, privation, etc. fell to the lot of the good sisters soon after their arrival, but nothing daunted, they put their trust in Him, who in His own good time amply rewarded them. ous tribes such as Choctnws, Caddoes, Chickasaws, Pottawatomies, Kickapoos and Oherokees. Manual labor, of course, is oxactod from all, thus training the girls for home duties. Furthermore, two day schools, one for boys, the other for girls, are conducted by the same sisterhood. Over one hundred pupils attend. God alone knows the good these hum ble daughters of S...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 55 phornalia of the father of lies notwith standing. But what about the material improve ments these self-sacrificing ladios made, together with the practical cooperation of their late chaplain, the much regretted and ever lamented D. Vincent 0. S. B.? They arcsimply marvelous. A magnificent garden of soven or eight acres furnishing all the vegetables necessary to the institution, a fine orchard and vineyard, spacious walks, a wind-mill supplying house and garden with water; these are but few of the improvements, the writer notices in passing. In front of the main building is a the publication of a modest little journal called the "Damien Institute Monthly Magazine" The aim of this small periodical is to promote the groat work taken up by the followers of that noble-hearted hero of Molokai, who sacrificed himself in such wonderful manner for the relief of our unfortu nate brethren on the islands of the Pacific. The little magazine above mentioned is published in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

56 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. country. It is said on good authority that the abbey of Olinda is about to open its gates to the monks who are to work in those regions. 1te Idiaij Advocate Is ft Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plead the cause- of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe ; their progress in education and religion ; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Oillce, Oklahoma Territory Ai'i'KOYKi) uy Right Rev. TIIEO. MEERSCIIAERT, Vicar Apostolic ok Oklahoma and Indian Tkiuutouy. Subscriptions CO Cerils per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. JULY 1S...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 57 but a trifle compared to that of our Very Rev. Prior; and that whore the pagan poet saw in the ocean providen tial barriers between nation and nation, wo on the contrary, see a providential moans of spreading the Gospel and of keeping in touch from the further most end of the earth with the Vicar of Christ. He wound up with a fervent prayer to the better divinities Horace could pray to for his friend's safety and return. Altogether those lectures were a treat to the community and were highly appreciated. Courage, gentlemen call again, for if "curses," like chickens, come home to roost, blessings and " praises," too, have the same happy faculty. The " Kansas Sage" (?) says that the reason why we can't civilize the Indians is because " the critters can't raise a beard." Tt's lucky he did not make this statement before the Woman's Congress! An Oklahoma farmer ordered in his will that " he should be buried with his boots on." Thoughtful for his sole to the last. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

fin 58 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. religion, and above all, by the monthly or weekly "examination of con science" that must precede the mon thly or weekly confession of the boy or girl forming into the man or woman ! It is with deep and sincere regret that the "Advocate " records the de parture of the Rev. Dom Savinian Louismet, O.S.B. During his thirteen years' stay amongst us he has endeared himself to the hearts of many. His quiet, unostentatious, gentlemanly manner has won the esteem of all who rightly understood him. His noble character as a priest of God and Indian missionary shines luminously among his many other virtues. Humble, as it becomes a monk, he pursued the even tenor of his way as God's min ister, drawing the hearts of his people to him by his truly exemplary life. By sermon, by counsel, by teaching, by example, he worked assiduously to make those entrusted to his care (and they were many) love their God and serve Him faithfully. It mav trnlv l said of the good Father that...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 50 ago was printed in almost every news paper in the land. Mother Catherine was born in a war camp on the side of the Rockies only twenty-seven years ago. Her father was the noted Indian chief of the Uncapapa tribe of the Sioux Crow Feather. At the time of her birth the tribe was engaged in a fight with the whites. She was sup posed to be, and was called, the sacred virgin of her tribe, and was given the name of Sacred White Buffalo.' Pier life was supposed to be safe from harm, and it was through this belief that while she was yet an infant she was carried into battle. Her father, Crow Feather, had grown weary of the fighting tactics of Sitting Bull, whom he considered a worthless fellow, and resolved that, instead of at tacking the defenseless white settle ments, the thing to do was to attack the forts and stockades. lie endeavored to induce his fellow warriors to pursue this method, but failing, he announced that he was going to leave them. He started off wit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1895

JiW 60 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TSrwSwpHSIIW honor of being the foundress of the first and only Indian congregation. HOT WEATHER PHILOSOPHY. Don't fret about the mercury, Or wntch it all the time, The old thermometer'on't burst, However it may climb. It doesn't do you any good To count up the degrees, And all your talk about the heat Won't start a bit of breeze. Don't fan yourselfitoo much.1; It makes You hotter when you stop. Don't tell the suffering neighbors that You feel as if you'd drop. Don't drink too much cold lemonade; A glass or two will do. And don't ask everybody "Is it hot enough for you9" Just go about your daily task As calmly as you can. " Don't hurry; take things easy, and You'll be much happier than The chap who groans, and frets, and stews, And fusses all the time. Ju-t follow this advice and you'll Be glad you read this rhyme. Dr. Frigo Successful Efforts to Bring Indians and Negroes into the Church. Which one of the primary laws of the association of ideas is it tha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
x
Loading...
x
x