ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
290 results
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

be," said the attending physician of the insane asylum. While one policeman held poor Ho nig, the other covered him with a large overcoat to hide the exposed lower ex tremities of the struggling victim. And Honig tried hard to explain and escape, and succeeded in the latter at tempt, but minus the protecting over coat. A sudden cry of recognition from the bride-to-be, a stare from the mother-in-law, now rig-id as a stone, and the pitiful glances of his friends, showed Honig that he had been recog nized. But he was recaptured and rapidly borne away in a closed car riage. Funny scenes are said to have taken place in the hospital before the cause of this sudden insanity had been ex plained. Honig never tried again to experiment with new queens, nor has he ever seen again his wife that was to be. —Farm, Stock and Home. SOME BORROWED RECIPES. Chocolate Frosting—Four table spoonsful of grated chocolate, with enough cream or milk to wet it, one cupful of sugar, and one egg well beaten. Sti...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

M The Fashion in Wall Paper. Large and open patterns character ize the new papers. For country houses light backgrounds are used, with lar^e bunches of flowers tossed upon them. Papers in imitation of chintz, cretonne and old tapestries, ri val all other designs in popularity. They are so perfect in their imitation that it is almost impossible to tell them from the real fabric. Papers showing a silk stripe are also the fash ion. A moire effect in the stripe is new and very beautiful. An odd fancy this year for one's den or for the hall or library is to cover the walls with burlap stained and then stencilled. An effect like old tapestry may be pro duced. This costly appearing- cover ing is in reality common bagging dyed and then stencilled in a design to suit the individual fancy. Staining is a sensible treatment for the walls of a country house, after which a stencilled design may be applied. Have the stencil cut in some ancient Greek or Roman design, and color it yourself. The expe...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

NICARAGUA CANAL PROSPECTS. Representative Doolittle, in a pri vate letter to E. C. Burlingame, of this city, writes encouragingly of the prospects for this great work. The following is an extract from this letter: I feel now that we are pretty certain to have a favorable report on the Mor gan bill which I introduced in the house and which was referred to the committee on interstate and foreign commerce, in whose charge it now is. Those who have been opposed to this work of overwhelming importance to our country, we can with safety say are now openly in favor of it. One of the members of the above committee who has fought every proposition of mine as well as those of others intend ed to forward this work, came to me and told me he felt certain now that a favorable report would be made on the bill. Senator Morgan, you know, has ever been the champion in congress of this measure, but of course has con fined his efforts largely to the senate and to the writing of many interviews in its ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

16 Irrigation is King and We are the People! Our great $75,000 cash pumping plant is in operation, irrigating 3,000 acres of the finest land under the sun. Prosser is the commercial town of the lower Yakima valley. 50,000 sheep are sheared here. The great Horse Heaven wheat and stock country of 400,000 acres is at our backs. The wonderful Sunnyside region is before us. The Northern Pacific railroad runs through our midst. • Now we are going to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will r take care of itself. We are going to show our opportunities honestly and truth- fully, and we are going to help the people who come here. No fairy tales will be told. We are here to win, and those who come and stay with us will win, too. We will meet you half way on any fair proposition. Come and see us and our splendid country and opportunities will grow on you, and you will throw off your coat and go to workwith us. Prosser Falls Irrigation Company, address, FRED. R. REED, Manager, prosser...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

THE RHNCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR WEEKLY VOL. 1. NO. 21. PROSPECTS. Now the weeds. How foolish it is, when one has a soil virtually free from all harmful weeds, to permit the few that do creep in to multiply and be come a troublesome and costly pest. The general statement on this subject among arid land irrigation farmers is, "There are no weeds here," and some of them seem to believe it so fully that they don't see the weeds when they do get in, until they are so increased that they have become a veritable barri cade against the crop. Then the al leged farmer wakes up and discovers that there really were some very bad weeds in the field. One anarchist does little harm, but a host of his like be come very troublesome. The new farmer on the clean irrigation land should take this lesson to heart and keep his clean land clean of weeds from the start. Thorough weeding means thorough cultivation, and vice versa. And only by thorough cultiva tion from the beginning to the end of the season can ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

2 the leading Interest-of all this region is agriculture in its broadest sense. This reminds us to say that the pro posed state fair to be held at North Yakinia, the first state effort of this kind, is deserving- of the earnest atten tion and support of all classes of busi ness men. Their future depends upon agricultural development more than upon any one thing —more than upon all other things combined. The busi ness men of North Yakima, of Ellens burgh, of Walla Walla, of Spokane, of Pasco, Prosser, Sunnyside, Zillah and all the smaller places, are even now the owners of fruit orchards, hop ranches, potato fields, etc. They must make agriculture the fad, the fashion, for out of it must come their wealth and position. It is therefore a matter of self-interest to support the ap proaching exhibition by money and by effort in all directions. Those who fear overproduction of fruits should always remember the course of fruit culture in the past. Fact is, that the prices of fine fruit ave...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

North Y.iUima Lumber Market. Rough and sized, per M • II <H> Nn. 2 flooring and rtlßtiO W 00 No. 1 flooring and niHtlc No. 1 finish 20 00@24 00 Posts, each 10 Wood, per cord 4 00 North Yakima Grain Markets. Following are the prices paid to farmers: Wheat. No. 1. per bushel <">0 Wheat, No. 2, per bushel 40 Corn, per bushel 60 Barley, per ton m 00@15 oo Oats, per ton 17 00(yi20 00 The prices at which milling produce is sold are as follows: Flour, hard whoa!, 50th sacks Flour, patent grade. 60ft sacks— So Flour, straight grade, 601b taolCl... SO Flour, low grade. 609) sacks <v> Flour, graham. 101b sacks HO Flour, corn meal, 10tt> sacks Bran, sacked, per ton 13 80 .Shorts, sacked, per ton 17 00 Rolled barley, lacked, per ton — IS 00 Wheat chop, sacked, per ton H6 00© 17 00 Corn chop, sacked, per ton IS 00 Chicken wheat, sacked, per ton. 10 00 The Hop Situation. Barring the severe wind and rain storms of Saturday and Sunday even ings, the hops have had a jolly time o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

4 THE FARMER A THINKER. Ex-Gov. Hoard, of Wisconsin, in a recent address before the students in the school of agriculture in the Ohio university, related and applied this anecdote: A party of soldiers, including my self, were sitting- in a hotel at New Orleans just after the surrender, and we were discussing Grant. Some one said that Grant could not make a speech and was, therefore, ig-norant, for if he knew anything he could tell it; and we all nodded assent. A ne gro waiter who had been raised at the hotel, but who had learned to read, ap proached us and asked that he might be allowed to say a word. Permission was granted, and I remember his dis sertation verbatim, which I will give to you. He said: "According to my observation there are two classes of talent in this world. Both must be thinkers and both must think toward expression. A man who don't think toward expression is a negation. The first class think expression in words; and to this class belong our po ets, our orators an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

STOCK ECONOMICS. The Wisconsin experiment station has been crossing- a Shropshire ram on Merino ewes with good fleece re sults. The clip is almost as fine as that from the pure old Merino, and in every way superior to the Shropshire. The second cross gives a strong-, bright and long wool of good quality. At the same time the carcass is vastly superior to the Merino for mutton. Salt, sulphur and spirits of turpen tine is recommended for sheep troubled with internal parasites. The small hog is crowding- out the heavy lard hog in the western states. The bacon hog is the profitable animal for the grower. Small hams and shoulders meet with readiest sale. The "Horse Breeder" has this to say in favor of the trotters: The breeder of trotters has a great advantage in one sense over the race-horse breeder. The horse he breeds that cannot race can be put to use in road driving or in other occupations, and thus a market is provided that repays the cost of pro duction. On the other hand the race...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

6 FRUIT MARKETING Through Joint Stock Shipping Associa tions and Co-Operative Evapo ration Companies. The Ranch has given several ac counts of the operation of successful organizations of fruit growers for dis posing of their products. Most of the best of them are essentially on a co operative basis, like that of the Snake river association, that made such a splendid record in eastern markets last year. The large majority of the thou sands of creameries and cheese fac tories that have revolutionized the agriculture of the Mississippi valley and middle states are also on the co operative basis. We now abstract from the Pacific Rural Press an account of the Camp bell Fruit Growers' Union, one of the large drying" associations of Santa Clara county, California. Its invest ments are 17 acres of land, a 10 horse power engine, an 18 h. p. boiler, an 80x150 ft. one-story building-, 4 grad ers, 1,500 orchard boxes, 24,000 drying trays, etc. —amounting to about $22,000. The land cost $500 pe...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

A HOLT INSECTS. [All inquiries oonoefning insects or plant dis eases should beaooompattled by specimens, if possible. In lending insects please ob serve the following directions: Adult in sects should first be killed. This can easily and quickly be done by putting the insect for a few momenta in a closed vessel with a few drops of chloroform. Any method, however, which does not mutilate the specimens, will answer. Place the speci mens to be sent in a stout tin or wooden box. packing them withe >tton. so they will not be broken. Caterpillars and other lar val forms should be sent alive, care being taken to put enough of the food plant in the box to last two days. Do not punch holes in the box. The mailing rate on pack ages of insects or plants is 1 cent per ounce. Accompany the specimens with your notes and observations. Write your name plain ly on the outside of the package, and ad dress it to Pkok. V. V. riPBB, Pullman. Wash. THE PEAR LEAF BLISTER MITE. (Phystoptu.s pyrt.) Consi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

a THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It Price—sl.oo a year in advance. Worth —Two gold dollars. Monthly Edition. . r)oe. a year. Conducted by E. 11. LIBBT. Managing Editor, W. W. Cokhktt. Published by the YAKIMA PCJ«LIFn>M MIPVXY. kpitohiai- omens: NoUTH YAKIMA. WASHINGTON. business offices: North Yakhna, Yaklina: Avenue. Seattle, Room 7, Hlnckley Block. Tucoma, 1118 Pacific Aveuue. RANCH SMALL TALK. Send us your name and $1, and re ceive Thk Ranch for a year. A first-class farmers' institute should be held here during state fair week. Who will work up the proposi tion? That Wisconsin county referred to under "Prospects" as appropriating $60,000 for a fair ground is Bayfield county, and the 1893 figures jive it but 7,390 population. And of course neither its agriculture nor its teVritory can compare with that of Yakima! More rain! Well, well! That's a great thing for the Yakiuia country, Raving lots of irrigation ami doin^ wonders for the wheat on the hills. On...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

TUBERCULOSIS IN STOCK. Keep It Out of Central Washington. The report of the state veterinarian that he finds beef and dairy animals in Whatcom county suffering from tu berculosis and pleuro-pneumonia, is alarming- itl the extreme. The last named disease is the dread of the stockman the world over. It has cost the British government many millions of pounds to keep it in check, and the eastefn, middle and prairie states have spent several millions in eradi cating it. How or when the malady became transplanted west of the Cas cades is unexplained. In fact, its ap pearance there has never before been announced, so far as we have heard. If the state veterinarian is sure of his diagnosis, the live stock interests of the state are in sore jeopardy. Instant steps should be taken to prevent the spread of the disease to the dry hill ranges of central Washington, where there is less danger of the disease get ting established than in the moist cli mate of the west coast. The disease is known to...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

10 THE INTERVIEWER. A Trotting Talk About Ditches,'"Op Gar dens," Grapes, and Fruit Trees—The Alfalfa Crop-When to Cut, How to Cut and Stack It—A Ride With Dr. Morri son. Last spring when Dr. Morrison filled Thk Intkkvikwkk's mind with infor mation about the manner of preparing the ground for alfalfa seed, manner of sowing-, irrigating1 and other things pertaining to the crop, the promise was given to look after his manner of cutting, curing and stacking. As I met the doctor on the street this after noon, knowing that his first alfalfa harvest was in progress, I began ques tioning him upon the subject. His horse and buggy were standing near ready for the doctor's prompt answer to a professional call, so he said: "If you want to talk with me about alfalfa we'd best take a drive out to the farm, and we'll get at the matter as we go along." Of course the invitation was the very thing- I had been hoping for. In we jumped, and sped along at a strictly professional gait over the level roa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

But if the dairymen find it so I am glad to know it. Really, so far as my experience goes, I like the after cut tings best for farm stock in general. Fruit growing, hop raising and hay making. You seem to have a good deal of business on hand, don't you? Yes, but you will notice that the three work well together. My haying comes first and second, then the Bartlett pears, then the hop harvest, followed by the winter apples. It keeps my regular force busy all the time, and I have no particular rush except at hop picking, which would occur anyhow. POULTRY RANCH. [Our Poultry Editor is Harry H. Collier, No. 9,")0 C street. Tacoma. Address him on all Poultry matters. J FOWL PICK-UPS. Have you white-washed your hen houses ? If not do so at once. Have you enough green food planted for winter ? If you want eggs then, now is the time to prepare for them. The new Standard of Perfection is now in circulation and every breeder should have a copy. Send $1.50 to this department and receive a copy ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

12 MR. PETERBS OF SCHOHARIE MOR ALIZES. Ye'd like to be a boy again? I wouldn't ye can bet. I'm satisfied JeSt Us I am; ago brings mo no no regret. I'm bavin' fliyr times these days than when I was a lad, An' within' I was back again's a wish I never had. I wouldn't have to go to school for all the cash there be, A-learnin' how to read an' write and studyin' g'ography With that red-headed teacher, with till frownin.' lammin' way, To spank me 'cause I'd mix Maine up with Pennsylvaniay. An'drivin'cows to pasture every day at (i a. m . An' glttln' thrashed for flsliin' 'stead o' keepin' track o' them, Ain't got no sentiment for me. I never did enjoy The trials that I alien got for belli' jest a boy. An' furthermore. I'd ruther have the misery of life I went through when it came to choosin' Marthy for my wife To look back an'shiver bout, jest as I now kin do. Than bavin' it a thing to come to be looked forward to. An' as for chums, I wouldn't swap them lit little sons o' mine For twenty...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

STRAWBERRY DELICACIES. The Indiana Fanner says that Mrs. Hayes when mistress of the White House once gave a luncheon to Wash ington young1 people about which they talked for many years. The table was laid in white linen, with a crimson carnation beside each plate. Straw berry vines and berries filled a low basket in the center of the table. At either end stood tall crystal dishes, heaped with strawberries slightly sprinkled with powdered sugar. After the salads, rolls, peas, crabs, and the usual dainty luncheon menu, straw berry shortcake with whipped cream was served. This was the recipe: Into one pint of flour put a large teaspoon ful of baking powder and one-quarter of a teaspoonful of salt. Sift thor oughly. Rub into the flour four table spoonsful of butter. Wet with a tea cupful of sweet milk. Bake quickly in a hot oven. When well browned spread with butter and berries, whole or mashed, cover heavily with sugar, and serve hot, passing a pitcher of whipped cream with the shortca...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

M as. Prom an Bngllafa Magailne. People called him "Soapy," in ironi cal allusion to his unwashed state. Some would ask him when he was going to sport his two "grays" and retire. The boys hailed him as "Golden Syrup Sandwich," which was supposed to contain a delicate hint at the treacley character of his ordinary diet. Certain it was that Tobias, or, as he was commonly called, Bias, took very little notice of this, but went patiently on, existing- id rag's and hardship. With his donkey tandem and shaky makeshift of a cart, he hawked fish around the countryside, and when there was no fish to hawk he became a traveling- green grocer's shop, and when that line of business was not brisk he sold scouring sand —for you must know that Bias was a man of in finite resources in his way, and was cer tainly the most enterprising and active individual in his village. It was said that he was left an orphan at an early aye; that when offered by the parson the chance of going- to school, he could n...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

It was soon known that the doctor and the parson had gone to Bias. #*####* "Come in," said a feeble voice, and the parson and doctor passed into the hut of Bias, who lay shivering- and coughing- on his straw. The doctor set to work at once to examine the old man, while the parson stood with a question on his face. "It's pleurisy," said the doctor to himfel; then turning- to the parson he whispered: "His time is short; he's dying." The old man seemed to catch the last words, and half raised himself in bed, saying: "I know it sir; I'm dyn'." The parson came beside him. "Could you jist hould me up a bit like, whiles I say my last say?" They raised the old man in their arms, and he began, in a trembling voice: "I've been a misunderstandit man," he began. "Yes," said the parson, "we are all liable to be misunderstood, and to mis understand." "Thetes'nt quite what I ma'ane; I've 'ad a objec' in my life, an' I'vega'aned un. Hark'ee. My father was drownd ed out theere in es bo'oat, all alon...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 9 June 1894

\6 Irrigation is King and We are the People! Our great $75,000 cash pumping plant is in operation, irrigating 3,000 acres of the finest land under the sun. Prosser is the commercial town of the lower Yakima valley. 50,000 sheep are sheared here. The great Horse Heaven wheat and stock country of 400,000 acres is at our backs. The wonderful Sunnyside region is before us. The Northern Pacific railroad runs through our midst. • Now we are going to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will take care of itself. We are going to show our opportunities honestly and truth- fully, and we are going to help the people who come here. No fairy tales will be told. We are here to win, and those who come and stay with us will win, too. We will meet you half way on any fair proposition. Come and see us and our splendid country and opportunities will grow on you, and you will throw off your coat and go to wjrkwitli us. Prosser Falls Irrigation Company, address, FRED. R. REED, Manager, prosser,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
x
Loading...
x
x