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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 24 August 1918

can be put down for .+4OO, that is a four room one. Say your lot or your acre tract cost you $500 and your house $4(10 and the extras thereto $100, it would mean that you could dodge Mi-. High J\ent at once and soon own a comfortable suburban home. The man earning $150 per month would he able io put $50 per month on the out lit. which would wipe out the entire indebtedness in less than two years, and all of that time you would be absolutely independent, whereas as a renter you are ;il\v;iys expecting a notice of a raise in rent or a notice to vacate. What matters it to you in what part of !he city you buy your ground just so it is convenient to a street car line. Let's hope t!i;il you and each of you. who may per chance to read this warning will profit by ii und lake steps to at once head off the High Kent King thai will soon grind you into powder. DOESN'T WANT TO MEET THEM To the Editor: For several days I have noticed the appeal for business and pro fessional men to help as labore...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 24 August 1918

POPULAR PERSONAGES .Mrs. Nettie .1. Asberry of Tacoma has heroine one of the leading Red Cross Work ers of the state. Rev. E. J. -Johnson is still making good with the V. M. C. A. at Camp Lewis. .Mis. \V. L. Presto, who has tiled for the nomination of state senator in the thirty seventh senatorial district has been prom inenl in club circles for ;\ number of years ;ind has reared a large family in this city. Oscar Collins says. "Under 710 circum stances am I in politics, but I would like to see Hob Hodge nominated for sheriff ami it won't be my Fault if lie is not." lie seems to he doing some good work for Boh. Harry Legg, who has been precinct com mitteeman for the past two years, is a candidate to succeed himself. He has h.is looked after the political affairs of the precinct mosi admirably and should be re elected. You and each of you get out and hustle for Harry. I'resident Stone of the Seattle oranch i»f the N. A. A. ('. T. wants every family who has a relative in the army, who...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 August 1918

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS It was like a clap of thunder from a clear sky that the editor hereof re ceived the news last Sunday that segregation at Camp Lewis had been insti tuted in its most humiliating forms. The ink on the editorial in Cayton's Weekly of the day before was hardly dry when presto change, all the good things we had said about Camp Lewis had faded away like snow in June. Bulletin No. 114 had been posted in the camp, which denied the colored soldiers the privileges and accommodation of the Y. M. C. A. building and the Hostess House and in the way of compensation for the loss of those privileges and accommodation a couple of other buildings were designated for Colored Y. M. C. A. and Colored Hostess House. To say that such an order cast a damper upon the buoyant spirits of the colored soldiers as well as the colored citizens of the Northwest is mildly putting it and while the soldiers were powerless to do or say a word in their own defense, yet the colored citiz...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 August 1918

WHAT A DIFFERENCE The white mother of a U. S. soldier who is fighting in France, was legally ejected from the premises, which she was occupying in Seattle, but she ap pealed to the Council of Defense, which body took it up with another of the superior court judges, which resulted in the woman being restored to her former quarters and now she is hap py and content. A black mother of a U. S. soldier, who is fighting in Prance because she gave a white man impudence (?) was tarred and feathered and driven out of Vicksburg, Mississippi, and no one opposed the brutal and drastic order and now the poor colored woman is a wanderer from home and if still in the South afraid to make herself known. Seattle is a Republican community and the judge that restored the white woman to her home because her son was "over there," is a simon pure Re publican. Vicksburg is a Democratic community and the judges and officers of the law would at the risk of their lives try to protect the colored woman now a ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 August 1918

(Paid Advertisement FRED C. BROWN Fred C. Brown, Republican candidate for Prosecuting Attorney of King County, was born in Pennsylvania forty-one years ago. His father was a veteran of the Civil War. He is married and has two daughters, one of whom is in the Government War Service at Washington, D. C. Resi dent of Seattle for twenty-nine years. He has had nine years of active prac tice of law and six years judicial ex perience. While on bench he disposed of 25,000 civil and 6,000 criminal cases. He says: If elected, I shall make it my policy and purpose to co-operate with the National Government in every practical way in conducting the war and vigorously prosecute those that in any way attempt to obstruct its suc cessful termination. I shall not show leniency to the man or men who willfully and with evil intentions violate the law. More attention will be paid to the enforce ment of the laws of criminal conspiracy to raise the price of food; the destroy ing of perishable articles in ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 August 1918

(Paid Advertisement) CALVIN S. HALL . Who was appointed a judge of the Superior Court of King County some month! ago, is seeking the nomination for the same position at the coming primary election on a non-partisan ticket. Wo have known Judge Hall for a number of years and always found him to be a most excellent type of man. He was born and grew to manhood in the state of Illinois where good men are common and he never lost any of his goodness by coming West. (Paid Advertisement) CHARLES E. CLAYPOOL Seeks the nomination for supreme judge and Cayton's Weekly truly hopes he will get it. Two years ago we had occasion to do what we could for his nomination and we are no less ardent in doing that same thing this year than we were two years ago. Charley Claypool is a splendid specimen of the American white man, in fact they are not made better and if a colored man wants to be fair and just to those fair and just to him he will vote at the coming primary election for Wallace Mount, John F....

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 August 1918

GERMANY'S INTEREST IN MEX- ICO'S OIL Literary Digest The hidden hand of the Hun was suspected in the decree of the Mexican Government, dated February 22, which imposed such new taxes and restric tions on oil concessions that some ob servers bluntly called it "confiscation." British and American naval circles were alarmed, we are told, because the operation of the new order promised serious interference with the supply of crude oil needed by battle-ships and destroyers. The situation was made worse by an amendment of July 31 which provided that undeveloped oil lands might be seized by the Mexican Government upon the failure of their owners to make declaration and refusal to submit to the new taxation. But no^ Carranza has had safe recourse to second thought, as the Rochester Post-Express puts it, for he has in effect canceled the decree of July 31. Washington dispatches advise us that while the modification of the decree will hardly be wholly satisfactory, it seems to make concession...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 August 1918

A UNIVERSAL NECESSITY By Edward L. Washington The present great world war has re vealed many things to us that might otherwise have gone unrealized. Among these is the urgent demand for trained soldiers —men who can en dure the hardships of the army life which we all have read something about, and the training does not mean merely the expert handling of guns and the general service of military tactics, but the very fundamental necessity, that is required of our soldiers is phy sical fitness. To be a soldier he must be physically fit, —his vital organs, the heart, lungs, liver, stomach and kid neys must be in good condition to give him the stamina necessary for the hardships of a soldier's life. The question naturally arises— "What shall we do?" There must be a universal awakening and there is, — we note the wonderful improvement in the physique of the school children and even in some adults because of the patriotic spirit of preparedness is daily becoming contagious, because of our ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 August 1918

(Paid Advertisement) PLINY L. ALLEN Who is seeking the nomination for state representative in the 43rd dis trict. Has lived in this district for nearly thirty years. Represented this district in the State Senate from 1907 to 1913. Always identified with progresive and humane legislation. In 1911 introduc ed and passed The Full Crew Bill guaranteeing additional safety to rail road passengers and crew. Has been an employer of Union Labor for over twenty years. Has always taken an active interest in the business and civic affairs of the city. Has acted as Chairman of Draft Board for Division No. 10 since first registration, June, 1917. Will bring to the work of the Legislature a broad business experi ence and a thorough understanding of the problems of our people. Will de mand in the approaching session such legislation as will assist the National Government in winning the war and adequately providing for the return of our boys from "Over There." CHEERFUL NEWS FROM "OVER THERE" Bill Cl...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 August 1918

CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CA YTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South OLD GLORY Seattle did not move to Camp Lewis last Wednesday evening, but it almost. The Atlas Pool Hall has opened its doors for business in the Vrooman Hotel. Burr Williams is doing a little political stunt these days and will ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 September 1918

/ J@a^Zcft&^eeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up. 1' A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the •tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription ?2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TEIEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Ave. South WHAT A SHAME When the colored citizens of Seattle or ganized a Colored Council of Defense to ex clusively look after the entertainment of colored soldiers a more flagrant case of seg regat...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 September 1918

POLITICAL POINTERS Cayton's Weekly, after carefully consid ering the county assessr situation, has reached the conclusion that of those seeking 11k> office Hugo Kelly should be supported and it makes Iliis recommendation despite the fact that the editor hereof and Kelly have little or no use for each other. We do not believe Hull will give to the taxpayers ;i fair administration and if Kelly is not nominated, Hull will be. In our opinion the a Hairs of the assessor's office are in a topsy tnrvy condition and in the interest of the taxpayers should have other than a <mhirt house ring man to look them over. liYmember when you go to mark your Ticket that Elmer F. Connor is a square shooter while Wardall is ad ouble crosser. liotli Clay Allen and C. S. Hall are good iiu»li and you will make no mistake whether you vole Tor the one or the other. Crawford K. White is just as white as his name indicates him to be and on the Itendi he would be everybody's friend. Z. l>. liawson is n...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 September 1918

(Paid Advertisement) VOTE FOR THESE THE KING COUNTY COLORED REPUBLICAN CLUB HAS EN DORSED THE FOLLOWING PERSONS SEEKING REPUBLICAN NOM INATIONS AT THE PRIMARY ELECTION, SEPTEMBER 10, 1918. FOR SHERIFF FOR AUDITOR ROBERT T. HODGE ELMER F. CONNOR FOR PROSECUTING ATTORNEY FOR COUNTY TREASURER FRED C. BROWN W. A. GAINES THE CLUB HAS THOROUGHLY INVESTIGATED THESE MEN AND DO MOST HEARTILY RECOMMEND THEM TO THE VOTERS. THE WOMAN'S POLITICAL ALLIANCE HAS ALSO ENDORSED THE SAME CANDIDATES AND WILL WORK IN HAR MONY WITH THE KING COUNTY COLORED REPUBLICAN CLUB FOR THEIR NOMINATION AND ELECTION. By Order of THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. THE COLORED SOLDIER ON THE SCREEN (By Lester A. Walton) Colored Americans are giving their lives, money, moral support—their ALL to help take the ''germ" out of German. Yet this display of generosity and loyalty has not n.oved the average white American to look at us out ol' serious and unprejudiced eyes. "Over there" they continue to poke fun at the colored American...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 September 1918

pcrior In others are just as much in error as those in the asylums who regard them selves as millionaires, bat who are not. One inisi act in a superior manner to prove his superiority, although usually those wishing to impress you that they are "sueh-a-much" conduct themselves in a decidedly inferior manner. The action of the couple in the si'l may is a case in point. We the colored people of the United stiitcs arc tired of being maligned; we re- Kiil beinir misrepresented. It* this campaign i< make the Negro in America the National clown is due to rank ignorance on the part of those engaged in creating false ideas about us. llicn let them become better versed on the r.icc question. If, 011 the other hand, downright mean i.css actuates these plotters in their per nicious endeavor to magnify our faults and 1o hide our virtues then it. is but to smile. K >r one may just as well try to bridle the tide as to stem the onward progress of the rotated American who is just as sure to p...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 September 1918

S \J PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, "but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Ave. South DROP THE HYPHEN Since Uncle Sam's entre into the Euro pean war the Europeans and their descend ants in the United States have dropped their hyphenated suffixes and instead of Irish- Americans and the like a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 September 1918

There is a growing sentiment among the hciicr thinking white folk of this country, I li.il ii would he to the best interest of the "oveimneiit if there were a few members lo Congress [tailing from the colored popu lation. IT this is to he a popular or "demo cralic" government then all classes must be represented. In our opinion both Bourbon ism and Standpatism are going to fall by III.' wayside at the cnclusion of the present war and the masses take a turn at the wheel. May perhaps they will make a mess of it, hut they cannot make a much worse mess of il than have the classes. Let the people rule. To do his hit, Charley Wood, King Coun ty's efficient purchasing agent, wants to go "over there" and if he does not it will be no la nil of his. There is one thing certain lie will do his duty and his whole duty whether over there or over here, and we truly hope he will be given an opportunity, his fifty-six winters to the contrary notwith standing, to lend a hand to winning the war. In pr...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 September 1918

POLITICAL POT POURI As it always does the primary election brought some startling surprises for the ambitious ones. Jack Stringer for an in stance surprised himself in beating Bob Hodge for the nomination of sheriff. Fred Tuite was not nominated and was as much surprised that he did not get as many votes as both Stringer and Hodge as they were that he got any votes at all. Even Cayton's Weekly as well as the Union Record got stung by Jack Stringer. Bill Gaines did not do a thing to Meßreen, but in that Meßreen was the only person in county that was in the least surprised. Elmer F. Connor is the best campaigner we ever met but he seems to be such a poor vote getter. Mistah Wardall strolled through the corridors of the court house like a strutting peacock the day after election and if ever in the history of King County a man gave greater evidence of owning the world with a fence around it it must have been when Burns and Clancy ran the town. 8. M. Braekett ran like a scared March hare...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 September 1918

STOLEN FROM THIEVES All Knglish lord who had just arrived from England was talking to an American lio.v Scout. ".My grandfather," he said, "w.is <i very greal man. One day Queen Victoria touched his shoulder with a sword .-Hid made him a lord." "Aw. that's notliiti','' the Hoy Scout re plied. "One day Red Wing, an Indian, touched my grandfather on the head with ,i tomahawk and made him an angel."— Hoys' Life. There was a city lady visiting some rela tives in the eounrty and as she was walking down the lane she saw some calves. Thinking to display her knowledge, she remarked: "0 what pretty little cowlets." I Jill, the la nil hoy, came up about that time, heard lior remark's, and said: ""Excuse me, miss. Inii 1 hem's bullets." —Hoys' Life. A gentleman, desiring for some reason to ascertain the number of men employed in one of the Tinted States navy-yards, ap proached the marine on guard at the gate and inquired! "Could you tell me how many men are working in there?" " Yes, si)-." ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 September 1918

'"•*■ PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It Is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Ave. South CLARK COMES BACK Never in the history of Seattle has a news paper change of hands brought forth the general satisfaction as the change of the Post-Intelligencer from the Taylor-Bone ad ministration to the C...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 September 1918

sightly and convenient districts in the city. At present in that sector there are four large apartment houses owned by colored citizens and others are being contemplated. With a majority of the colored citizens of the city owning their homes much of the antipathy of the white man for them will lose out. So long as a certain class of citizens are looked upon as parasites, just so long will there be a prejudice against them by the dominant class. Now as it always has been, it is next to impossible for a colored person to rent a respectable house, hence the necessity of buying. If you plan to reside in Seattle start now to get hold of a modest home and then improve the same from time to time until you have a beautiful as well as invit ing home and this you can do at a very small expense. The man who has lived in Seattle for a quarter of a century and seen the city grow from forty thousand souls to what she now is—ten times that number—4oo,ooo and has rented a house to live in all these...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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