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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

Poultry Yard. PROFITS IN CAPONIZING. A correspondent of the Reliable Poultry Journal writes: I have been an operator for over five years and have caponized over 3,000 birds of most all breeds and crosses in that time. As to the profits over the old way of selling the cockerels on the market, I have found quite a differ ence in favor of the capons. As a rule, early hatched chicks at two pounds are worth I2>^c per pound, or 25c each. When they get to be three, four and five pound chicks, the price per pound falls as the weight advances, until about 25c is as much as they will bring, no mat ter when we sell them. If cockerels are caponized, the larger they get, the higher they are by the pound. It is no trouble to make May hatched chicks weigh from nine to ten pounds by the first of February, if caponized at the right time, and very early hatched chicks will weigh from eleven to1* thirteen pounds. I have had Partridge Cochins weigh thirteen pounds, and have got i2>^c per pound fo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

12 Hpiary. BUZZINGS. BY MRS. CHAS. LEX. Bees are wild over sweet clover. It is the white variety. Mr. L. Parshall, of Fairview, has started out in the bee business with sixteen colonies. May success be his. Mr. Editor, you gave Jane the authorship of Buzzings" last week. Please rectify, as she might not like to have her name used in that way. Curing honey simply means a proper evaporation of the water it contains. This is accomplished in the hive by a high degree of tem perature, and can be done outside by maintaining the same conditions. If you have old comb full of dead bses, do not waste time in pulling them out. If kept dry, many of the bees will fall out by shaking the comb, arid if you put a strong colony on them, the bees will clean them. Some of our young people lately found a bee tree near town. Net proceeds: one large wash tub, two 5-gallon cans and one water pail full of honey. A few days later neigh bor York hived the bses, securing a fine colony. Comb honey should not b...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

3 wins Department. PROPER BREEDING AGE. [Paper read at the meeting of the Kentucky Swine Breeder*1 Association, at Bowling Ui'cent by H. If. Smith ] It has been said of greatness that some are born to greatness, some have it thrust upon them, while others achieve greatness. The hog, I think, is of this latter class— com iug all the way up from his lowly and despised condition in Gadara to his present estate of beauty and ex cellence, rivalling even the horse. My subject deals with one of the most important factcrs in the further development of this important in dustry, viz: The proper age for reproduction in either male or fe male. I assume that no animal should be called upon to reproduce itself at an age that would retard or hinder the growth and best possible devel opment of the individual. The old adage, "big enough, old enough," does not hold good in this instance, ' because at six months a weight of 200 pounds may be -attained, which is sufficient size. But the organs of repro...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

14 Briefly Said. Wool is being sold at 10c in East ern Oregon and at 12c in Montana. J. N. Evans, of Reno, Nevada, last week purchased 3,000 cattle in eastern Oregon. J. M. Boardmau shipped last week 70 cars of cattle from Pendlc ton, Or., to Montana. S. W. Phillips, Wenatchee, re ceived $2.67 net per box for a ship ment ot apples to Seattle. \V. K. Kennedy, Ritzville, says wheat will average 30 to 40 bushels per acre around his town. More than B,ox> cars of cattle, sheep, hogs and horses have been shipped from Oregon since the first of the year. Frank and Lee Lacy, sheep buy ers, sold 25,000 sheep bought in eastern Oregon t j Yeates & Co., Grant county. James Wright shipped 14,000 sheep from The Dalles June 15. Seventeen cars went to Chicago and the remainder to Montana. Ranch and Rangk is a weekly conducted at North Yakima.Wash., devoted to farming and stock inter ests. The editor is Miller Free man, who appears to be qualified to make a success of the paper. — Fourth Estat...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

Markets. HUfTEK. ... Seattle, ranch 12(513c.; WasVcieamry U#M lowa creamery 15c. • Tacoma. ranch 14; creamery lti>£. Yakima. r nch 12@!6c. creamery 17c. SpokiiiHvcreamery 20c. ■•' ' I'HKESK. scuttle, now Wash, cream. KXQillc Tacoma. '• " '•>« spokuno— Full cream, 12@13c, skim milk <J@lOc. ' ■ ■ '•♦•:, ■ • • ' • ' HONKYf . Ynkima— comb 10c. Extracted i»c. PugetSound" l'2c. " lOc. Spokane "■ 15c. ,' '• ■■ " 12c. . KGGS. Seattle. -........%... •• 131M50. Tacoina .-..*.:— '.: ;'H C< Portland P al,l(/ Spokane:...... 13@154. Yakima..' 12AC • ' " ' '' I'OULTKV. Chickens- r c Sea tie.. 1 er doz. £3<T/,3.50 Tacoma -.•• " 3@4.00 Portland " " MO* Spokane'...,.'.-...; V.>! " " 400 ©Ml Ducks— * Seattle " -i«3.00 Spokane — ..., •• ",".4 ;] Turkeys— ;"■ ' . "i ~ .•• Seattle. •• perlbloc. Spokane " l ■>*-'• POTATOES. Seattle.'..'.. E;ist. Washington lOa<l2 Tacoma " ' ,-" ;C 10<ai2 Spokane.. <6®7 Yakima - ■ ■ • ■- ■■ , • .- CATTLE. Chicago— Common steers......: 4.50<...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

t6 to, POLSONWILTON HARDWARE CO. _ _fc \\ So^ • 821-823 Western Avenue, /&i&i \\ fljfc^^f""^ Seattle, = == = - Washington. H \i!/^^L^^^ivilMi Wholesale and Retail U^^^^V^M^^ *^^ • FARM MACHINERY ~^jJPs? lufjl^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Wagons, carnages, baying tools - jirQl^ y^\^ y harvesting machinery, field and Cccrng Ideal Mower, Roller and Ball Bearings/^ garden Seeds. PutTipS, WllHl MJIIS, 4C. /^n&x r n( Jr\ v V^Rfy N Pullman Sleeping Cars Elegant Dining Cars Tourist Sleeping Cars Free Colonist Sleepers TO ST. PAUL. OROOKSTON, MINNEAPOLIS, WINNIPEG. DULUTH. HELENA and FARGO, BUTTE. GRAND FORKS, Through Tickets to CHICAGO, WASHINGTON. NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, BOSTON and ALL POINTS EAST and SOUTH. Time Schedule: WEST-HOUND. No. 1 ...4:50 a. m, EAST-BOUND. No. 2 11:20 p. in. Through Tickets to Japan and China via Tacoma and Northern Pacific Steamship Co. For Information, rates, maps, time-cards and tickets, call on or write d. A. OK AN AM. Agent. North Yaki ma, Wash. Or A. D. CHARLT...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

Ranche and Range. OLD SKKIEH. VOI-. 3, NO. 48. I ÜBW HEKIEH, VOIi. 1, NO. 15. (" BEAUTY DEE 18065. The illustration on this page is of a daughter of Kupidee 4097, the sire of a number ot tested cows, and Beauty of Lakeside 26. 11322. Kupidee is by Duke of Darlington out of Leda 799, "Duke" being a son of the great Kurotas, while Beauty of Lakeside 2d is a daughter of Pilot and out of a daughter of old Dick Swiveller, he also a sire of Pilot. Beauty Dee was dropped May 21, 1882, which would make her just fifteen years of age, and the fact of her dropping an elegant bull calf on April 27th, speaks well for the stamina of her family. When four years and three months of age she produced for J. H. Wal ker, of Worcester, Mass., 23 lbs. 3 oz. of butter from 221 lbs. 8 oz. of milk in seven days. Not only has she a test to her own cred it, but she has two tested daughters, viz.: Me r,i dale Beauty Dee 97738, 14 lbs 9 oz; Beauty of Meridale 114744, 16 lbs Y A oz. This grand old cow is now own...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

2 HortiGulturs. BREEDING OF FRUIT. B\ C. K. HOSKINS. Few nurserymen and horticultur ists are aware of the amount of damage they are doing the future grower by neglecting the breeding and. selecting of scions, cuttings, roots, etc., with the view of improv ing fruits. Nearly all our fruits are chance seedlings or accidents. The parents are seldom known, and be cause of their size, color, etc, are of ten tested in other countries and climates with the hope of getting something better than we already have, which generally proves a fail ure. This article on breeding fruit is written with a hope that it may awaken a new field of thought and practice. It is the writer's opinion if we had only a few nurserymen and fruit growers in this state intel ligently breeding all the varieties that do well here we would soon have much larger and finer varieties than are now being grown. The assertion that future noted fruits must be a native of this state is true. Why? Because our climate, soil, etc....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

Creameries, Dairy Butter Makers, Cheese Makers, Fruit Growers! We are Northwestern Agents and Headquarters for the Following Lines: Stewart's Eclipse Killimechia. L'orroalve Bubllmate Tablets for Preserving Gream SennrntnfK m . i Composite Milk Samples for Baboock Test wream separators. rho greatest Insert destroyer ever dlsrov- Aroacourate because each Jar has the same Very latest patent Embodying the iii.st cn V' Aphis or Hoe and all soft-bodied ln smount of preservative to a grain, andlireou-st imDrovements sects, cut worms. Qjtarplllars, webb worms Convenient because one tablet will keep an »««»»•» tmprovementi. and all pe«U thai iniVsi r.uit Ireen, hop Slol2ount-e sample sweet for two or four Oaii-v nnnda vines, vegetable plants, rosebushes, house weeks, ;ind in the hottest weather UHiry uooos ' and out-door plants instantly destroyed wiin Best, because all authorities pronounce oof- ~„,,,.,. ~,,,,,.„„ ~.,,,, , , KHHmephla without the slightest Injury to roslve sublimate tha t&...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

4 THE FARMERS' COMMISSION. I Paper read by Aiiitm M. stovi-ns before Kill Has Fanners' Institute. | One thing observable about the farm is a restless desire on the part of many persons to leave the farm and go to the cities and villages especially the young people seem ing to think that almost any other avocation in life is more honorable than the farm. They seem to be looking for a royal road to wealth and distinction, oblivions of the fact that idle men jostle and crowd each other for places; that while a few succeed, many eke out an existence at odd jobs and are frequent pat rons of the free lunch counters and soup houses. They seem to over look the fact that integrity, indus try and economy are essential to success in an)' avocation in life; and as to the honorableness of farming, look back through the long vista of time when the world was young. When it was first covered with veg etation, after the various animals and fowls had been created, after the creation of the fishes in ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

definite object; the latter represent barbarism, whose only aim in life is existence. Again, for illustration, take the "Texas steer;" an animal pursued with a lasso rope and a branding iron. Nature has been kind to him in providing him with long legs, light hind-quarters, large should ers, strong neck, large head and immense horns, to enable him to escape from his tormentors and resist attack. Wild in disposition, he is neither desirable nor profitable as a farm animal. The best market for him is the sausage mill, the glue factory and the manure heap. In contrast with him, place in the arena the Shorthorn, the Hereford and Polled Angus, the highest types of beef-producing animals in the world, made so by the intelligent and unremitting manner in which their breeders have exercised do minion over them. They have been carefully selected, generously fed, kindly cared for, and as a result they are symmetrical in form, gen tle in disposition, and furnish the choicest roasts and steaks o...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

6 ¥tis Dairy, THE HAND SEPARATOR. BY FRED RBDIG. The hand separator has come to stay. K. J. Ross, of Bothell, Western Washington, says his separator paid for itself in nine months when milk ing thirteen cows by saving the ex tra amount of butter lost formerly when using the "setting"- system, and he realizes more per pound of butter. He is now milking twenty-four cows and ships his cream to the Queen City creamery, Seattle, and they churn it and market the butter for 2C per pound, minus the job bing market price. He cleared in the month of May from his dairy $84. : This is much more than the average farmer clears. He used to think he was doing close work when he used the '.'set ting" process if he only lost 1 per cent of butter fat. Mr. Ross has the lumber on the ground for the construction of a silo. . : • ,BotJ<fli;Wu*h.-' s MAKING COTTAGE CHEESE. FY I*. W. MOSKI.Y. Following is the description of the plan of operation followed by Leslie Fuller, Braman's Corners, Schnectady cou...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

that from milk set lor cream rais ing the night before, is put into the milk vat, and the operation gone through six times each week. On Friday, the day before the cheese is to be delivered, there will be six sacks of curds. They are then cut into small pieces and worked line by the hands, some thing like mixing bread, as Mr. Fuller expresses it, and salt is at the same time mixed in. The salt ing is done by taste, but by weight would seem to the writer a better way. Mr. Fuller thinks a machine for grinding the curd would be an improvement* After the curd is salted and mixed it is moistened just enough with sweet milk to make the bits of curd stick together, when it is formed by hand into balls, though Mr. Fuller is thinking of getting a mold for that operation. These balls of cottage cheese weigh a lit tle over three-quarters of a pound each, or about ten pounds to the dozen. They are then packed into boxes four inches high inside, with hinged covers, nicely painted out side. Each ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

8 Ranche and Range. la th« Interests ef (he Farmers, Horticulturists and Stockmen of Washington, Oregon, Idaho. Montana, I'tah and Hritish Columbia. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association- for Washington. Oregon, Idaho and Hritish Columbia. Subscription (in advance) ... $1.00 Per Year. riILLER FREEHAN, - - ■ Editor. Address all communications to RANCHE AND RANOB, BozflM, North Yakima, Washington. EDITORIAL NOTES. What a world of wealth it means to the new North west to harvest the bounteous crops of grain that are now assured. We are getting- very cheering reports of the bright prospects from all the grain raising districts, and while we also receive a few reports of injury by drouth, they are from unimportant secticns and have little influence in making up the grand total of our production. The prospect for good grain crops is making busi ness lively for the agricultural implement men. Lead ing wholesale dealers of the near-by seaports tell us that they are fair...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

De Laval "ALPHA" Cream Separators Creamery and Dairy JVlaehinery and Supplies. T" "jS '" " Alpha NoMr^" What the 1897 Wisconsin State Experiments Show: »«O|pft^w Belt Separator. That many "Alpha De Laval" machines in every day use are skimming as wonder ..-■ .nfiifcJ fully close as .03; that the average is from .05to .065; and that but one machine out of ■jT-'-iS^ those personally tested by Prof. Farrington was leaving more than .1. ■HfeSJH'^ / ' That the "Reid-Danish" machines are leaving an average of three times as much JURi^eL ejjtl fat in the skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." . SfiPiill3 'tm*/t\ That the "11. S." machines are leaving an average of three times as much fat in the vSKJHF®® tMsMlmjA skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." % WSP "^Ti#J ' ' That the "Alexandra-Jumbo" machines are leaving an average of four times as WkW iinicli fat in the skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." _ IwJ! 'X^ JPII That the "Sharpies-Imperial Russian" machines are leaving an average ot live Ml >...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

IO Ws\® Flocks. SHEEPMEN'S MEETING. On Saturday the sheepmen met in North Vakima in response to the invitation of the Northern Pacific Land Company, to consider the proposition to kase the odd sections owned by said company and used as winter pasturing- and lambing grounds for the flocks of the sheep men. The sheepmen held that it would be objectionable to accept the clause in the agreement requiring all sheep and wool to be shipped over the Northern Pacific line. It was concluded that unless the company could guarantee that other stock would be excluded from the land they would not lease, and an agree ment was drawn up which they all signed (about twenty-five being ing present) to stand together and refuse to accept the company's proposition. They were then in formed that if they would not ac cept the land allotted the company would allow the land to go to out side sheepmen. The sheepmen made it plain that they would vig orously oppose such action. But we learn that there are sever...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

Poultry YarJ. When you build that new poul try house, construct it in such a manner that you will be enabled to clean out the droppings with little trouble. Make the perches mov able, horizontal and not too high from the floor. A good cement floor is a little the nicest for the roosting room, but a close, smooth board floor will answer all purposes. A little dry sand or loam will in crease the value of the fertilizer and at the same time make the ma nure easier to handle. The rest of the hen house floor should be cov ered with fresh, dry leaves, cut straw or chaff, into which all grain should be thrown, causing the fowls to get their much-needed exercise. Idleness and over fat is the great trouble with fowls at this time of the year, and if allowed to mope around they are liable to get that much-to-be-dreaded habit of feather pulling. The secret of success is largely in keeping the fowls in con tinual exercise. One of the most vital matters connected with poultry rearing at this tim...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

12 Hpiary. IMPORTANCE OF GOOD QUEENS. BY J. \V. ROUSK. I wonder if even one-half of the beekeepers realize the importance of good queens, as upon the queen more than any other one thing de-* pends a successful crop of honey. I have never seen a season in my beekeeping experience but what some colonies could at least make a living, but I have seen some colo nies that made a poor living even in a fair season. As bees do not make honey but gather it, of course they can do nothing when there is nothing to do on or with. If the queen is a good breeder, that does her work at the right time, in the right way, her bees are most sure to get something. It is hard to convince some that there is as much difference in queen bees as there is in milch cows, or any other kind of stock. While some cows are good milkers, others are not worth keeping. So it is with queen bees. Some colonies are kept from year to year, and nothing is ever obtained from them. When the old queen gives out, another is rea...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

Swims Department. WHEN HOGS ARE RIPE, KILL THEM. Gov. Rusk, of Wisconsin, hap pened to drive over the state line once into Minnesota, looking at the farms. He was particularly struck with one farm, on which he found everything in first class order, and, riding up to the house, inquired the name of the owner, when a tall German came out and gave his name as Theodore Louis. "What do you regard as the greatest wealth-producing agency in agriculture?" the governor asked him. "The hog," was the sententious reply. "Upon what do you base this statement?" "He lifts more mortgages than anything else." "How long would you keep a hog?" asked Gov. Rusk. "I would not keep him; I would kill him. "When?" "When he is ripe." "When is he ripe?" "When he is fat." "Wouldn't it pay to keep a hog for two or three years. "I tried that once," said Louis, "I took a hog once in the fall and weighed him, and I took my corn and weighed it. When spring came the corn was all gone, and the hog weighed about what ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 July 1897

14 I^risfly Said. Colin Cartnichael was offering yesterday in North Vakima 9c tor hops. H. S. Emerson & Co., of Tacoma, have opened a commission house in vSeattle. A. McMaster and K. J. Cheal have commenced the operation of a creamery at Monroe, Wash. Louis Lachmuud, of the firm of Horst & Lachmund, has started for New York to be gone two weeks. New alfalfa hay is in the Sound markets from Yakima. It is being laid down there for $6 and $S per ton. C. B. Ljvermore, of Wenatehee, is in the east arranging to bring out a party of farmers to view the We natchee valley. Yakima, Walla Walla and We natchee peaches have reached the Sound markets. The heavy crop in Southern Oregon keeps the price down. H. Bolster has been appointed manager of the Spokane Fruit Fair. The premium list is being prepared and will shortly be in the hands of the people. M. McLennan, the well-known sheep buyer, has arrived at North Yakima, where he will make his headquarters for the summer. He intends to inv...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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