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Elephind.com contains 317 items from Polynesian, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 June 1841
Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 June 1841
Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 July 1841

THE A M9niMrnjiiunui M . y ..-- ..."'"''"""w.-..r.u.... JABSVES, Editor TYTITIYI A ;7' J I1 Y. 22? ISIS. . Vol. 1. m) the North American Review for Of. 1810. Account of t lie Visit of t!:o Friwli Fri -.itf Ar. La tli.t S.:nl vih Island, July, 18.J9. Ilouo j, 1S.J!) Sno. pp. (2. kt tlie S ind.vicli Island. Rem irix on an Ac- Bt of the Tr in icion connected tin; i.-i' Ik; Artoiiii-e Rennrks on t!io Manif.Mto nnd Tre ttino'it of the Mi-sionurie. Hawaii in Spec J, Vol. II. No I, it 4. J.uiiiiry l.jtli, 1SI0. jliilu, Sandwich Isl.ind.. U.J. Howard, pp. 100. first of these pamphlets is from the ;of Mr S. N. Caslle, one of the As- Sht American Missionaries resident in Sandwich Islands. It contains nn ao- I r,r.,...i i i... .t - . t tit nvnvn Ihf innulwn nml h;ir:lirwc . ' ' J wines and brandies shall not be prohibit ed, and shall not pay an import duty high er than five per cent, ad valorem. The author of the first of these pam phlets thinks, that, in this proceeding, in justice was done t...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 July 1841

16 THE POLYNESIAN. iW SELECTED. General Washington's idea of Pro pane swearing. Dedicated to all Officers, Military or Civil. Kxtract from the orderly book of the army under the command of Washington, dated ut head-quarters, in the city of New-York, Au gust 8, 1776. 'The general is sorry to be informed, that the foolish and wicked practice of pro fane swearing, a vice heretofore little known in an American army, is growing into fash ion; he hopes the officers will, by example as well as influence, endeavour to check it, and that both they and the men wiljl reflect, that we can have little hope of the blessing of heaven on our arms, if we insult it by im piety and folly; added to this, it is a vice so mean and low, without any temptation, that every man of sense and character detests and despises it." Laconics. I used in early life to long to be a martyr to have some grand opportuni ty of honoring God, of renouncing all for him. I would hope there was some piety in the feeling, but t...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 July 1841

n L-U J. JAKVE2S, EiHtor. SATVISWAY, JULY 10, 1S1I. Vol. iVo. 5. 1M re. tw ... Pi HE .NE'vT.R LOOK SAD. N vor look sad riolliinjr'rf so b.id A go tin-? fimil iir with sorrow; Trent him to-day in a ctivalinr wsty, And he'll seek other quarlc.s to-morrow. I.o;v: you'd not weep, would you hut peep At the bright side of every trial; IV'une, you'll find, is of en niot kind. When (hillinir your hopes with denial. Let the sad day carry away ft. 4 own little burthen ofso'row; Or you may miss half of the bli. That conios in the lap of to-morrow. p When hope is w rocked, pause atid inflect I II error occasioned your sadnefs; J If it hi' so, hern ifter you'll know ! flow to steer to the harbor of gladness. . 'MiivntTi'M' and i:u.n r..o:M,r.i). j: madam t: ji'not, nrciif.ss n abbaxteb Hut what a change for the young, pret ty, and fashionable lady, spoiled from in fancy by loud and continued praises of her beauty and talents. Monsieur de la Tour-du-l'in was extravagantly fond of his wife. At the...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 July 1841

18 THE POLYNESIAN. Jul for cocooneries and reeling houses required in less favorable climates. The agent ar rived from the United States in the spring of 1839, and found the plantation in a flourish ing condition, and well stocked with trees. He brought with him the best varieties of the American worms, including the mammoth white, and yellow, and the pea-nut, also a line lot of the Morus Multicaulis. These wore planted immediately, throve well, and were so highly esteemed, that cuttings of but two buds each, were sold to others about engag ing in the same enterprise, fur from one to two dollars the slip. The leaf grew beauti fully, thick and heavy, and to a great length, sometimes measuring fourteen inches. It only advantage by way of food appeared to be its size and rapidity of growth. Tho worms fed with equal desire upon all the other varieties. It was then concluded to let the black mulberry run out, and to plant the latter in its place. After the first year it was discovered th...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 July 1841

1 THE POLYNESIA N 19 evening, and passed a delightful ixri on rm crtA in rromra ttrKw.K I. ' c-7 n - - - - amused their early years, when amid is and in the homes of their native je Don Quixote brings the distressing gence of the death of Mr II. Puty, of Vm of H. Puty & Co. of this town. Mr (Vas an active and enterprising nier- and his loss will be much felt in our community. His disease was the fever, and he died a few days before on Quixote arrived at Tahiti. Jer the bark left Valparaiso, the Small proke out on board, and five- Hawaiian jn soon fell victims to it. On her arri i Tahiti, she was put in quarantine, and nmunication allowed with the shore for lys. She brings from that place a clean health. jf political news we have no later dates Jby the Gloucester. Queen was absent from Tahiti, and government in much disorder. We have j of riots on shore, in which Mr Black y the American Consul, was injured by i natives, and in consequence thereof, had Itid down his flag. The part...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 July 1841

20 THE POLYNESIAN. hi:m:ct i: i . Private Fortunes in Ancient Times. Crcrsiis possessed in landed property a for tune of ,?(X),tM07, besides a large, sum of money, slues, and lurniture, which amount ed to an equal sum; he used to say, that a citizen who had not a fortune sullicient to support an army or a legion, did not deserve the title of a rich man. The philosopher Seneca had a fortune of 2,00 ty.HJJ. Len tuliH, the soothsayer, had A)0,Q0()l. Ti berius, at his death, left 2.3, 5 JO, 000, which Caligula spent in less than twelve months. Vespasian, on ascending the throne, estima ted all the expenses of the state at .3,.X)0,0U0. C;esar, before he entered upon any ollice, owed 2,u!).3,000; lie purchased the friend ship of Curias for 500,000, and Lucius Tau lus for 1300,000. At the time of the assas sination of Julius (tesar, Anthony was in debt to the amount of 300,000; he owed this sum at the Ides of 31 arch, and it was paid before the Kalends of April; he squandered 147,000. of t...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 July 1841

Y C . . v. ted ier; TP -1 CJ Tf A TIT Jar & Mj M.M. MIA 3. 1 lk aj. re. (. Hi pi . J.lKYKtf, Kilifor. S.VriJSSIAV,- JVBjY 17, 18-11. If 'A ram 1 ltd Si ithcrn Literary Mi;cncr, Tiii:ro.vi::ior nr.ATii. I,if(ir death! ( ) wfiitii tlw) i wil: in thy tcrrifie power, 1 '-:i'.tl uii:;d'lt;ii in nii.vui. o.iio lmut $ Ami all who-i; id is !i c nh, iy .ij 'fi-i'-li tiiii myiiads ut i tio sei, i W'lt a, id iitr .-iibiiiii ho.,- to ihee. t 4 All clinics confu.s. thy reii;n 7 "rilu and people, civ ili.cil uii.l rude, ay fccne, in i leeful bolitude. 2 And on the hounding nuin, I Isiiik 'neath thy dominion firm nnd fast, I Uinemomuered generations passed. 'O'er all thou rnl'st elate " "'tli'ju ike, uvalariclie, and la"i form, ,i" a. id limine, pestilence and siorin, .iiiu cup menu nc; Vol. 55 ffo. 0, nnrirt.mmw 'j UMiiim n.i f-idtd revenue, and biot. zeal, V J madly liamst iiie j.nv, oi b, I ire'st the steel. Y); " yVhen war awakes in wrath, 11-3 ride t fiii iou3 on t lie urrow'h , ing;, L b...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 July 1841

00 THE POLYNESIAN. I: fullv, be-ued the vouthto accept of a ! habit the Abbey of Monttuartre, where l.ouis-d'or". " Von "will meet with some she was treated with all beiitting delicacy voung gentlemen wiiiiiu," said lie, " with ,aud distinction, but not permitted to go whom vou mav wiIi to take a hand at beyond the convent walls. The lovers cards. 'The number o!' m v coach is I I 1. ' found means to correspond. One of their Vou can find me mil and repay me when- letters was intercepted, and it is even luut ever you please." d that a plan of elopement was discover- The worthy Jehu was some Years after- ed. A duel was the consequence, with wards made coachman to the lVmccss one of the fiery relations of the princess. Sophia of France, thromrh the rceommeii- Letorieres received two sword-thrusts m ihitionof the handsome vouth he had so his right side. His wounds were serious, I'fMiproiisl v obli red. ' i i I ..I I ... . ... . !., . iititml 1 1 it 1 1 ii i 1 1 L.'iri Another instance in...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 July 1841

II. ?3 'I I !),i!iii - description, ami perhaps all till: ivl .-train a muscle. Willi them a joke j !(.; they love it as well i.t their own use as ut another's; hut lei him look out Lrt3tln! whole laugh tin IK d upon himself. i are peilect adepts in blackguardism, would stand professors to the dcnrcn of files' themselves. In many points they like the genuine man-oi'-wai '.s man thev and siag while they have enough to careless of tin; iii.itiow ; spending all raise upon their friends. Tims, man' Jllow who earns from $ K) to ..30 per an- V and y t can scarce boast a shirt to Ins k; hi- friends and relatives having coz- d all his wages from him. When the itations wore first started, it was ctideav 1 to keep the 'workmen clothed, hut it teJ vain labor. A Hawaiian will work he suit that nature gave him, which being :rr color, is perhaps utter all the best ted for that purpose, atid does not wear in washing. As to clothes, they are on- r special occasi mis, kept tor Sundays or i jctid. 1 ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 July 1841

10 T T II K I'ULYNKSi A X ,v E 1. L C T E I ) . A Vatso s Toigher. Old Parson M., of , Worcester county, used so;mtimes to be absent on a irus.siotiary tour. Once on a time, having just returned from one of these excursion?, he f und his congregation quite drowsy, and wishing to u'dke than vp, he brolto'off in the rnidst of hi sermon, and be wail to tell them what wonderful things he had seen in York State; among other won ders, he said he had seen m mstrous great nnisc tito.s at larj'e that many of them would welsh a pouud! The people were by this time a.val. 4i Yea;" continued Parson M, 41 and moreover they are ollen known to ciimb trees and bark!" Tho next day one of the deueons called upon him, telling him that many of tie breth ren were much scandalized at the biir stories he told the day before: " What ttoriesr" says Parson M. " Why sir, you said that the musruiitoes in York State w ie so large that many of them would weigh a pound!" Well," rejoined the minister, " 1 do really...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 24 July 1841

,1 POL fir MIA 1 A N w r ' J. JA.ISVJUS, ZicKtor. Vol. S. IVo. 7. post?:. f" THE tfiT.CTllL si Ml. (following lines :ir translated i'roni :i German po- A 1, by do .ciiiu, written hi my years ao. The horhtd then iinie ru ison lo e.vpect so piosaie u niiii'Mii i ms xn',i(.-n UiXMin, a ihe arrival ol l.u ithc Hello Poule :i pilot from the Channel had arrived the (lav before. As this shii brought me no now insiruclions, I immc- oii board, the c ftin was rcceiu'd between which was bound lordlier witli bands of two milks of officers under arms, and car- . ison, which it required four 'and a half ried on to tlu (waiter elceh. u Inch l:ad hours' labour to reenvn. Tim nurnmn diately occupied hnsell in execut'm." the ! been arraiured as p, c!iic!c ardentc. Ac- ' difficult v of this operation indnrrd il.n .orders I bad originally received. M firsf cording as von bad ord red me, a jzuard undcrsi-'nrd En'dish roinnninniT in hum ui iwio.-uouis, vmii, u,o rwiiniimoi Au.-eare was to put .M.de CJiab...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 24 July 1841

f 26 T H K POLYNESIAN. July scd ehn t i . i W l;C 1 l.iV U tin ;i now ler:Ien co.Tn s :nt fro was likewise c.-r.:f illy ?":!. L The new ebo'V en.'n.i was r.ml the kov handed to l!:o rrench com mhAoi.vr. The English co:ii:.;-io,;c;-then declared to tiio l?ic; rc;!i commhsio:- tlint the disinterment huvm ..; " t c i 1, ' I . I with Ion-winded theolo- commencing nt ilanapepc, una extending rf 13 .... I ft I.. I .,'.. tVltllttlM WliSnlr.nl.. .. 1 J eo:,st :vici:ce of the thrciusot liio I me-r gicu. , . mccinitous sid ui re c ::e!oscel in hoots, liut in not till its columns os from iiMn-ii I. ; -,.,m ,1:,. four la,. H-o, ,,, Msil-Ic , ,o l-yi-la,,,,,. hear " " 0 , e lu igLt of COOJ fee,, U t, TK" Mu of tluwo Iocs,,,,;,,, ' "" "'I T 'd.Xel'icf TI,U upland for twenty rnilo, on t! of .'.all n i;,, ami !, mil were ,: MM mil, . . ,Ur:, 1 .. and I , , ,,, a , il !! fic.it. To nut it::ioii ol tin: ; such news ns will interest them, . ill have, a ,ce u ! 1. :. ! . !il ti..i- c.vil'in K nmlJ. l ,...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 24 July 1841

I hi. T II E POLYNESIAN. 27 Vv valleys, iiiul small ranges of. inoun-l Kauai is 8i, near the temtLM-aieTr.nr. ilV:it"r.T, irv,.,',.,,;,.,I',i, . witli line rolling upland betveen then, a perpetual utruggle seem, i exist bcUcen nv 'inciu' I J nr. 1 . o';,J!itw h nV.'is.'L-d 'l:! aalsthe in'cri.ir it becomes well wood-, the Libit ,t the mlder clm.es and the i.e.- ri'rt.t r.r be f,-:-:dh.- h.,.'rn- n!:,:iv ni.l all of it watered by numerous stream lenahd green uftho tropical; omc trees shed of the .uv ; ,;v. s of his V; -li:::'::;. Jet ., tome tumbling from the maintains l 1 J their Jon en to a great extent in autumn, and him bear it i,l KV-i.rc. or eh'r rai - ! ! t!y aJes, some of which ate of at height ; await the jdiowers of spring to clothe them lo.-waid iml n-.Ao him..-: If ami his :ti. v- beauty, i he so uniting at their base, i anew, while others retain their old tlrca ai;d.a's k'.uuii. u::d my Mr it. ho v.ii! firci.ig t!eir way through dark gorges, ( vig r without aay apparent ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 24 July 1841

THE POL Y N E S I A N . Jl'LY 23 K L i: 0 T E l . LiTKiiAitv Statistics. In the library of Mr Borers, the poit, r.t lii.i hot. so in St. James's 1'iaco, London, h the original agree ment between iMiitun and his publisher, Samuel Syiuons, in HUG, for the copyright of " Paradise Lost." It is written on one page of foolscap, signed by the contracting parties, and witnessed by 41 John Fisher," and 4 Benjamin Greene, servant to Ml Mil ton." The autograph of the great poet, not withstanding his biindncss, U remarkable regular and distinct. This interesting relic, we need hardly say, U carefully preserved by its distinguished owner: it is framed and glazed, and occupies a prominent, place on the walls of the; cla -i-ical and hospitable man sion oi the i'oet ol .iitiiory-. .Mr lingers we believe, gave, .seventy guineas lor this relic! For the poem itself Alilton received ten pounds, live b"ing paid in advance, and the other live at the expiration of two years, when 1:30.) copies hi.. I been...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 31 July 1841

THE FOLYI IAN , j. JAItVES, Editor. p oetiltV 5 l or the Polynesian. 3 nrroi i rrrrinvsi op a MML-vn ilv thought of thee is oye combin'd h'ith loveliest things' on earth we find. Aith living gems of lustre rare. JVitli flowers, of hues surpassing fair; Ji'ith snow-wreath of the purest white, ust tinged with blush of moon's sweet light, JVith dews of heaven so free from stain Jt seems just fit for heaven ugain! y feelings arc as fresh and rife 'ith ore as in the morn of life; ind still 'mid griefs unpitjing shower glow with a more celestial power. 3 flowers n sweeter breath diffuse flien beat to earth with heavy dews, liy form and features so refined, tcni a fit garment lor thy mind; nd all thy face, with feelings fraught, So changes with each change of thnimht- w D O nd with its mind-illumin'd rnvs. Each movement of thy soul betrays; fk n i tils ft n lnrlit . . ! 1 A !uui unc a luuiaiu ll Strums o wrap yet grace its angel gleam. Ii! bound in dulness' firmest fold! ho could that beam...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 31 July 1841

THE POLYNESIAN. 30 thosawhoare with him. Such qualities tho.su men since they were ' rescued, and ics on the const of Africa ; giving an exhibited in the exercise of overwhelming' the hope is not a groundless one that they ample to nil nations in this respect, which, power are most salutary. Negotiate, mav still be returned to their native land, if fairly followed, cannot fail to produce treat with' whom and where ? . . TDicta- ' the most effective results in breaking up Iiaii innol nn.c I ,.,-.,.. v. r I .n nn ur t Ihn I ' N 1 I r. J I I l ' I II1U3U Ul ll.t "I IIIIUUIIII day. If possible, let there be no more destruction of life, no taking possession of empire; but henceforth, as in other coun tries let direct access be had to, and inter course maintained with, the cinperor and his court ; and let the foreigner enjoy the same protection and the same immunities here, and be held responsible in the same manner, as is usual among the most fa vored nations. Such an achievement, good a...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 31 July 1841

THE POLYNESIAN 31 Kb all the approaches to Canton were car- j but decisive steps and severe measures will j W . . . . It . ntniti Jiilafitlklfi A . . A I I I m, wiui iin..inicii Hssau-:inuuce them to come to terms. Fear will .drive them to negotiate, but only to deceive, ana ineir late altack is the fullest proof of a mst treacherous disposition. The war on the part of the English has thus far been conducted in the most humane manner pos sible. Indeed it may reasonably be conjec tured that if it had been prosecuted with the greatest vigor from the first, nnd a decided impressjon made upon the empire, its result would have been more to the advantage of both parties. The Emperor is surrounded itli counsellors who advise him to the harshest measures It is impossible to fore tell the result of the struggle, but be it what it may, there is little probability of the trade being renewed until victory has crowned the lis, tnougii mi-ymin;se uKitnaeu mem with iniicss By these successes Canto...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 31 July 1841

32 THE POLYNESIAN. SELECTED. Sto.nf. Meal t;si:n in China for food in timb of Famine. In the vast empire of China the most terrible-families some times occur. Men of wealth have been reduced to sell their wives and children, furniture, and houses, to procure food, and that food, perhaps, nothing more than the rind of a tree, or a decomposed stone found occasionally on the mountains. Tim Chinese assert that this stone is a miraculous production. However, there is little doubt that it is merely a soft whit ish stone pulverized by the sun and air, aiid, if sought for, to be found at any time. M. Biot has ' lately taken pains to inquire into the causes of those calamities which drive un industrious people to such extremities.- China contains immense plains in a high state of cultivation, with large rivers running through them, the beds of wliich are obliged to be kept clean, by great labor, from the pcipetual deposits. While these rivers are restrain ed within their due bounds by the ar...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
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