ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Free-Lance, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 313 items from Free-Lance, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
313 results
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 5 August 1905

=^ Ww OUr f&> — =-•=■ - GROWLERS. And now the theatrical trust has collared the theatrical transfer business in Norfolk. We arise to ask, “What next?” In down-to-date cities the street cars run all night and according to the speed governed by law; the barber shops keep open Sunday morning, saloons are given certain privileges, keeping out the obnoxious “social clubs.” and there is a liberal form of government. Aren’t we still in the provincial class? ♦ * * H« * The roof of the “improved” stationhouse sprang a leak during a recent rain storm, flooding the cells and corridors. This is the $17,000 job we heard so much about. Did you get your part of the rake-off? He He He He He The city terminal of the Ocean View division of the Norfolk Railway and Light Company is in West Main street. Who gave the octopus the right to monopolize and block a public thoroughfare? Mightn’t the “good government” council investigate ? The Portsmouth Star says “Work the criminals.” We...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 5 August 1905

6 QUIETUS. Man and his strife! And beneath him The Earth in her green repose; And out of the Earth lie cometh, and Into the Earth he goes. O, sweet at last is the Silence; (). sweet At the warfare’s close! For out of the Silence he cometh. and Into the Silence he goes. And the great sea round him glistens, And above him the great Night glows. And out of the Night he cometh, and Into the Night he goes. —WILLIAM WATSON. WEARY THE WAITING. There’s an end to all toiling some day—sweet day! But how weary the waiting—weary! There’s a harbor somewhere in a peaceful bay Where the sails will be furled and the ship will lay At anchor—somewhere in the far-away— But it’s weary the waiting, weary! There’s an end to the sorrow of souls oppressed, But it’s weary the waiting, weary! Somewhere in the future, when God thinks best, He will lay ns tenderly down to rest, And roses will bloom from the thorns in the breast— But it’s weary the waiting, weary! There’s an end to the world with it’s stormy fr...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 5 August 1905

What is the Earth to Infinity—what its duration to the Eternal? Oh, how much greater is the soul of one man than the vicissitudes of the whole globe! Child of Heaven and heir of Immorality, how far from one star hereafter wilt thou look back on the ant-hill and its commotions, from Clovis to Robespierre, from Noah to the Final Fire? The spirit that can contemplate, that lives only in the intellect, can ascend to its star, even from the midst of the Burlal-groud called Earth, and while the sarcophagus called Life immures in its clay the Everlasting. LORD LYTTON. There is a sense of hearing that the vulgar know not. LORD LYTTON. THE IMMENSITY OF HUMAN IGNORANCE. The greatest interpreters of science have even been the humblest, because alike, “in the choir of Heaven and the furniture of earth,” they have recognized the immensity of human Ignorance. REV. F. W. FARRAR. AN AUTUMN PICTURE. The woods were beginning to assume the first fair livery of autumn, when it was beautiful without dec...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 5 August 1905

8 THE MOSQUITO AND OTHER PESTS. (continued from page 3) because the life of a mosquito ends after its first full meal of human blood. The infernel little pest approaches the person in the most wary and strikingly cunning manner. It first flies to some elevated corner several yards distant, from which point it carefully watches its victim and apparently plans its attack. It actually seems to be endowed with some sense which warns it that it is being watched, for it is rarely a move will be made so long as the eye is kept full upon it. If. however, the direct glance is removed, and observation confined to side vision, it will be observed to leave its elevated position for a nearer point of vantage, and this next point will invariably be under a ledge or round a corner out of sight of the individual off whom it contemplates a meal. This latter position will in turn be maintained with remarkable patience, until again thinking the coast clear it makes another move and very likely takes i...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 12 August 1905

Vol. I. No. 21 Secret Sessions by the Executive Committee. The City Democratic Executive Committee, dominated by the “good” government faction, held a meeting the other night. James Barclay moved that the press be excluded. Walter H. Taylor, one of the minority members of the committee, objected to the reporters being frozen out, stating that the committee would transact no business that the public was not entitled to, and made an appeal in behalf of the press. Mr. Barclay and his associates, being in the majority, won out and the reporters were told to get on the outside. Here is a committee elected by the people to transact the people's business in a manner that the people shall know all, yet we are presented with the spectacle of this committee sitting in judgment behind closed doors, the people being ignored. But the freeze-out proved of no avail, since the press did get the proceedings of the meeting, and these proceedings gave to the people the idea of what the “good” governme...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 12 August 1905

7VVr. MEYER KOTEEN Legislative Candidate Mr. Meyer Koteen, candidate for the Legislature from this city, and the subject of our sketch, is an excellent example of a self-made man, and a forcible illustration of what will and determination, coupled to intelligence, may accomplish. The Free-Lance being looked to for expression on all political matters, our representative called upon Mr. Koteen and prevailed upon him to furnish its readers with a sketch of his career. To this he kindly assented, likewise permitting, though some- what reluctantly, the reproduction of his photograph. Mr. Koteen is a pointed conversationalist and has some strong original opinions concerning politics and other things. One of his theories is that every man has ambition of some kind; it may be ambition to do something, or it may be ambition to do nothing, but it’s ambition all the same. That he is strictly in the former class his aspirations clearly indicate, and that his ambition is justified his present st...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 12 August 1905

lit tfte ©rama t s Heaftn» By Phill Space. This is the season of the year when the typewriters in the offices of the theatrical trust are clicking merrily, grinding out yards of the advance notices that will soon be spread through the provincial towns, telling the people of the “great and grand” show that will appear at the town hall or op’ry house on such and such a date. The Reubens will he told of the dashing prima donna and the hot-stuff souhrette; of the polished comedian, the finest villain and the most accomplished heroine that ever chewed a ham sandwich. The country editors will soon he in receipt of a large bunch of stuff playing up some attraction that may have taken to the railroad ties last season; which has been “reconstructed” and which is now, to use the words of the circus agent, “greater and grander than ever.” The Reuben editor takes the stuff and prints it good-naturedly, smilingly accepts the passes of the local manager, goes to see the show, says it is “good, by...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 12 August 1905

4 Tfie free-feance Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONE YEAR SI.T6 SIX MONTHS 90 THREE MONTHS 50 PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FCR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 422 E. flam Street DEATH OF C. P. SAPP. With deep regret we chronicle the passing of Mr. C. P. Sapp, the late talented editor of the Virginian-Pilot. The death of this comparatively young man puts a period to an intellectual life whose performances and promises were alike above the high average of his class. Mr. Sapp was born in the State of North Carolina, and was of Norman-French extraction, his ancestry originally coming from that noted section of the world bordering on the English channel, so prolific of men of genius and surpassing Intellect. Those who followed Mr. Sapp through the columns -of the Virginian-Pilot were impressed with the power, condensation and Incisiveness of his writings. In a high degree he possessed both the contemplative and creative mind, and while never descending below an unusual stand...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 12 August 1905

E le>y#^BI e> y#^B B J mS |h h pa ; ,i, j i, -"| H *• . Hk BB K; B^y#:-r ■• - ,* y o Ur*ter The drowning of W. H. Killough at Virginia Beach on Sunday emphsizes anew the need of some intelligence in the management of our various sea-side resorts. The conduct of these places about Norfolk appears to be wholly in the hands of land-lubbers and farmers, who have no idea of sea-side requirements. To permit bathing off an ocean beach without a single life saving device is the extreme of idiocy or niggardliness. Then again all pleasure of a sea bath is lost by rea son of the fact that a swimmer does not enjoy wallowing in the mud near the shore, and frequently exhausts his strength in attempting to reach deep water where he can properly enjoy himself. Unless the swimmer be an adept, the effort to get to deep water leaves him little strength for a pleasant swim when he gets there, and perhaps none whatever for his return, especially when the current is strong. This is ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 12 August 1905

6 SOME DAY. Some day in anguish one shall kneel Beside the other's quiet bed, And in that fearful moment feel The worth of life forever lied, For one shall sleep, And one shall weep In anguish all uncomforted. And one shall stand beside a bier, And grudge the other’s happier lot, And touch, with many a blinding tear, A pallid lip that answers not. Which shall it be Or thee—or me, To know all earth a desert spot? And one shall, from a new-made mound Go forth into the w r orld alone, Remembering e’er the muffled sound Of falling earth—which one—which one? O, God, I praise Thy secret ways That keep this grief a while unknown! —HOWARD FARMER. THE BOOK OF JOB. All here Is calm and measured; the face of the speaker is pale and still; he has no narrative to set before us; the stream of feeling runs at times very deep and full, but silently and noiselessly. A dreary sense of the miseries and worthlessness of human life broods around us as we read; haunts us, perhaps, as with his accents in ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 12 August 1905

A NEW NORFOLK ENTERPRISE. Letter written by a progressive citizen to a New York capitalist with the hope of adding to Norfolk’s many enterprises: My Dear Arthur: I am sorry that you do not seem as enthusiastic over the proposed “Soap Factory” as I believed you would be after the glowing letter I wrote you on the subject. You appear to think that I have been misinformed. Not at all! while I must admit there is some lye about soap making, it is in the man a slick and honest business, the best feature about it being that all defects and imperfections come out in the wash. Your ignorance of soap-making is neither here nor there, you can learn, and I still maintain that though young and frolicsome you may yet be wealthy, healthy and wise through the laudable entrprise of making, using and selling—soap. So I still urge you to saponify your bank account and come with me. Your objection to the business on sentimental grounds is one with which I have no patience, of course we all know that t...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 12 August 1905

8 THE TOILERS OF OUR LAND. The following poem by Mr. Walter Thomas Pope is published by special request of some of his friends and admirers in Portsmouth. I sing of the toilers of our soil, The yeomanry of the land, Who win by sweat and honest toil, Their bread with their brawny hands. No star of hope for them does shine To light their rugged way; Where’er they toil, they only find Long hours and little pay. They labor on from year to year, In the workshop, field and street; For the wife at home, and children dear, They struggle for bread and meat. Through winter’s cold, and summer’s heat, They bear their heavy load; With worn-out brain, and weary feet, They tramp rough labor’s road. With tired hands, and sweating brow, They toil on day by day; Beneath oppression’s yoke they bow, And humbly plod their way. The worm that crawls upon the ground Is happier far than he, Who by this galling chain is bound, And from toil is seldom free. With one day only in the w r eek, Their humble lot i...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 19 August 1905

Vol. I. No. 22 /WHSA col.*Hk'£V ( in THe coorv-rynewr or THt n(?M(ritTooT-Fvjs/otf6-ppm.o is s-pe/v A rewj Y^/VX^ REFLECT < r/€» *'Kovm iT -HA PPEf/tp." FI NU.&Y H f\% A fcooD /v\ft fs /\ Sor|\y /m'a- oaat’t r°° k A I—*— OF TH^ OFT«e_ T7/iAE ; LfTnE <Seoß(b|E 7 W/UH£& 200 /IS//JL4FS 7~a Norfolk, Va., August 19, 1905. Price Five Cents

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 19 August 1905

2 THE KNOCKER. (Being Article First of a series of natural history lessons written for The Free-Lance.) Heretofore a species of woodpecker, which is said to do some insignificant damage to fruit trees, enjoyed the distinction of being a “knocker,” Recently the term has been gathered in by the devotees of slang and made to serve the purposes of that vulgar though often forceful jargon. In the slang language it is applied in the derisive or reprobative sense to persons who are disposed to injure their neighbors by quiet insinuations or detractive conversation in the absence of the victim. While this might be covered by the ancient word slander, yet there is a subtle difference which does not come within the compass of that term, and it is just this difference that the appellative “knocking” comprehends. The dictionary defines a knocker as one who or that which knocks. Before the advent of the (now rapidly passing) pull bell, and the modern door gong and electric bell, the knocker used...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 19 August 1905

PORTSMOUTH ITEMS. NORFOLK COUNTY POLITICS. Regardless of the previous Lard rains and consequent heavy roads, there was a gathering last Friday night at Butt’s Road School House of one hundred and fifty staunch, true, and liberal Democrats, all qualified voters, and some fifty or more of (lie good dames and maidens who busied themselves in preparing a delicious supper for their husbands, brothers, sons and sweethearts. The old established reputation of Butt’s Roads for hospitality was more than sustained. The meeting was held In the interst of fail* and liberal government of Norfolk county, and was addressed by Messrs. Marshall, Parker, Bagby and others. .Contrasting this meeting with that held at Hickory Grove, on which occasion the pseudo-re-formers were met ou the ground by exactly four voters, and after a gloomy day returned to the city, it indicates clearly on which side the majority of respectable people will be found in the forthcoming contest. The enthusiasm which greeted eac...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 19 August 1905

4 Tfie Free-batice Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONE YEAR #1.75 SIX MONTHS yo THREE MONTHS 50 PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 422 E. Haiti Street A PROPER RULING. The democratic state central committee, sitting- at Richmond, hy a unanimous vote, the full committee of thirty being- present, decided that there shall be an election here for a new city committee on the 22d instant, the same day as tiie state primaries. This decision should settle the matter of-the date for the election. Tiie ruling- of the central committee is eminently proper, upholding as it does the opinion of State Chairman Ellyson, who lias all alongheld that the election for city committee should be held on the same day as the state primaries. Tiie decision from Richmond is a victory for the anti-administra-tion people, and is a just and merited rebuke to the purlflcatlonlsts, who sought to stave off the election for purely political reasons. The goo-goos know full wel...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 19 August 1905

The humid air of last Saturday night was suddenly rent in twain by the shrill blast of a policeman’s whistle. The alarm came from the corner of Reid’s lane and Main street, and was quickly followed by several more blasts in alarming succession. The crowd rushed to the spot and the writer followed the crowd, anticipating that his efforts would be rewarded with at least the sight of a couple of ghastly murders. The blasts of the whistle continued with alarming frequency until even the policeman at the California restaurant deserted his post and ran down the lane. Pretty soon the culprits appeared—three negro wenches aiid one rather insignificant buck. Five hundred people saw the gallant cops march the dangerous criminals off to the alarm box. So far as we could gather, the negro man had kicked one of the women in the abdomen. Our Norfolk police are past masters in the art of anti-climax. We believe a half-dozen real desperadoes could fight the whole force to a stand-still. It is alleg...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 19 August 1905

6 PLANT ME A TREE. Lay me to rest where the winds blow free, Out on the mountain or down by the sea; Under the beautiful dome of the sky With the flowers about, and the sweet birds nigh. Out where the manifold glories of spring Their secrets to Heaven are whispering; But whether on mountain, or down by the wave— Plant me a tree on my lonely grave. A wide-spreading elm, or a lordly oak, As a trysting-plaee for the feathered folk; W’here I may sleep as the lone years fly, To the music of nature’s lullaby. Whose roots may reach to my poor dumb clay And fashion it fair for the light of day; Through whose living green perchance it might gain A glimpse of tills beautiful world again. Plant me a tree; I may wake ’neath the dew And long for a glimpse of the world that I knew; For my dreams will be—ere my dreams be done— Of the warmth, and the light, of the well-loved sun. Or, waking not till the Judgment day— Yet do I know that this friendless clay Would thrill at the touch of the tree in i...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 19 August 1905

“DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES.” “I beg to report,” wrote Manager Hathaway, of the Norfolk Railway and Light Company, to President Williams, “that a wreck occurred on the road and Motorman Thomas was killed. His controller was wide open after the collision, and he was the cause of the wreck." We are not surprised that the manager of the octopus placed the blame on the man who was killed. “Dead men tell no tales,” and so far as the railway company is concerned the matter rests, the single track where the collision occurred is clear again and ready for another collision between cars with hand brakes. Are we to believe that Motorman Thomas, after he reached the View from the Willoughby Hotel, deliberately started his car back to meet the car he must have known was coming rapidly down the same track? We cannot conceive of a sane man doing this foolhardy act, and all of the evidence went to show that Thomas was perhaps the sanest man in the whole company. If we are correct, Motorman Chisholm, t...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 19 August 1905

8 jit tfte T^eaftm By Phill Space. We have received so many inquiries along the theatrical line that we give up this department this week to answer a few of our patrons. BOX OFFICE—The mellow-dramas presented at the Granby last season, as Abraham Lincoln would say were “very good shows for people that like those kind of shows.” SOUBRETTE—If you think you have talent why not consult the local managers. They seem to be the whole thing when it comes to opinions on actors and actorines. BALD-HEAD—We cannot as yet confirm the report that Lydia Pinkham is booked to appear this coming season in one of our local theatres in the thriller, “Where Did She Get That Flush on Her Face?” We also beg to state we have heard that Carrie Nation will also appear in Norfolk this winter in “Ten Bar-Rooms in One Night.” ANXIOUS —We shall endeavor to be fair to the theatre people this season. If we know a show bound here to be good we shall say so; if we learn from honest authority an attraction booked for...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x