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Elephind.com contains 48 items from Children's Friend, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 6 October 1877

VOL. XII. BBBMBw^yMg^ymjjyß^SS|Bß^BCnSS^^^^^^^^^Hj^H^|Mil.' ! I jjtyluy v mMBBI a j|^KHSMßyßM^SfiP[^^7{^P^H^^HHHH^Hß^^^^^H||J ]M MwHr riflffl^Hlj ■" "- j|i|u| ' • ■.>! »'-B'ft-^'-••• '1® HE little folks who now read the Children'x Friend from week to week, can have no recollection of the time when war raged through our country—that sad time when the fathers and brothers were far away in camp and field, while anxious mothers and sisters at. home sat sadly think- ing of the absent ones, and weeping over their danger. Not weeping and grieving only. They were nlways doing for the soldiers. Sometimes their busy hands prepared a box of needful garments; sometimes of dainties not to be found in army stores; sometimes, also, bundles of hospital supplies, rolls of linen bandages and packages of soft lint for wounded limbs and breasts. Mfiny n little girl, now become ft woman, can remember the hours given to such work, and even the busy thoughts that the while went chasing through ...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 6 October 1877

74 "Oh! that was Pilate, papa," said Harry; "when he let the people crucify Jesus." " Yes, but the stain of the sin was just as much on his soul after he had washed his hands as before ; and it is the same with our sins, whether we call them little or great; we cannot get rid of them, or of their consequences, however we try to clear ourselves. No washing of our own will do it. So what must we do, Harry ? "When you make your hands dirty with doing wrong things, how can they be made clean ?" I "God can wash them, papa; that is what you mean, isn't it ? because David said, ' Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.'" 4 "And Peter," added John, "asked the Lofd Jesus to wash not only his feet, but his hands and head ; but Jesus said he need only have his feet washed." " Yes, because, as the Lord said, he was washed already, by faith in Christ's cleansing word. It was the same cleansing that David meant when he prayed, ' Create in me a clean heart, O Goct.'- And I want my dear boys to p...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 6 October 1877

» /» • Ji J J OCTOBER G, 187 7. THE CHILDREN'S FRTENI) la published simultaneously at Richmond and New York semi-monthly, at fiO cents a year for single subscriptions, postage prepaid; or at 30 cents a year in packages of ten or more. sent, to one address. It will be beautifully illustrated, and handsomely printed on fine paper. It will contain the International Lessons as heretofore, so that the Sabbath Schools taking it will save the expense of Lesson Papers. The names of subscribers for the Children's Friend may be sent to J. 1). K. Slkigiit, Business Agent of the Presbyterian Committee of Publication, 1001 Main Street, Richmond, Va.; or to Richard Buinkiciuiokf, Business Agent of the Board of Publication of the Reformed Church in America, 34 Vesey Street, New York. P. S.—lt will prevent confusion in the settlement of the accounts between the two publishing houses for nil parties to send their subscriptions to the Business Agent of their own Church. THE EARNEST WORKER Is ;i semi-...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 6 October 1877

76 SERMON FROM A PAIR OF BOOTS. fHERE lived, forty years ago, in Berlin, a slioeinnker who had a habit of speaking harshly to all his neighbours who did not feel exactly as he did about religion, The old pastor of the parish in which the shoemaker lived heard of this, and felt tliat he must give him a lesson. He did it in this way : He sent for the shoemaker one morning, and when he came in said to him : " Master, take my measure for a pair of boots." "With pleasure, your reverence," answered tho slioomaker; "please take off your boot." The clergyman did so, and the shoemaker measured his foot from toe to heel, and over the instep, noted all down in his pocket-book, and prepared to leave the room. But as ho was putting up the measure the pastor said to him ; "Master, my son also requires a pair of boots. " I will make them with pleasure, your reverence. Can I take the young man's measure ?" "It is not necessary," said the pastor "the lad is fourteen, but, you can make my boots and h...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 20 October 1877

VOL. XII. ■ XH!" says Kittie, standing tip-too, j|rf "Oh! what grapes! And peaches too! "Wish I was a little taller! jx& Wish that I could reach a few! Wish I had a big red apple, And a juicy pear or two!" Take care, Kittie, standing tip-toe, Wishing, longing.—'twill not do. Soon the meddling little fingers "I can't do Without Him." —A few years ago I went some distance to see a dear Christian friend who was quite iIT with diptheria. After spending a few days with her, imparting what comfort I could, as I was about to take my leave, never expecting to see her again in this world, I said to her, " Jesus will be with you." Looking me in the face very earnestly, she replied, '* I can't do without Him." Jesus is of more importance to every son and daughter of Adam than all things else. We can do without health and friends and earthly comforts, but we can't do without RICHMOND, VA„ OCTOBER 20, 1877. TEMPTED KIT Ts, E. Will have grasped a pear or two, And some apples, grapes, ...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 20 October 1877

78 town I saw what I took to bo an umbrella walking down street 011 two very short legs, with fat red feet; and a very unsteady umbrella it seemed, staggering along like a drunken man ; but when I got near, I saw it was George Alexander with the baby on his shoulder and the basket on his arm, and the umbrella reeling over them. He was nearly exhausted; but he was very tender to the baby, for mother had gone shojipiug, and he must take care of it until she got through. But my story was to be about Muddy, and I will tell you about her now; but I thought you would, of course, like an introduction to her brothers and sisters. The Mahoneys live 011 the prairie, just where a high hill, called a mountain, slopes down to their very doors. We call it here "living 011 the edge of the timber," for though the fields are 011 the prairie, the pastures are in thick woods of blackjack, with heavy undergrowth, of hazel bushes. The house is a double log cabin, and the Irish potatoes are planted up to...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 20 October 1877

J •) OCTOBER 2 0, 187 7. THE CHILDREN'S FRIENI) Is published semi-monthly, at .10 cents a year for sinjrte subscriplious, postage prepaid ; or at 80 cents :t yenr in packages of ten or sent, to more one address. It will be beautifully illustrated, and handsomely printed on line paper. It will contain the Lessons as heretofore, so that the SaDbath Schools taking it will save the expense of Lesson Papers. The names of subscribers for the Children'# Frir.nd may be sent to J. D. K. Si.HKiiiT, Business Agent of the Presbyterhui Committee of Publication, 1001 Main Street, Richmond, Ya.; or to Richaku UitiNKKitnoKi', Business Agent of the Board of Publication of the Reformed Church in America, 34 Vesey Street, New York. P. S.~-It will prevent confusion in the sel tlement of the accounts between the two publishing houses for all parties to send their subscriptions to the Business Agent of their own Church. THE EAIiNEST WORKER Is monthly journal of thirty-two pages. octavo, published by the ...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 20 October 1877

80 THE LITTLE WORKER. 7 V NE day last summer, at tlie great Oen4r| tennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, I "ctv overheard a conversation that interlay ested me very much. The subject of it was a queer little animal called a gopher, which sat up in a case with its comical little head perched up in the air; for it wasn't even alive, but was a poor little stuffed gopher. In front I noticed two farmers, who were talking about my little friend in a very earnest way ; so I listened to their remarks. "Yes," said one, "I tell you he is a dreadful creature to dig. Why, he makes a sight of trouble out our way! can't keep anything that he can dig for away from him." "Is that so ?" said the other man. "Yes. Why, I pay my boys live cents for every one of 'em they catch; and it's lively work, getting 'em, I tell yon! See his nose, now ! doesn't that look sharp ? I tell you, when that fellow gets hold of a job, he keeps right at it! There is no giving up in him." "Dear me!" thought I, "how nice of l...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 3 November 1877

VOL. XII. -L& himself and li " Speck," i four legs, all J you cannot ri ~y that yo\i wer himself and little girls. "Speck," she says, "you are made with four legs, all of the same length; and since you cannot run on three of them, it is plain that yoii were not intended to roll hoops. Now, Belle and I have hands; I'm sorry for you. poor old fellow, that you have none; and as two feet apiece is all we need for running, we can guide our hoops where we wish. And now you understand that this is our game ; so you must stay here in the garden, while we go and play on PECK is a sensible dog. Rosa thinks he understands every ; word she says. And indeed he does seem to give a very intelligent assent to her remarks, though he says little himself. He sits iip before her with a countenance wise, wishful, appreciative, while she explains to him the difference betweeu RICHMOND, VA., NOVEMBER 8, 1877. [For the Children's Friend.] SPECK. the side-walk. Do you hear ?" Speck barks a littl...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 3 November 1877

82 [For the Children's Friend,] IDLE TO M. do vi TlJw we are s says notl OM, how cnn you be so lazy ?" "What is there for me to do?" asked idle Tom Then after a moment's silence he said to his mother who had spoken to him, "I don't think the Bible commands us to be working so hard, and yet you are all the time saying to me, ' Tom, go to work, Tom, don't be idle I should like to know why we are always to be industrious when the Bible says nothing about it]!" "You are mistaken, Tom," said his father, who just then came in, and heard what he said; " I want all of you Children to look over your Bibles, and after supper I will ask you to find for me the commandment which bids us be industrious." Father went off to the shop, and mother went into the next room to take up the baby, who was crying. Mary, the eldest girl, took down her Bible and began to turn over the pages. As it was easier to guess than to look for his Bible, Tom said he guessed it was '' the commandment which said, 'Thou s...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 3 November 1877

I A • J J «u NOVEMBER 3, 18 7 7. THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND Is published semi-monthly, at fiO cents a year for single subscriptions, postage prepaid ; or at 80 cents a year in packages of'ten or sent, to more, one address. It will be beautifully illustrated, and handsomely printed on fine paper. It will contain the Lessons as heretofore, so that the Sabbath Schools taking it will save the expense of Lesson Papers. The names of subscribers for the Children's Friend may be sent to J. D. K. Slicigiit, Business Agent of the Presbyterian Committee of Publication, 1001 Main Street, Richmond, Va.; or to Richard UitlNKiciMloPK, Business Agent of the Hoard of Publication of the Reformed Church in America, 34 Vesey Street, New York. P. S.—lt will prevent confusion In the settlement of the accounts between the two publishing houses for all parties to send their subscriptions to the Business Agent of their own Church. THE EARNEST WORKER • Is a monthly journal of thirty-two pages, octavo, published b...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 3 November 1877

84 A BRAVE GIRL. m — fTfIIHERE nre not so many brave girls in 3|T these days as there ought to be. We OX} have been watching, and this is the conclusion to .which we have come. Many of them are real cowards ; they are afraid to keep 011 the side of truth. They may not be afraid of the dark, nor of dogs and spiders ; but they are afraid to do what they know is right. There was Hattie Stone, a bright-eyed intelligent, sprightly, lovable creature, sitting by her mother, who was trimming her winter bonnet with gay ribbons and beautiful feathers, when Nellie Larkm, one of her playmates, called. "Is that your bonnet ?" inquired Nellie. "Yes," replied Hattie.' ' Isn't it pretty ?" "It'is very pretty indeed, I think," answered Nellie. " Mine is a poor-looking thing beside that." "Are you not going to have a new one ?'' "No. Mother says my old one must do this'winter with a little repairing; and I think it will myself." " Well, I should be afraid that the people would laugh at me when everyb...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 1 December 1877

VOL. XII. t iad be Beyon she li e beau For Mi lived comfort ERE is little Margie Ross. If | I you had seen her six months ago, you would hardly believe that this could be her picture now. Then she was pale and thin, a wee sickly thing, as she had been all her life —and lame. She had never been in the country. The entire eight years of her sojourn in this world had been spent in the close and dusty city. Beyond its brick walls and paved streets she had no acquaintance, not even . with the beautiful parks that lay in the suburbs. For Margie's parents were poor. They lived comfortably from day to day, but worked hard and had no money for luxuries. They could not even take time to go with her for a walk or drive, and with her poor helpless foot she could not go alone. RICHMOND,VADECEMBER 1, 1877. LAME M A II G I E. But a wonderful thing happened to Margie one day. A lady for whom her mother had done some sewing, and who had herself been once a cripple, heard about Margie, and came to se...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 1 December 1877

f 1)0 Under the martin-house, fifteen feet down, was a little window in the barn. Noboily intended to hit tliat; but, alas! an unlucky stone from Ned's hand went crashing through the glass. The boys stopped throwing. "Now you've done it!" said Tom. " We'd better make use of our legs and go." Ned thought it was cowardly, but allowed himself to be swept away by the rest. They reached the road. There they met William Transom ; he was Ned Freeman's father's " hired man." "Stop boys! Where are you going?" William asked. "William," replied Ned, "I am in trouble. I broke a glass just now." " Oh, shut up !" said Tom. " Don't tell everybody." " Why not tell ?" asked William. " Who's going to hide anything ? That's a sneak's part." Tom winced under the rebuke. Ned told William all about the trouble. ",What shall I do ?" he asked. "Ned,-there are two ways you may take to settle this thing up ; one is the way down the road, and the other is the way over the stone wall." . " What do you mean by ...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 1 December 1877

Children's J ripH. j j DECEMBER 1, 187 7. THE CHILDREN'S FRIENI) Is published semi-monthly, at SO cents a year for single subscriptions, postage prepaid ; or at 30 cents a year in packages of'ten or sent to more one address. It will be beautifully illustrated, and handsomely printed 011 fine paper. It will contain the Lessons as heretofore, so that the Sabbath Schools taking it will save the expense of Lesson Papers. The names of subscribers for the Children's Friend may be sent to J. I). K. Slkigiit, Business Agent of the Presbyterian Committee of Publication, 1001 Main Street, Richmond, Ya.; or to Rich Attn BkinkliimoFF, Business Agent of the Board of Publication of lie Reformed Church in America, 34 Vesey Street, New York. P. S.—lt will prevent confusion in the settlement of the accounts between the two publishing houses for all parties to send their subscriptions to the Business Agent of their own Church. THE EARNEST WORKER Is a monthly journal of thirty-two pages, octavo, publi...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 1 December 1877

92 LET'S PLAY. ifiKH, the blessed and wise little children, J Q What sensible things they say, When they can't have the things they wished for, They take others, and cry : " Let's play!" " Let's play" that the chairs are big coaches, And the sofa a railroad car, And that we are all taking journeys, And travelling ever so far. "Let's play" that this broken old china Is a dinner-set rare and fine, And our tin-cups filled with water, Are goblets of milk and wine ! "Let's play" every one of our dollies Is alive and can go to walk, And keep up long conversations With lis if we want to talk. "Let's play" we live in a palace, And that we are queens and kings ; "Let's play" we are birds on a tree-top, And can fly about on wings. "Let's play" tliat we are school-keepers, And that people may come to our school, And punish them all most soundly, If they break but a single rule. Oh, the blessed and wise little children, What sensible things they say! And we might be as happy as they are, If we ...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 15 December 1877

, N VOL. XII. t OTHER, what does this picture mean ?" said Willie, bending over his new Sun- " Tell me what is in it," answered his mother, too busy at that moment to look " O, lots of birdies up in a tree —only it don't look like a tree exactly. It's a big bunch of hay tied on the top laid aside her sewing and took k both on her lap. "O, this mas sheaf," said she. " The boys and girls in Norway have a beautiful custom of hanging out a sheaf of grain for the birds on Christmas morning. They tie it to the end of a pole, as you see in the picture, and fasten the pole to the roof of the house. There's another in the distance. See, Willie ! And the birdies seem to know when it is Christmas time. At all RICHMOND, YA„ DECEMBER 15, 1877 THE CHRISTMAS SHEAF. events, they come in flocks to the feast, sure of having plenty to eat one morning in the year. How glad it must make them, when all around everything else is covered with snow ! What a twittering and chattering there must be above ever...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 15 December 1877

relate, dropped it right under the wheel. Poor Angelina ! She shrieked now, regardless of consequences, " O Auntie Bell, my baby has tumbled down. Hers bloked hers head, I know,'' And such a wail of woe was never known to wake the echoes of old Beech Hill before. I cannot h • consternation, and surprise, and fright of poor Auntie Bell and her handsome Prince. But what did that dreadful man do, but burst into such a roar of laughter as he rescued Angelina, and fished Pink out of the back of the buggy, as made the old woods ring again. " 01), dear," said Auntie Bell, " you'd never laugh if you knew what ears that child has got." " I dessed myself all alone ; 'thout any buddy to help me ; I fought I'd s'prise you said Pink sweetly, cuddling np closely to Auntie's side. "But it was very naughty," said Auntie. "I don't know what I shall do about it." The tender-hearted young aunt could not bear the grieving lip, and said softly, "Dear, naughty, little child, we'll have to kiss and make u...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 15 December 1877

9 (• I* i «■ DECEMBER 15, 18 7 7. THE CHILDREN'S FRIENI) Is published semi-monthly, at ;">0 cents :i year for single subscriptions, postage prepaid ; or at HO cents a year in packages of/ten or sent to more one address. It will be beautifully illustrated, and handsomely printed on fine paper. It will contain the Lessons as heretofore, so that the Sabbath Schools taking it will save the expense of Lesson Papers. The names of subscribers for the Children's Friend may be sent to J. I). K. Slkioiit, Business Agent of the Presbyterian Committee of Publication, 1001 Main Street, Richmond, \ a.; or to Richard Brinkkiuiokf, Business Agent of the Board of Publication of the Reformed Church in America, 34 Vesey Street, New York. p. s. It will prevent contusion in the set tlement of the accounts between the two publishing houses for all parties to send their subscriptions to the Business Agent of their own Church. THE EARNEST WORKER Is a monthly journal of thirty-two pages, octavo, ...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Children's Friend — 15 December 1877

96 home, and do not preach to any one, and leave ns to do as we please." "I shall do neither of these things," replied Hal. "I shall certainly not try to steal fruit, nor will I go home to the village unless you all go too." Mark uttered a cry of rage, and aimed a blow at Hal's head. The boy nimbly jumped aside, and before Mark could aim again he was arrested by a shout of surprise and horror from some of his companions. In the noise of the dispute, the boys had not heard that a ladder had been moved on the other side of the wall, to the place opposite which they stood; and now a man's head and shoulders and a pair of strong arms appeared above, and the voice of the Squire's head gardener said, " So, you thought I had gone to tea, did you! A nice set you are ! I know you all. You, Mark lleed —and a precious coward you are to strike a boy smaller than yourself. And you, Moses Meeks; and you, you ruffian of a Tim; and the rest of you who stand by and see a fellow abused because he wou...

Publication Title: Children's Friend
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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