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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ADVANTAGES OF BLOODED FOWLS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

ADVANTAGES OF BLOODED FOWLS. It seems difficult to convince many persons that a ten dollar fowl may be more economical to breed from, than one that costs only one dollar ; yet nearly every one is ready to admit the advantages of blooded horned stock on a farm. Many farmers who can readily see that the same amount and quality of food will produce varying results in the return of milk, butter or beef, according to the breed of the animal fed, are slow to apply the same arguments to fowls ; and that, too, without any reference whatever to the less importance of the latter in the general economy of a farm. The matter of the selection of fowls is regarded quite too much as a mere individual fancy. It has required full half a century to force the conviction of the importance and value of blooded stock upon the minds of the farming community generally ; but from what has been accomplished during the last decade, we have reason to believe that an equal advance will be made in the quality of...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Cotton Culture in California.—No. 1. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Cotton Culture in California.—No. 1. JOHN L. STRONG [Written for the Pkksb.] It is difficult to define the precise limits "within which cotton may be succesafully produced in California. With reference to climate, the isothermal lines may be taken as safe latitudinal boundaries. Reference to a physical atlas will disclose the fact that nearly the entire state lies within the cotton zone. At latitude 86° the isothermal line of 60'—which is asstimed as the northern boundaiy of the "cotton belt" of the United States —curves northward. Following the western slope of the Sierra Nevadas, it extends beyond the 40th parallel at Fort Heath, and then curves downward again following the eastern slope of the Coast Range mountains until it reaches the Santa Barbara islands, where it again turns northward. Limiting the southern boundary of the "cotton belt" of the United States to the isothermal line of 70°, we descend, in California, to San Diego. The question of profitable production on the vas...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Agricultural Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

California Agricultural Notes. More Multioaulis Trees. —Dr. J. Strentzel, of the Alhainbra Farm, in Contra Costa county, is planting 2,000 mortis moretti mulberry trees and 1,5000 multicmdis cuttings. Mr. John Thorpe, of Placer county, is also planting 2,000 mulberry trees-^-one-half of the moretti variety, and the other half multicmdis. A number of the neighbors of Mr. T. are also planting a Jess number each. >OriUM Culture.—C. W. Keed, the well known orchardist and mirsery man of Yolo county, is preparing to enter into opium culture this coming season. Imported Pig.—Cary & Mitchell, of Colusa, have a little pig which they have just imported from St. Louis, two and a half feet from " tip to tip," which weight 144 pounds. / Coal Oil for "Scab." —Parties are using oil from the San Fernando oil springs, for the purpose of healing scab in sheep. It is said to be an excellent remedy. Wool Statistics. —The statistics of tfie San Fransisco wool trade show a receipt ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eastern Agricultural Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Eastern Agricultural Notes. Lakge Poultry Establishment. — A man in Lowell, (Mass.) has Imilt a poultry establishment capable of containing 3,000 hens. Singular Farm* Product.—lt is said that a farmer in Massachusetts made $2,000, last year, by selling burdock roots. It is said that pork will be lower this winter than for the past ten years, as the .Western markets will be over-stocked. Wheat in Illinois.—Winter wheat is looking well in Illinois. The quantity fcown this fall is much larger than heretofore. The prospect for the coming crop is the finest ever known in that section. Illinois is shipping milk direct to New York City—six car-loads a month—but it is condensed first. Cheese Maker's Convention. — Two thousand cheesemakers are expected to meet in convention in Utica, N. V., on the 10th of this month. There will undoubtedly be some valuable talk there. Several prominent dairymen will deliver especial addresses. Potatoes in Colorado. — Colorado seems to lead off in potatoes. A...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
BEET SUGAR—A SUGGESTION. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

BEET SUGAR—A SUGGESTION. The success of the Beet Sugar Factory in Alameda County is attracting the attention of capitalists and agriculturists in many parts of the state, and already there are companies forming in many localities for the purpose of purchasing land, planting beets and manufacturing sugar therefrom. We are glad to see this. It will be of great benefit to the state in many ways. We shall be glad to assist all such enterprises by disseminating reliable information concerning all departments of the business. We would mention a fact in this connection which shows a degree of wise prudence in the Alvarado Company, and which is at least suggestive to all other companies to be organized for similar purposes. Before purchasing their land and before expending much money anywhere, they sent a quantity of beets produced at or near their contemplated location to Illinois, where their present Superintendent was then engaged in a beet sugar factory, and had them manufactured. Thus ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Miscellaneous. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Miscellaneous.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Census of 1870. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

The Census of 1870. The increase in the population of the United States during the last ten years is less than has been commonly supposed. The increase in our Pacific states, more especially in California, during the last year, has also been less than was expected previously, although it cannot be complained of. \We publish the following comparative tables of population from the best sources at our command; and for reference they will be found particularly valuable. The figures have been carefully revised and corrected. CALIFORNIA. Counties. 1870. 1800. Inc. Dec. Alameda 24,218- 8,!»20 15,'2!)2 Vlpine 086 New Co. 086 Amador 9,000 10,933 1,881 Butte 11,315 12,107 792 Calaverai 8,8% i0,3(>2 7,400 Colusa 0,171 2,274 3,897 Contn Costa 8,408 5,328 3,140 Del Norto 2,113 1,992 121 Xl Dorado 10,320 20,502 10,236 Fresno 0,330 4,r»05 1,731 lluiiibiilclt 6,109 2,694 3,415 Tnyo 1,952 Hew Co 1,952 Ke'ru 2,335 New Co 2,335 Klamath..;. 1,078 1.R03 125 |,i,1(.. 2,873 New Co 2,873 Lamten ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Lake Tahoe. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Lake Tahoe. [Written fob the Phebb.] My wanderings having brought me to this beautiful spot, I have had an opportunity for resting a short time from my labors, and send you a few lines from this mountain lake. I left the rail-road at Truckee Station, at which point I arrived at 3.30 A. M., and thence came by stage to the lake. Truckee is a famous lumber station. Here is a large number of saw-mills, steadily cutting the logs into proper shapes and sizes, and in quantities sufficient to supply the railroad and many districts along its line. Here a large planing mill haa been in successful operation .luring the past year, and here a San Frftacisoo party is about erecting large smelting works, this position having been chosen in great part on account of the abundance of fuel and the existence of the very best of water privileges. From Truckee to Tahoe City, a distance of 15 miles, one has a delightful ride in the fine stages of Messrs. Burke and Campbell. The road leads through a pass i...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Lake Donner. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

Lake Donner. Quite different from Lake Tahoe, yet not less interesting, is Dormer Lake. Only 3% miles long and one mile wide, it still has a peculiar beauty of its own, which causes one to hesitate long before awarding it a second place. Formed by the side and terminal moraines of an old glacier, hemmed in by woods and mountains, with its own natural curiosities and its own historical tragedy, well stocked with fish, and with pleasant hotels, it will ever attract many visitors who seek for the beautiful. The tragedy which gave name to the lake has been widely told, yet may be new to some of your readers. About a quarter of a mile from the Grant House are still to be seen the indications of a cabin. Here a party of immigrants, from Illinois, wero imprisoned by the snow in 1846. They suffered terribly, but finally a portion succeeded in getting away. A man named Dormer, his wife and a German remained. Those who escaped brought back a rescuing party, who found Dormer and his wife dead ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A CARD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

A CARD. Having seen the prospectus of the Pacific Rural Pkess, and believing there is great need in our comparatively new agricultural^ districts of such a journal as therein proposed, the undersigned do not hesitate to state that from the standing reputation and success of its publishers, (Messrs. Dowcy A: Co., proprietors of the Scentific Pkess,) we believe the new journal will be worthy of universal trial by our agricult«ral «nd rural population, and that its publication will be fruitful of much usefulness to its subscribers and in forwarding the development of our natural wealth and prolific resources. CHAB. F. REED. President State Agricultural Society. DR. J. 8. CURTIS, Yolo Co. WM. H. PARKS, late Prest. Iforth'n Dist. Ag.Society. ROB'T BECK. Secy Cal. State Agricultural Society. C. T. WHEELER. Member MaU- Board of Agriculture. ROB'T HAMILTON, member St. Board of Agriculture. E MILLS, Membtr State Board of Agriculture. 1. N. HOAG, late Secy State Agricultural Society. O. 0. WH...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. After digging and delving for years on our coast, working with hand and with brain, we have at last succeeded in raising our first crop of purely agricultural produce, which we present to our readers in this initial number of the Rural Press. What we have provided, we will here sum up. The preparation of our land is the hrst .step in fanning. The Grand Island Irrigation Scheme is well described and illustrated, as one epoch of land cultivation, and the Use of Manures (a homely but important subject) is also treated of. Then we are ready for further steps. Shall we raise Cotton? The first of a series of articles on its cultivation, is here given. Do we intend paying attention to Silk Culture or Poppy Culture? All of these are treated of in articles which show the peculiar requirements of our coast, and which are to be continued. What we can do in the way of Cultivating Trees, is here shown. What our prospects are in the Manufacture of Beet Sugar, with a new and cheap...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
From our Sample Issue, Dec. 17, 1870. THE PACIFIC RURAL PRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

From our Sample Issue, Dec. 17, 1870. THE PACIFIC RURAL PRESS. In presenting to our readers the preliminary or sample number of the Pacific Rural Press, we do not claim that it is what it should be, by any means; but the efforts of the publishers in conducting and building up the Scientific Press, is sufficient guarantee that no efforts will be spared to elevate their new paper, as fast as circumstances will permit, to such a standard of excellence and usefulness as will make it woi-hiy and fit to represent the great and growing agricultural interest of the Pacific ('oast. All we ask is the prompt and hearty co-opera-tiou of our frieuds in extending to it wieh a support at* will warrant the necessary outlay to make the paper what it should be. Being already provided with an able corps of writers and workers in every department, a well equipped office, and a reputation for integrity and energy, which has been accorded by a generous public and which has proved of the highest pecuniary...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TAKING YOUR HOME PAPER, [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

TAKING YOUR HOME PAPER, If it is a good one, is not only a pleasant duty, but a profitable investment. We do not expect the people of this coast to patronize the Pkess alone because it is printed on the Pacific Slope, but if, all things considered, it is equally as good a paper for their purposes as any other, we certainly should have the preference, as a lunne journal, supporting home interests and developing home resources. We have the advantage of the situation, and we intend to produce a paper with which the agriculturists of the Pacific Coast will be satisfied, and of which they will be proud. The publisher! of this paper never failed of fulfilling their promise. Give ub a trial and see if we fail you now. Thanks to our cheerful co-worKers who encouraged us to start and have practically aided us in successfully commencing this new paper. We feel a friendly obligation for every kind word H2>oken and written. They inspire a desire to merit them truly.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
BEET SUGAR ITS PROSPECTS-A NEW PROCESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

BEET SUGAR ITS PROSPECTS-A NEW PROCESS. Industry is a great success in California. On the 17th day of November last, the Alvarado Sugarie made its lirst sugar. No difficulty OOOturreflj The machinery worked well, and every process was a success from the beginning. Better sugar we never saw. There are several methods* of making beet sugar. By the Alvarado method, the beets are washed and rasped, and the juice is extracted by a centrifugal screen. Defecation is effected by lime, and purification by carbonic acid gas, and by animal-char-coal. They use a vacuum pan for the final boiling; and, again, centrifugals for extracting the molasses from the crystalized sugar. The machinery for this method is complex and costly. The mill and all its appointments cost 8125,000. Its capacity is 50 tons of beets a day, producing four tons of sugar—which shows eight per cent, of sugar in the beets. The cost of production scarcely exceeds seven cents, and the average market price may be quoted at 12 c...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

CORRESPONDENTS. We are authorized to announce the fol- > lowing, among the well known writers ou this coast, who will write regularly or occasionally for the columns of the Pacific Rural Press: Prof. Ezra S. Carr, of the University of California; I. N..Hoag, Sac- ( rameuto; W. Wadsworth, Sacramento; T. M. Logan, M. D., Sacramento; ltev. O. 0. Wheeler, Sacramento; E. S. Holden, M. ])., Stockton; J. S. Harbison, Sacramento; S. H. Herring; Dr. Anderson, of Santa Cruz; besides several others—ladies and gentlemen —whom wo may be at liberty to announce hereafter. Our Am'EiuisEKS. —A-moro worthy list cannot be found in any journal. Much of the limited space allotted to advertising is already engaged. To CoBBHBPOySBXTS. —"Wo have a largo number of communications on hand marked for insertion —among which are favors from " W. W.," of Sacramento; "F. M. 5.," of San Diego; "A. B. 1i.," of Petaluma; "S. H. H.," who writes from San Mateo and Peseadero; and "E. P. H.,"San Francisco. We ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CHROMOS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

CHROMOS. The engraving which we print on this page is from the celebrated chromo-litho-graph of Hill's Yosemito, a scene which has been painted at by every artist who has ever visited this coast and become familiar with the subject, either by visiting the valley or by the aid of the numberless photographic views from .time to time brought out. But of all who have attempted the difficult task of reproducing in colors on canvas a general view of the valley (we believe this is conceded by every one conversant with art matters) no one has yet produced a picture of this beautiful scene which excels the one referred to. The best proof of this is the fact that the painting sold for a lanre price to a representative Californian, who is thoroughly conversant with the scene Mr. Hill essayed to portray. It is true that many good, anc some very fine, works of art have been produced, founded on the much-hackneyed Yosemite; bul; they were generally like the sto rifs "founded on fact," —a resembla...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HILL'S YOSEMITE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

HILL'S YOSEMITE. In regard to the engraving of this beauti* ful and renowned California valley,, which we present to our readers this week, a few words concerning the principal points indicated may be acceptable to those to whom the features of the place are not familiar. On the left hand, or north side, is El Capitan, or Tutucanula as the Indians call it, which rises up from the valley to a hlght of 3,<i00 feet. On the right hand are the cHffs on the face of which is «ce:i the Bridal Vail Fall, about 1,000 feet in liight. Behind this is a part of the Cathedral Rock which rises up 3,000 feet. Further back, about the center of the picture, is Sentinel Rock, with its obelisk, itself 1,000 feet high, rising up to over 3,000 feet above the level of the valley. Then comes the Half Dome, a crest of granite 4,737 feet high, and with the face toward Tenaya Creek absolutely vertical for 2,000 feet down from the summit; while in the background is seen North Dome, 3.568 feet in elev...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
EXTENSION OF BUSINESS — TWO PAPERS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

EXTENSION OF BUSINESS — TWO PAPERS. The rapidly increasing circulation of the Scientific Press, and the broad field which it had undertaken to fill, suggested, some months since, to the publishers of that paper the propriety of issuing two editions one for the mining and the other for the farming interests of the Pacific Coast. The success of that enterprise has been beyond our most sanguine anticipations; and now, at the urgent solicitations of" numerous friends and correspondents we have determined to give a still greater distinctiveness to our efforts in behalf of these two leading industries of this coast, by advancing the two editions to separate and independent journals. The Scientific Press will continue, as heretofore, to represent and encourage the Mining Interest, while our Agricultural Industry will bo represented and sustained by the Pacific Ruraij Pbess, the first regular number of which is to-day presented. The acknowledged advantages already derived acknoAvledged adva...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR HEAD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 7 January 1871

OUR HEAD. Having spent considerable time in preparing and embellishing our head (by which term, to avoid any possible misunderstanding, it may be well for us to say we mean that which stands at the top of the first page of the Pkess) , we may be permitted to call attention to its general ay>propriateness. As the labor of the mechanic is of the utmost importance to the farmer,, as the value of improved agricultural implements cannot be over-estimated, it will be perceived at once that it is eminently i>roper to place at the foundation of all things rural, designs to this effect; wherefore there are to be seen below, the hammer, the anvil, the saw and other mechanical tools on the left, and the plow, the harrow, the scythe, etc., the simpler forms of farming instruments, on the riant. Also, on the right, is seen a waving field of grain, falling before the improved harvester, whose excellent working is indicated by the smile on the farmer's face, not visible at pr...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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