ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, An... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 668 items from Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
668 results
The Youngest Reader is Somebody. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

The Youngest Reader is Somebody^ ONE kernel is felt in a hogshead: one drop of water helps to swell the ocean; a spark of fire helps to give light to the world. You are a little child; passing amid the crowd you are hardly noticed; but you have a drop, a spark 'within you, that mav be felt through eternity. Do you helieve it. Sat that drcp in motion give wings to that spark, and behold the re. suits ! It may renovate the world. None are too small, too feeble, too poor to be of service. Think of this, and act ! Life is no trifle. Up, then, little reader and prepare to live in earn est. Mind your book, mind your teacher, and mind your parents.

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRAY MUCH—PRAY WELL. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

PRAY MUCH-PRAY WELL. FELIX N"epp once made the following compa rison :-" When a pump is frequently used, but little piains are necessary to have water ; the water pours out at the first stroke, because it is high. But if the pump has not been used fbr a long time, the water gets low, and when you want it you must pump a long while, and the water comes only after great elforts. It is so with prayer : if we are instant in prayer, every little circumstance awakens the disposition to pray, and desires and words are always ready. But if we neglect prayer, it is difficult for us to pray, for the water in the well gets low."

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Royal Fxample. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

A Royal Fxample. Otjr total abstinence friends are not perhaps generally aware that Charles XII, " the mad King of Sweden," as he was called by some of his contempo* raries, was a pledged man, though not a member of a teetotal society. The anec dote on which this statement is founded is given in M. de Bury's " Essai Iiisto rique et Moral sur 1' Edn cation Fran caise." Charles, as everybody knows, in the commencement of his career, drank to great excess. In one of his drunken bouts he so far outstepped the limits of propriety as to treat the Queen> his mother, with great disrespect. The next day, being informed of his rudeness, he took a glass of wine in his hand and xe paired to the queen's room. " Madame," said he to her, " I have learned that yesterday, in my cups, I forgot myself towards you. I come to ask your par don ; and to prevent the recurrence of such a fault,'! drink this glass to your health; it shall be the last during my life." He kept his word, and from that day ne...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Biography. Written expressly for the "Band of Hope Review." [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

Biography, Written expressly fot the " Band of Hope Review" As enjp of the first incentives to the Emulation of youth, is the recording of ^he lives, trials, aftd adventures bf emi nent tnen, many of whom rose from the .greatest obscurity to astonish the world .with th«ir Woftderful discoveries, we shall fccdasionStlly present to our readers a few leading sketches of such as have handed down to us their researches in the vari ous branches of literature and science. Perhaps one Who ought to rank among "tfefe first, is Benjamin Franklin. He was a self-educated man, and his efforts to surmount tir* obstacks he had consequently tb contend witb> may well make many thoroughly ashamed of theif ignorance while living in a more mlight* ened age* He Was born at Boston, in North America, on January 17th, 1706. Dur<» ing the detraction of England in the. reign of Charles II., which raged among Papists and Nonconformists, his fathe* had emigrated to New England. At eight years of a...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Geography [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

Geography Is one of the first sciences that should engage the attention ef man. By it we learn the po sition of the various Countries, Kingdoms, Oceans, Seas, and Rivers, and the tributaries which abound throughout the world. The climate, the varied castes of its inhabitants) the natural productions, the governments, their relative position with us, and the effect they have on commerce, trade, agriculture^ and the general social well-being of the whole human race. JVIodern Geographers have added so much of late years to the previous know ledge of its first authors, that it is positively necessary for every one, who has a desire to keep up his store of instruction with the age we move in, that he has frequent access to the more recent publications on all matter, which has reference to the new and marvellous won ders, which nature is constantly developing in the wide field, which Geography embraces*. As nowever sucn worAs aie voluminous, and expensive, and frequently beyond the means ...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Ancient History. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

-- XJKJ 1 1 1 Ancient History. IT is necessary, to become a historian, that we should have some knowledge of Geogaaphy and Chronology. A study so useful and entertaining makes us inti mate with the rise and progress of nations -their arts and sciences, their trade and commerce. Many "which have been handed down to us only by tradition, are proved by those ancient and noble edi fices, which still exist in almost every country of the globe. This is particu-* larly the case iu Rome, Egypt, Greece, Abyssinia, Thebes, the oity of a hundred gates, where living monuments protest their origin from the earliest birth and history of the first generations of man. We should be apt to be doubtful of muqh that has been recorded to us of what passed in the darker ages, had we not these stupendous edifices, gorgeous pa laces, magnificent churches, and tow'ring pillars which still exist to greet the eye of every traveller, who for the love of curiosity, and in the search of knowledge from time to ti...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHO IS THE COWARD. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

WHO IS THE COWAim. I WAS sitting in the second story of the house with the window open, when I heard shout of children from beneath me. " Oh, yes, that's capital ! so we will ! come, oome on now ! there is William Hale ! come on, William ;-we are going to have a ride on the road, come with us ! " " Yes, if mother is willing. I will run and ask her," replied William. " Oh, oh ! so you must run and ask your ma ! Great baby, run along and ask your ma ! Are you not ashamed? 1 did'nt ask my mother," " nor/," " nor/." added half-a-dozen voices. " Be a man, William," cried the first voice, " come along with us if you do not want to be called a coward as long as you live. Don't you see were all waiting ! " I leaned forward to catch a view of the children, and saw William standing with one foot advanced, and his hand firmly clenched in the midst of the group ; he was a fine sub ject, for afpainter at that moment. His flushed brow, flashing eye, comprassed lip, an$ chang ing cheek, all told h...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REMEMBER. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

REMEMBER. A little boy was amusing himself with his playthings, upon the Sabbath. " Edward/' said his mother it is the Sab bath-day." " Oh. is it 1 said he; " I did not remember" " That is the very command which God has given us," said the mother: "Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy." Children often excuse themselves by saying, " I did n^t think," " I forgot," " I did not re member," but such excuses are not acceptable to God. We may plead ignorance as an excuse for the neglect of duty, but not forgetfulness.

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WAR. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

W A R. THE horrors of war have at length broken in upon the blessings of peace, which for more than forty years have existed between England and the nations of Europe. The Emperor of Russia, although possessing one of the largest empires in the world-grasp ing for still greater power, has been seeking to subdue the Turkish Empire to his sway. War between the Turks and Russians has been the result. Towns and Yill ages have been, burned up; men women and children have been slain; and thousands of soldiers have been left wrelt«ring in their blood on the battle field. How striking are the words of a great mili tary man ; " I have seen buried cities, desola ted fields, and impoverish familiea. I have heard the groans of the father when deprived of his son, the support of his age ; I have wit nessed the dispair of the mother, when be reaved of the delight of her eyes, and the joy of her life : I have heard the frantic cries of the widow, and have seen the tears of the orphan; I have behel...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Children's Party at Kiama. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

A Children s Party at Kiama. AN interesting entertainment was given by the Rev. G. Mackie, on Thursday, ] 3th Decem ber, 1855, to the children of this place. As all the boys and girls in and around Kiama having an invitation to the party, it 13 not in the least marvellous that the Free Church should have been barely capacious enough to accommodate with seats the numbers that assembled. The juveniles were honored with the presence of several of the gentry of the district, and with that of Mr. G. Bowman, M.L C., and the Rev. Messrs. Salmon, Lums daine, and M'Kail, who all appeared solicitous for the well-being of the rising generation. The children were addressed by the Rev. Messrs. Mackie and Lumsdaine, to whom they listened with marked attention ; and between the addresses they were plentifully supplied with sweet cake and tea, of which all appeared to partake with a healthxul relish. -lllawarra M ercury.

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PITT-STREET BAND OF HOPE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

PITT-STREET BAND OF HOPE. J.HE ioilowing nas Deen iurmsnea oy the Secretary, and we cheerfully give it a place in our columns: Giving the following sketch of this society the object is mainly to afford some little infor mation to those who are desirous of promoting the cause in a similar way. The committee felt the want of such information at the com mencement, and although there were found kind friends willing to supply all that was required, still, it occupied much 'time and no small degree of trouble to collect. But it is not designed to offerthisasamodel institution, knowing that many who read this outline will detect faults and see much that might be improved. At the commencement about half-a-dozen oi the Sat bath School Teachers met, formed themselves into a com mittee, and passed resolutions to the follow ing effect : " That a Society shall be formed and entitled the Pitt Street Band of Hope. That the ob ject of this society shall be mainly the promo tion of the principles of...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A RAILWAY STATION. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

A RAILWAY STATION. A RAILWAY STATION presents an aspect which constantly varies. At one hour you shall find it a cool promenade, where the footfall of the porter or the policeman reverberates from the lofty walls and the glazed roof broken now and then by the thundering echoes of a heavy hammer-stroke, or the crash of a ponderously loaded truek shunted suddenly into its place. The pleasant,sunlight shimmers softly through the arched roof, and at tiie open endi towards the country you see the glittering rails wind ing onwards for miles, and converging to a point in the far perspective. As you stand gazing, a bell rings sonorously, at your elbow, and, if your eyes are as sharp as those of the ringer, you will discern in the distance a dim speck, or a fitful wreath of silver stream, w hich grows rapidly bigger and bigger as you look upon it, and soon bursting upon the ear with its sharp iteration of the piston stroke, gives indication of its near approach, Another mi uute and the huge ...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Disobedient Son. A DARK SHADOW UPON MEMORY. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

The Disobedient Son. A DARK SHADOW UPON MEMORY. MY father, after an absence of some years, returned to the house so dear to him. He had made his last voyage, and rejoiced to have reached a haven of rest from the perils of the sea. During his ahsence I had grown from a child and baby of my mother's (for I was her youngesfc), into a rough, careless boy. Her gentle voice no longer restrained me. I was often wilful, and sometimes disobedient. I thought it indicated manly superiority to be independent of a woman's influence. My father's return was a fortunate circumstance for me. He soon perceived the spirit of insubordination stirring within me. I saw by his manner that it displeased him, although for a few days he said nothing to me about it. It was an afternoon in October, bright and golden, that my father told me to get my hat and take a walk with him. We turned down an open field,-a fa vourite play-ground for the children in the neighbourhood. After talking dheerfully on different t...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BAD BOY MADE GOOD. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

o THE BAD BOY MADE GOOD. BOYS, I have something to say to you very important. A very kind father, who had "been to chapel one day, coming home in the evening, took his little boy, and placing him on his knee, inquired of him if he had been a good boy during the sabbath ? With a sad look, he said he had not. He had not been doing good, and he had grieved his mother. After suitable admonitions, he left the room, and the mother explained the case. She had occasion to reprove him during the day for indulging in trifling conduct. Instead of submitting meekly to the reproof, as was usual with him he became angry and mani fested a spirit of stubbornness. " My son," said the mother, " I must pray with you." They retired; aiid she prayed with him until his stubborn heart relented, and he was melted into sorrow for what lie had done. They returned but his little heart was troubled. After sitting awhile by her side, he looked up into her face, &nd said, with the most touch ing tenderne...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EGYPTIAN LIGHTHOUSE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 5 January 1856

EGYPTIAN LIGHTHOUSE. Have you ever read, dear children, about the beautiful lighthouse built of white marble, that stood many centuries ago at Pharos, in Egypt ? It was erected at great expense, and on the summit of the town, which was several hundred feet above the ground, was a great fire   kept burning every night. So as the sailors passed over the Mediterranean sea, and came near the city of Alexandria, they saw far away in the distance the beacon-light, by which to steer their course. Now, the Bible is the same to you as the light-house is to the sailor. It is "a lamp unto your feet, a light unto your path." How earnestly does the pilot gaze to catch a glimpse, if possible, of the bright beacon-light that shall guide him safely over the dark sea. So should you make the Holy Bible your guiding-star, giving heed "as to a light that shineth in a dark place."

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ZAPHNATH-PAANEAH. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 19 January 1856

[ ZAPKNA.TH-P A.ANEAH. ". I was bestowed upon a youth, Most lovely td behold ; Rous and holy-he was both ; Yet him his brother's sold. A slave in Egypt's slavish land, .(A double slave was he ;) Yet, God remembtred Joseph, and Raised him from slavery. Two dreams, which none could tell T God told young Joseph what they méânt, Which pleased Pharoah well. He gave this good young man my name Raised him in office high ; ¿ Clothed him with all he ranks éf fattie, And power, and dignity. " Of secrets a revealer," is My meaning you must know ; But humble Joseph thought, that this' God only could bestow. Hence; if you search> God's book «J1 o'er But once you'll find the word . And that, from one who did adore Idols, and not the Lord. Monarch, dreamt Newtown, Jan. 12th, 1855. ' JiT. Zeal in the cause of good is right, And if we each with all' our might, Persuade the youthful mind to see, Haw sad the Drunkarl's staie must be, No peaceful home, no hour for prayer.. Alas! Drink leads but to d...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SONG FOR THE MEMBERS OF THE VARIOUS BANDS OF HOPE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 19 January 1856

A SONG FOR TBE MEMBERS OP THE VARIOUS B¿.NP3 OF HOPE. ??: ' JPuíe sparkling water is our drink, With this we are content; For that is best we always think, Which God forman has seat; Then water, pure water for ever, We'll never be drunkards, no, never. No-drunkard's grave will we e're fill, No drunkard's bottle clutch ; ¡ But let us all drink water still, And in God put our trust, Then, &c., Let them sing of their fine red wine. Their brandy, rum, and gin, But they'll find to there cost some time, There in the paths of sin. * Then, &c. Hurrah for the fine cooling stream, ' , And sparkling mountains spring ; For rosy health is in the train Which Temperance will ming. Then, &c. *.«?.?

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PITT STREET BAND OF HOPE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 19 January 1856

PJTT STREET BAND OF ITO PE. .'?A.'" lecture was delivered on the pro Arties of alcohol by Mr. G. J. Crouch, on Wednesday 9th January,--and last * 'Wednesday some stories, were related on intemperance and some melodies ? sung. Next Wednesday January 23rd, Mrs. Dexter will deliver a lecture to the youthful members of the Jiand of Hope, and on the following Wednesday a Tem perance meeting will be held.

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EDUCATION. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 19 January 1856

£9fÍ»ÍB¡&t3: HE time which passes j-v Ä over our heads im percep ts l u <S> tibly, makes the same « J É gradual change in our P?«i»«i»?v manners, habits, and ac - WwWwIw tions, as it does in our altered personal appearance. At about the revolution of every seven years, we find ourselves another and yet the same being; we undergo a change in our views, and no lesa of the light in which we regard them, a change of motives too, as well as of actions. Circumstances considerably altered by a variety of causes, some per haps under our control, and others quite beyond it, so operate on our worldly po sit'on, that we are as it were, new crea tures, with other wants and requisites by which to support our more artificial state -our general well-being. Inillustration of this argument, we ha-ve only to call our readers attention to the former condition cf this country, when her pioneers felt that her g«eatest neces sity was manual labour. The man blest with the most bodily...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANCIENT HISTORY. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Band of Hope Review, and Children's Friend — 19 January 1856

ANCIENT HISTORY IM _ -in . ..t^« THE .Egyptians are among1 the first racés of mankind, whose history arid cóntjufests in arms--and whose governments are handed down to us fVóm the remotest times. ? . ' ? ? Egyjlt was the hirth pl-aoe of Hiero^ glyphics-which are curious characters and figures, used as a substitute for writing to represent battles, engagemeti ti, and other extraordinary events, Carved on lofty pillars of marble ànà* stone; and which, with the aid of well preserved tradition have afforded us the political revolutions and historical changes of darker ages. Numerous ancient ruins on the banks of the Nile still stand, and show by their grotesque characters and designs, the horrid carnage and warfare carried on by barbarous and blood-thirsty warriors, as far back as more than three thousand years from the present time. The Pyramids of Egypt with their huge masses of stone-about thirty of which still exist, are the natural wonder of every traveller. Indeed, the mind is los...

Publication Title: Australian Band Of Hope Review, And Children's Friend, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x