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Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Ban... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,195 items from Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
10,195 results
MELBOURNE LETTER [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

(From our .Speoial Correspondent.) A section of tho metropolitan press has taken upon itself to ])oint out tiio. faults -a»d faiimgs' of tixo police rorce. iiXo niueh-enUuriug constable is accused of all sorts of delinquencies —oilier among them being, apparently, a lack of tiie Chesteriieldian manner in moving on the gnixulous folk that block the sidewalks in the principal thoroughfares and the sensitive young tilings why inaku "under the clocks" their place of assignation—or perhaps we had better call it their rendezvous. Ine 'cop is perhaps no better than ne should bt espcc.ally the younger brigade of him—but that is probably more the fault of the system tfhau anything else. T)iis most important branch of the public service should be the n.oat attractive, but it is not. The pay, compared with the ruling rates of remuneration nowadays, is paltry, and the work is onerous and often dangei ous. Instead of decrying the police, and thus encouraging the un deniable element to make tiiei...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. WHY GIRLS LEAVE THE FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

THE FARM. v WHY GIRLS LEAVE THE FARM. | So much has been said about why ! boys leave the farm, but how about ' the girls ? What right has a girl on the farm ? In many eases, none at all, you might say. If she wants to go to a party or dance she must ask; father or mother ; and what will they say ? No ! And how do you think she feels if she hears of other girls going, and after they get back she hears them talk of the good times they had. I think after a girl gets to be eighteen or nineteen her parents should allow her to go out with her girl and boy friends to parties or wherever there is a social gathering. Of course, in some towns there are boys, and girls as well," that parents would not want their girls to keep company with, but this isn't always the case. And how are the girls treated about the farm work ? They must do all the house work, all the scrubbing, baking, washing,' ironing, and work in the garden, besides milk ing the cows, hauling hay, cleaning the cow barns, hauling...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW INSECTS ACQUIRE CASTE. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

HOW INSECTS ACQUIRE CASTE. . The various castes of social insocts liave different appearances, but it lias been supposed that tliey are alike uu .leaving the egg and develop their.pecu liar ' characteristics artificially" through dili'erences in feeding or the action of parasites. Seeking to learn when the different forms of termites, or white ants, begin, Professor Bugnion, of Paris, concludes that this theory is wrong. Among the several castes of this insect, the soldiers are wingless and have very strong mandibles, and the workers, which build and bring food, have a distinct form, but neither reproduce. The caste known as reproducers, on the other hand, with a special development, appear to perforin no part except per petuating the species. The investiga tion made with a number of. species shows that tho T)eculiarity of form ex ists in newly-hatched insects, and that, therefore, division into castes, like that of the sexes, takes place before tho lavae are born. On railway constr...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SALTING COWS. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

SALTING COWS. ! Cows that are good producers us< approximately three ounces of sail j per day ; and that dairy cattle should have salt is one of the verj , important questions many of us dc not understand, and therefore neg lect, writes a Canadian dairy farm [ er. All animals which consume large j quantities of vegetable matter require salt. Salt is required to expel the excess of potash from the animals body which is taken in with the vegetable food. Cows which do not get suffi cient salt gradually change to a con dition of low vitality indicated by rough coat, which results in a final breakdown. If salt is supplied when in this condition, recovery is pos sible. ^ There is no question that salt is absolutely essential to the preserva tion of the health of milk-producing herds, while the expense of salting cows is so trifling that it cannot be used as an excuse for not attending to such a weighty consideration. In Italy marriage brokers are a regular institution. They hav...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORLD'S LONGEST BRIDGE. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

WORLD'S LONGEST BRIDGE. It seems -probable that next year a commencement will be made with the ! construction of the railway bridge be tween Rugen and the mainland which will be longest in the world, exceeding even that over the Holiangho, with its 3580 yards. The- cost of this great engineering work is not expected to amount to more than £1,000,000, or less than a third of that of the Forth Bridge. When the bridge, which, it is said, is to include a track for pedestrians, though none for road traffic, is completed, it will substan tially shorten the journeys? between Berlin and Hamburg on the one hand and Stockholm and Ohristiania on ther other,.

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Man God Laughed at. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

The Man God Laughed at. (By GRANVILLE EORTESCUE.) ..''What the Orphan deg would do to iiiat blue-ribbon buil would, leave no work for the doctors. Turee cards, please, Mr. Dealer." The noise of water lapping the bow of the United States transport Grant was the only answer to Pr.vate Kelly's dictum. In the shade of the galley house six men squatted around an old grey army blanket, -playing poker-. The question of the better hand was de cided before Corporal Levitty squadron 'jlerk, spoke in defence of h's- comman der's througlibred bulldog. "Like hell he would." • The tone was mild despite the forceful exple tive. "Why,.the major's pup would eat that mongrel'up—eat 'im up." "Oh, I don't know;.I don't know about that." Kelly spoke with cri tical . inflection. "I would just as soon'"bet a couple of months' pay^ ou the Orphan—if we could pull the fight off. But the_ sergeant seems to be just as funny as the major about get ting, his canine's fur mussed up in a little set-to. Bulldogs ha...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A UNIQUE ENGINEERING FEAT. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

A UNIQUE ENGINEERING FEAT. A most interesting engineering feat is at present being attempted in Switz erland. at i'ully-en Vaiaia, where a liy ■ draulic-electric installation is to be driven by the pressure of water from Lake Fully, situated over 1800 feet above the Rhone plain, where the power station will be situated. The peculiar feature of the enterprise is the great height of the supply. The attempt has never before been made to utilise the fall of 1800 feet, and in technical cir cles it has been hitherto regarded as impossible. But a Lausanne engineer, M. Boucher, has undertaken the work with every confidence of success. The pressure is so great that it is impossible to allow a direct ilow, according' to La Technique Moderne, which gives par ticulars of the enterprise. The water will How to the valley by way of a con duit nearly three miles in length. The pipes will be from two feet to two feet six inches in diameter, and the thickness of the walls will be from a quarter of an...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEWS SUMMARY. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

&SEWS SUMMARY. A "shopkeeper at Croydon (England), has been lined £30, with- the alternati ve of imprisonment for three months, lor having sold margarine as.b.utter. He had' been fined on several previous oc casions. Another shopkeeper was fined for a similar offence. Mr. M. P. Cordia, assistant man ager of the Royal Dutch Packet Com pany at Sydney, was a passenger by the s s. Houtman, which arrived from Java. He said that trade between Java and Australia was increasing, Ike Australian trade wa. booming, especi ally in Singapore and the Malay States; The inquiry 'regarding the deaths ot fclio miners John iiirby and. 1 nomas J • Ileid, who wore-killed in the Tasmania mine on January, 2, has been, conclud ed. The jury returned a verdict that the men had met their deaths through a fall of rockand that no.blame was attachable to any person. The W. A. gold yield for Deeembei was 112,120 oz., of the value of £476,255. In November the yield was 117,912 oz., and in December, 1912 it...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMEN'S INTERESTS [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

WOMEN'S INTERESTS (By "Ambrosine.") Velvet neck-bands and satinfl ounces are two of the crazes of the moment. A narrow black velvet ribbon with a pendant, or a large baroque pearl is much worn with white blouses for morning wear. Some people have even adopted the fashion of wearing the flat wrist watch mounted on a black vel vet ribbon-bracelet, and this eighteenth ientury fashion makes a quaint con trast with a tailor-made dress. There is a new garment coming into vogue, which is partly scarf and partly pele. rine. A pretty one was in wide mate rial, the border of which consisted of a blanket stitch in thick Berlin woolj worked first in black, and then over that in white. The effect at a distance was not unlike ermine. Not for many a year lias lace played so interesting a part in the modes as it has this soason. The cfl'ort to widen the silhouette at least a little, has had something to do with the matter; for flounces have been brought from the imbo of discarded things, and what f...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XVIII. RICHARD HAMMOND'S LAST RESOLVE. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

CHAPTER XVIII. RICHARD HAMMOND'S LAST RE . SOLVE. Wo should not Hurry to realise a bloody sentence; A word may be recalled, a life oan' never he. —Schiller. Mary Hammond was suddenly throw upon the mercy of a. selfish world j the gaunt spectre of starvation stood be fore-her threshold; a sick child was crying in he? arms for food denied. Iso tidings had reaohed her from her hus band since his cruel desertion a de sertion she attributed to the cruel in fluence of his evil associate, - whose machinations-he had ever been unabLe to understand.. So day by day, she returned home, wearied and exhausted by a rutile search for labor ; day, by day she read, upon the thin pale faoe of her stricken child, a fever, hurrying on for want or -nourishment to fight it off. In response to many applications slie had made for employment, but one had consented to engage her to work about the house, and to this lady she was indebted for a day's food and two shillings weekly ; other employment be ing prac...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PART 6. CHAPTER VIII.—(Continued.) [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

PART 6. CHAPTER VIII.—(Continued.) "But I must hurry my plans," said Sir Peter. "I h&ve said nothing of marriage to him as yet." "Time enough—time enough. Don't worry. You spoke of some one you had selected for him. I asked no questions, but I guessed. I fancy it was' your niece Edwina." "The very one," replied Sir Peter. "Edwina will have a snug, fortune of her own. My brother is worth a lot of monej, and from me Well, I would do the right thing." "A good nest-egg, eh ? Gad ! Good enough for a prince. He will bite at it, without doubt. And a good thing for Edwina too. As Gerald's wife, and possibly as" "That's the main thing," said Sir iPeter. "Lord Chester seems in noA way inclined to marry. It is quite I possible that this youngster may be j the Duke of Chiltern. I am not so j blind as not to see- the advantage of having my niece a duchess." "No, no ; I should say not," said the colonel. "Has he met? Edwina?" j "No. Thomas sticks to Cracking- j stone Hall the year round. ...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FLAVOR OF BUTTER INJURED BY METALS. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

THE FLAVOR OF BUTTER IN JURED BY METALS. The United-states Dairy Division lias ; been investigating tiie effect of tiie f presence of a small amount of iron or copper may have on the iiavor of but ter. They report that very small amounts of these metals in the cream cause certain undesirable flavors to increase in intensity during storage. These flavors are often designated as ''met allic," "oily," or "fisliy." Experi ments were carried out,' using known quantities of varying from 1 to 500 parts to a million parts of cream. The butter was stored and examined at in tervals varying from 20 to 187 days. The most noticeable feature was the rapid development of bad flavors in butter containing the iron. . Butter made from cream -w-hiclr hffd*" stood in rusty cans developed a peculiar taste easily-kicked out. - - Tire-"influence of copper was even more marked than thatrof iron. The work shows that if cream is kept in rusty cans, or comes in con tact with iron or copper during the process ...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. A BAFFLED IMPOSTOR, OR, THE HEIR TO A DUKEDOM: A HUGE PERSONATION FRAUD. SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS PARTS. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. OR,— THE HEIR TO A DUKEDOM : A HUGE PERSONATION FRAUD. ^ ; By S. W. Hopkins, Author of "On Four Brass Plates," etc., etc. SYNOPSIS OF PREVIOUS PARTS. Henrj Barnes, an adventurer, finds himself sharing a room in a New York lodging.-house with a young fel low about his own age and physique. In the early hours of the morning, Barnes is horrified to discover that his companion is dead. On searching ' the deceased Barnes brings to light a sum of money and a letter, the lat ter being written apparently by the young man's father, George Lover ing, to his friend Sir Peter Steede, banker, of London, in which he im plores Sir Peter to do all in his power to help his son Gerald, with whom he has quarrelled, owing to the boy's attachment to a variety hall singer, named Mildred Moore. The letter further states that Gerald is sailing for London and intends' calling on the banker when he ar rives in that city. Barnes considers it a safe undertaking to impersonate the young man...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OF RURAL INTEREST [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

(By "Rusticus.") Much is being made of the discov ery by the Country Roads Board that veritable Land of Promise exists in the Heytesbury and Otway Forest districts. That is, however, an old story for anyone who has even a casual knowledge of the undeveloped resour ces of Victoria—undeveloped for the most part because of the lack of facili ties which it is the province of the Country iloads Board to provide. And it is not for want of effort on the part of the people who have been for more than a generation struggling to bring these rich productive areas into their oA'u, that, the need for railways and roads have not been recognised by 'the authorities. Efforts, little'short of desperate have, been put forth by (the settlers to have the justice of their Claims for assistance recognised. But the evil of centralisation—the "pull" of the people in the big centres—has rendered these efforts null. The Board, during a recent pilgrimage through Heyttcaury and Otway For ests, found that want ...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CEMENT IN THE DAIRY. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

CEMENT IN THE DAIRY. In our visits among the dairy farms, the creameries and the cheese j factories it is gratifying to note the ■ increasing > tendencj to use cement and concrete construction. It does | not only show that those who em ploy this class of construction; i have an . eye to durability, efficiency and economy, but it indicates a perman ency attached to the business that was less prevalent not many years ago. Then a dairyman built a shack for a barn, with dirt floors, and no provision for drainage. His dairy house was a flimsy shed. He figured ■ that this kind of construction, un sanitary, cheap and flimsy as it was, would last him a few years, by which time he hoped to be fortunate enough to be out of the business. Have you ever noticed that it is the class of people who think like this that have to stay in it the longest whether they choose to or not ? The dairyman with the right idea of economy, and who wants satisfac tion and good service, goes in for cement constr...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER IX. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

CHAPTER IX. If ever a mail fell suddenly into a boundless sea-of smiling favour, that man was Barnes. Edwina had been reared with a most worshipfnl regard for the exalted state of the nobly born. It had been part of her educa tion tliat an English maiden's duty— not' so much to herself as to her family—was to marry well. Added to the opinion thus fostered by educa tion was a natural ambition, which, so far, had seemed utterly beyond the possibility of fulfilment. And now, apparently from the skies a scion of one of the noblest houses of England falls into her very lap. Edwina would not have been the daughter of Thomas Steede, brother of Sir Peter Steede, Bart., had she not been fully alive to the advan tages of the present situation. In three hours after the introduction of Barnes as Gerald Lovering, Edwina had almost forgotten Vane Prance. She had entirely forgotten the symp toms of budding love that had stir red her bosom at the interview by the rock. With Gerald Lovering as a pos...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN ANCIENT DWARF. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

AN ANCIENT DWARF. A man named Rice, 30in. tall, who j was born at the Old Tower, Black-! friars Road, Yarmouth, over ninety years ago, and claimed to he .the oldest living dwarf in the country, is now in receipt, together with his wife, of an old-age pension. He be gan his career as a boy shoeblack on Yarmouth sands, and was often car ried home iu his mother's apron.

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRAYERS OF THE HORSE TO HIS MASTER. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 15 January 1914

PRAYERS OF THE HORSE TO HIS MASTER. j To Then, My Master, I offer my ! prayer : Feed me, water me," and care j for me, when the day's work is done | provide me with shelter, a clean, dry bed, and a stall wide enough for me to lie down in comfort. Always be kind to me. Talk to me. Your voice often means as much to me as the reins. Pet me sometimes, that I may serve you the more glad ly and learn to love you. Do not ;erk the reins, and do not whip me when going up hill. Never strike, beat or kick me when I do not understand what you want, but give me a chance to understand you. Watch me, and if I fail to do your bidding, see if something is not wrong with my har ness or feet. j Do not check me so that I cannot j have the free use of my head. If you i insist that I wear blinkers so that I j cannot see behind me as it was in- ; tended I should, I pray you be care- j ful that the blinkers stand well out ' from my eyes. ! Do not overload me, or hitch me j where water will drip on me. Keep...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CONGEALED MILK. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 22 January 1914

I CONGEALED MILK. Milk frozen into cubes weighing 2fi or 30 pounds apiece is a new idea adopted in the Brazilian province of Minas, Geraes, from which section Rio de Janeiro draws most of its milk supply, says "The Toronto," Ont,, Telegram. The milk is sterilised first and then is frozen into blocks. A number of these cubes are placed in cans having insulated walls hold ing about 300 quarts. The caps are then hermetically sealed and are cool ed.' to 39 degrees Fab. It is said that milk shipped after this treatment will stand a journey of from fifteen to twenty days without injurious effect, and that the melted milki blocks taste just like fresli milk. -"The Milk Reporter,"

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DAIRY. A MAN WHO DOES THINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Rupanyup Spectator and Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon and Lallat Advertiser — 22 January 1914

THE DAIRY. _ A MAN WHO DOES THINGS.. A year ago at a farmers institute in Highland county, Ohio, a mjtn got on the platform and read a paper on ensilage that could be written only by one who knows. A man seated be side me said : "That's Jake^ White, a bachelor, but he's onto his job." Af ter a year I am again in Highland county in the neighbourhood of Jake White. I have been in Highland county but five minutes when a good citizen said "You~~must see White's great dairy before you leave," and another said "White has the finest herd of 150 Jerseys I ever saw." "You can walk all through his stables with I bedroom slippers on and come out clean," said another. When a milk j waggon passes some one says, "That is White's." Two hours before dark one bright evening I walked out of Greenfield one mile to this great milk estab lishment. A daj labourer in a stone quarry milking two native cows and carrying the milk to customers aioot was the lot of Jake White 25 years ago. He says, "My worldly...

Publication Title: Rupanyup Spectator And Lubeck, Banyena, Rich Avon And Lallat Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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