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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FRANCE AND GERMANY. WHY THEY ARE QUITS. SOME ASTONISHING FACTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

FRANCE AND GERMANY.     WHY THEY ARE QUITS. SOME ASTONISHING FACTS. Field Marshal Count Von Waldersee has been summing up the result of 700 years of fighting between France and Germany. "The figures prove to my mind not only the   folly of war in general," says Von Waldersee, "but likewise that French and Germans are quits." Here is the grand total of victories and de-   feats with the number of men killed and wounded on the battlefield, for both countries:— Frenchmen killed and wounded by Germans 1,100,520   Germans killed and wounded by     Frenchmen 1,057,780     Number of French victories over Ger- mans 235 Number of German victories over French 240   The Germans on the whole have had five more victories than the French, and have killed 42,740 more of their antagonists than their an- tagonists have killed of them. The five extra victories, Count Von W...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE VALUE OF LAUGHTER. INCREASES THE CIRCULATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE VALUE OF LAUGHTER.   INCREASES THE CIRCULATION.   "Laugh and grow fat," is a saying as old as the   hills. It has long been an accepted fact that   humor is a promoter of digestion and merry words the deadliest foes of disease. Dr. J. E.   Kennedy, editor of the "Iowa Health Bulletin," writes an interesting article on the value of laughter, in which he shows it is not only a remedial agent, but is also a valuable preventa- tive against a host of diseases. The physical effects of laughter are thus put down by Dr. Kennedy: Laughter increases the blood circulation. It enlarges the heart. It expands the lungs. It jiggers the diaphragm. It promotes the dioculation of the spleen. In other words, laughter stirs up the vital regions of the body, gives them healthful exer- cise and produces a mental exhilaration which acts upon the system much as a brisk walk in a crisp atmosphere does upon the appetite. As strong allies to...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
General Buller's Cipher Message. EXPLANATION OF MILITARY SECRET TELEGRAMS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

General Buller's Cipher Message. EXPLANATION OF MILITARY SECRET TELEGRAMS. When sending messages in the Army it is neces- ary to use a cipher, so that unauthorised per- sons cannot read them. A keyword and letter is agreed upon by the several generals, and any- one ignorant of these two things is unable to read the message. It is not unusual to have a different keyword for each day of the month or week. The instrument used, which we illustrate, is called the "cipher wheel." It consists of an outer circle, round which the letters the alphabet are placed in the usual order; and an inner circle, having the letters in the reversed order. The disc upon which the latter are inscribed is pivoted at its centre; the arm A is fixed to this disc at any letter chosen by the generals arbitrar- ily, say A. This disc is turned round by working the millhead B. In the cipher wheel the letters of the keyword and those of the true message are taken from the outer ring, the letters of the cipher messag...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ADVANTAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

AN ADVANTAGE. "How do you like your new cook?" "Very much, indeed," answered the youth- ful housewife. "I must say she doesn't look very strong." "That's why we like her. She can't do so much damage if she gets angry."— "Washington Star."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PERILS PAST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

PERILS PAST.     Great precautions were taken by the Commo-   dore of the squadron accompanying the Royal   tourists to protect H.M.S Ophir from accident by   collision with icebergs in the North Atlantic. How necessary these precautions were may be judged by the sketch which we reproduce to-day. The correspondent who sent the pictures to the "Daily Graphic" states that during a voyage to Montreal his ship fell in with over a hundred large bergs and more than a hundred miles of   floe-ice. The majority of these were met slightly to the north of the Ophir'a track, but isolated icebergs were met as far as 290 miles east of Newfoundland. The first night of the Ophir's sail from St John's, to Diadem, which had been sent on ahead to keep a lookout, signalled "Ice- berg ahead." This was transmitted to the Ophir and Niobe, and in a few seconds the leading cruiser had turned her searchlight on the drifting mass, w...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN EXTRAORDINARY PET. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

AN EXTRAORDINARY PET. A lion as a playmate for children is a new   departure, though one or two actresses have kept such an animal as a pet. The two children in the illustration are the sons of Count Potocki, and the lion was found by the Count just after it was born at the beginning of the year on the Blue Nile, Africa, where be was on a shooting   expedition. Allowed absolute freedom, the an- mal goes about the grounds of the house quite unrestrained, living in perfect amity with the Scotch collie shown in the illustration.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY FORESHADOWED. CHINA AND EGYPT AGAIN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY FORE- SHADOWED. CHINA AND EGYPT AGAIN.   Something very similar to the telephone was     used in China 1000 years ago. Ancient Egypt     boasted the proud possession of a "penny-in-the-     slot" machine. Babylon the Great went fishing     1500 years before the Christian era with hooks   like those in use to-day, and studied the stars     through a telescope. Thimbles have been found     in prehistoric mounds with every evidence of     having been made by machinery similar to our   own. Hatpins, with glass heads, and safety-   pins, with a little coiled spring at one end and a     catch at the other, were used in Pompeii 2000     years ago.     In view of t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN UMBRELLA AND GOOD LUCK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

AN UMBRELLA AND GOOD LUCK.   Harry Conor, the comedian, well known in Aus-   tralia, is a firm believer in the umbrella as a   harbinger of good luck. On that subject he was entertaining a party at the Gilsey House, New York, with stories of a lucky umbrella given him by the late "Charley" Hoyt during the run of "A Trip to Chinatown." A long spell of stormy wea- ther had preceded the opening performance. Hoyt gave Conor the umbrella. The latter carried it constantly, and there was a continuous stretch of pleasant weather. One beautiful moonlight night he left it at the theatre and attended a supper to find it raining in torrents when he left   Delmonico's. It was the first rainstorm for two   months or more.. When Conor recovered his um-   brella it stopped raining, and not until then.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IT AIN'T CATCHING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

IT AIN'T CATCHING. That calls to mind another story about Em- mett, which has probably been applied to every prominent bowler in the world. During the progress of the same match, quite a number of catches were missed. Emmett was the principal sufferer.   Turning to Hearne, who was umpiring, Tom said, in a sarcastic tone:—"There's a bloomin' epidemic on this ground; but by heavens, it ain't catching."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ABOUT GRACE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

ABOUT GRACE. When, as a young man, W.G. had made a name for himself in the cricket world, which is a large world in England, he was playing with Clifton School against Oxford. He wasn't particularly successful with the bat.   A young freshman spread his sticks very early in the over. Grace was pressed to stay for the evening. He consented. At prayers the master in charge gave out the hymn containing a line somewhat to this effect: The scanty triumphs grace has won. Every student in the chapel seemed to put extra lung power into this particular line. "This so unnerved me," said Grace, telling the incident afterwards, "that I sneaked out, and cleared. I couldn't stand it after making a duck."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CRICKET YARNS. TRUE AND OTHERWISE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

CRICKET YARNS. TRUE AND OTHERWISE. Every big cricket match revives cricket yarns. If one attends a test match and cannot see the game, as thousands could not on Saturday last, they can at least hear yarns which your en- thusiast insists upon telling in a loud voice to   show his great—and varied knowledge. Here is   one  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PROGRESS OF MODERN SURGERY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE PROGRESS OF MODERN SURGERY. BY DR. R. ROMME, in "La Revue." That which in reality characterises modern   surgery is its tendency to progressively invade   the domain of medicine. Every day surgery   appropriates a little here, a little there, and   where we expect to see the physician we find   now the energetic surgeon. The druggists suffer   therefrom, but the sick find it an excellent   change. Take one by one the greater part of our organs and see the bistoury replace the prescrip-   tion and the plaster in a great many cases. One or two examples will suffice. A few years ago, when one had a cancer in the stomach the   physician was powerless to help the sufferer, who   gradually wasted away. To-day the physician   diagnoses a cancer of the stomach, and calls to   his assistance a surgeon, who opens the stomach and does n...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DON'T SING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

DON'T SING.   George Giffen tells a good story about Alec. Bannerman, which W.G. reproduces in his book.   An erratic, lightsome player brought upon him- self the censures of Alec, by beguiling the time between the overs in a big match by singing music-hall ditties.   "Do you know," asked Alec. Bannerman, with severity, ''that you are playing cricket? If you want to play cricket, play it, and if you want to sing, go and sing; but, for heaven's sake, don't slog comic songs in the slips.''   The story was characteristic of Alec., who, as all know, played cricket as if his dear life hung on it.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A RANJI STORY. In his "Recollections" Grace gives the following:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

A RANJI STORY. In his "Recollections" Grace gives the follow- ing:— "One of the best stories of the Indian Prince is vouched for by the Cambridge journalist who collaborated with 'Ranji' in writing his 'Jubilee Book of Cricket.' "When Ranji was at Cambridge he went on a tour with the Cassandra Cricket Club. A mem- ber of the opposing side inquired of some of the visitors if 'that dark chap could speak English?' Speedily foreseeing possibilities, they replied seri- ously that he knew a few words, such as 'yes,' and 'no,' and 'how's that?' "When the unconscious Ranji went to the wic- kets, to his great astonishment he heard some lively criticism of his batting. He made a char- acteristically huge score, and every now and then some one of the fielding side would ejaculate: 'Here, isn't it time this fellow went out?' "Once when the ball struck Ranji in the chest, and doubled him up, the fielding captain audibly hoped that it would 'knock some of the steam out of the beggar.' "At the sub...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Mark Twain. HAS A RIVAL. PAPERHANGER AND HUMORIST. MEET IN NEW YORK. AND TELL TWO STORIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Mark Twain. HAS A RIVAL PAPERHANGER AND HUMORIST. MEET IN NEW YORK.       AND TELL TWO STORIES.   Samuel L. Clemens ("Mark Twain") and Patrick   H. Coakley, a paperhanger, met one night re-   cently on the little stage of the Good Citizenship   Association of the East Side Settlement House,   Seventy-sixth Street and East River, New York.   Both were there to entertain a large audience   by telling stories. Mr. Coakley was not em-   barrassed by his distinguished rival, and Mr.   Clemens acknowledged that the paperhanger re-   ceived the lion's share of the applause. Clarence   Gordon introduced the speakers. He said, in   part:—   "We captured Mr. Clemens in the wilds of   Riverside. Mr. Coakley we caught here on the   east side. Mr. Clemens did not wa...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COALING WARSHIPS AT SEA. EXPERIMENTS AT PORTSMOUTH WITH AN AMERICAN INVENTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

COALING WARSHIPS AT SEA.   EXPERIMENTS AT PORTSMOUTH WITH AN AMERICAN INVENTION. When the Reserve Squadron has finished its   present cruise (says a recent London "Daily Telegraph") the battleship Trafalgar will carry out a series of experiments for the purpose of testing a new invention for coaling ships at sea, one of the most difficult problems in connec- tion with modern naval warfare. At the pre- sent time the means of coaling a warship, ex- cept in sheltered water or by the wharfside, are so extremely cumbersome and difficult, especially in rough weather, that it takes considerable time to ship even a small quantity of fuel, the result being that coaling at sea is only carried out during an emergency or on very rare occa- sions.   Mr. Spencer Miller, a New York engineer, has, however, invented an ingenious apparatus which overcomes this difficulty, and which is said to be capable of supplying a vessel with coal at the rate of forty tons a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A COAT WORTH £275. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

A COAT WORTH £275.   Mr. Harry Walker had a coat worth £275,   which he used to pledge regularly every week   for 2s. It was only an ordinary-looking coat,   and, of course, he had no idea of its value. When   an uncle died from whom he had happy expecta-   tions, and the will was read, he was chagrined   to learn that all that was bequeathed to him was   an old coat. He was all the more disappointed   because he was engaged to pretty Maude Han-   bury, the daughter of a Merton innkeeper. So   dejected was he that he asked the girl to release   him. Miss Hanbury would not hear of it. How-   ever, the lovers sought the advice of the inn-   keeper.   Mr. Hanbury liked young Walker, but per-     suaded the lovers to postpone thoughts of matri-   mony until...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Fortunes Found. ACCIDENTS AND INCIDENTS. WITH GOOD RESULTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Fortunes Found. ACCIDENTS AND INCIDENTS.     WITH GOOD RESULTS.       Madame Nordica, the well-known opera-singer, stumbled on a fortune of £20,000 in an extra- ordinary and unexpected manner. While touring some years ago, the famous cantatrice received a telegram bidding her come to the bedside of her dying mother. Another telegram had been des- patched to Madame Nordica's brother, but it came back unopened—he could not be found. Nor could he be found by the solicitors, who advertised in the leading papers of the world the attractive announcement that £20,000 was awaiting his claim—the half of the fortune left the two children by their mother. By a curious stipulation in the will, the fortune was not to be given up unless both children claimed it. So the fortune stood waiting for many years. At the conclusion of a concert last year in New York. Madame Nordica was being driven to her hotel, when she was alarmed by hear...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MISER'S HOARD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

A MISER'S HOARD. While employed on the renovation of an empty mansion at Linlithgow last year, the workmen discovered a large, heavy bag hidden away in the walls of one of the rooms. It was full of sove- reigns and jewellery, and worth more than £4000. The house had been untenanted for years, and it is impossible to say exactly how the money came there. However, it is known that a former ten- ant, who was of a miserly disposition, left a peculiar will. In this he stated that he knew his relatives had long wished him dead, so, to avoid any wrangling over his wealth, he had determined to bequeath it to the one who could find it. The fortune was never discovered. It is not unlikely that the find of the workmen was the hidden wealth of the eccentric old man.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BIBLICAL COUNTRIES. RECENT DISCOVERIES IN ARMENIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

BIBLICAL COUNTRIES       RECENT DISCOVERIES IN ARMENIA.       Expeditions have recently been engaged in exploring the ruins of Armenia on behalf of the German Government. The first of these was under the direction of Dr. W. Belck in 1891, and he likewise conducted a second course, in which he was assisted by Dr. C. P. Lehmann, in 1898-99. The reports of these expeditions, which are now issued, contain most important   discoveries. The history of the Armenian Kingdom is an extraordinary example of the recovery of a nation, all traces of which had been entirely lost. Similar results have taken place with re- gard to the Hittites, the people of Mittani, or Northern Mesopotamia, and the pre-Hellenic in- habitants of Crete. But the present is an age of resurrections. The restoration of the history   and the civilisation of the pre-Aryan race of   Armenia is, however, most ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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