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Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothb... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 53 items from Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WAR SACRIFICE. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

WAR SACRIFICE. Considerable sentimental interest at- tached to the auction sale of one of the gift articles sold in aid of the Auckland Hospital Ship Fund recently. This was a silver teapot which had been   taken to the auction-room earlier in the day by an elderly man as the only contribution that he and his wife were able to offer to the fund. The teapot was a wedding present, and the old couple, who described themselves as simply 'D. and K.,'. decided to part with it as an earnest of their patriot- ism. The teapot, at the first offer, was knocked down at £2 15s. 'Put it up again,' said the buyer, and the article was resold eight times, at prices varying from £1 15s. to £2 15s. 'Give it back to the old man,' exclaimed the last buyer, amidst a storm of applause, and the old couple, whilst retaining a cherished memento of the days of the past, will have the satisfaction of know- ing that theyvwere the means of adding   over £18 to the fund.

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

                                                                                                                                    &am...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
War Comforts. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

War Comforts The following is a list of some of the goods that are greatly ap- preciated by our boys at the front.   Tin Groats, egg powders, custard   powder, chocolates, tinned cheese, (milk is to heavy), soap as a large quantity is used, small tins curry baking powder, cocoa or milk and cocoa, soup tablets are better than bovril as bottles get broken, plum pudding, small tins of paste, fish etc And last but not least Tobacco.

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COUNTING THE STARS. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

COUNTING THE STARS. The number of stars visible in the largest telescopes has been variously stated. A few years ago an estimate of 125,000,000 was current. According to a recent estimate by Chapman and Melotte, there are about 219,000,000 stars brighter than the 20th magnitude. Professor Hale has recently stated that there is reason to hope that a 100-inch telescope would add nearly 100,000,000 still fainter stars, many of them lying beyond the boundary of the universe as at present known, and within a year or so such a telescope (i.e., a reflector) will probably be in use at Mount Wil- son Observatory.

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FIRST BOMB. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

THE FIRST BOMB. The bomb, once looked upon chiefly as a symbol of anarchy, has come into such general use as a destructive agent during the present war that it is in- teresting to note its origin. It came into being during the troublous times in France towards the close of the eighteenth century. Its in- ventor was a French fanatic named Chevalier, who had conceived such an intense hatred of Napoleon that he de- termined to kill him. Being employed at a Government small arms factory, he had gained some knowledge of explosives, and with this knowledge he managed to construct a bomb out of a barrel which he filled with a mixture of powder, bullets, broken glass, and white arsenic. Chevalier's idea was for the bomb to explode under Napoleon's carriage as it passed through the streets of Paris. A miscalculation, however, caused it to go off a few seconds too soon. Had Chevalier succeeded in his ob- ject the whole history of Europe would, of course, have been changed.

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A HANDY RANGE-FINDER. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

A HANDY RANGE-FINDER. This latest pocket instrument which has made its appearance has received the approval of the War Office. It is an extremely small device, comprising merely a rectangular case with the re- quisite glasses and calibration, the   whole measuring only 3in. in length, so that it will slip unobtrusively into the tunic pocket or belt. By means of this handy little instrument the distance of any object with a base of a predeter- mined length may be ascertained; it is   possible to determine, by merely one observation from a single position, the distance of an object the size and height of which is known. Also one is able to calculate accurately the dis- tance between two inaccessible points. The instrument says 'Chambers Journal,' is handy and simple to use, while its intricacies can be mastered within a very short space of time; and as facility is acquired it is possible to carry out with striking accuracy the difficult work for which it is d...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Husband For £50 [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

A Husband For £50   In the Practice Court (Vic) Mr Justice Hood granted a divorce to Heinrich Williams Varna, 49 years of age, of East Melbourne, an actor from his wife, Katherine on the grounds of desertion. Varna came originally to Australia with 'The Darling of the Gods' Company, but subsequently took a farm in South Australia. He left his wife there while he went on tour, but on his return she was absent. Subsequent- ly she wrote letters to the leading lady of the company about her hus- band as follows: 'I know you are fond of one another. I have a business proposition to make to you I will sell him to you not at his own price, because I would be independ ent for life, and you have not the money. You can have him, lock stock and barrel, for £50, as it is better for me than divorce. The petitioner stated that there was no truth in his wifes allegations. Mr. Black says the early closing rule operated unfairly at Narrabri, where there were 80 men in camp and not one dr...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Sydney Royal Show. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

SYDNEY ROYAL SHOW     The last Royal Show in Sydney was held under most inpropitious circumstances. The war scare was very severe, there was a drought almost all over Australia; and to in a sense finish with, over ten inches   of rain fell in Sydney during the   show. Despite all these disadvan- tages the R.A.S. came through the   undertaking in good style. The   show proved a financial success and it was only the rain which kept the attendance from being the largest on record. This proof of the won- derful support accorded to the Royal shows by the public in all circumstances encouraged the Council of the Society to make the   1916 show even larger than that of 1915. Prize money was not only ^fet^re(l?1to its tld foHtttigittut ^Gni siiiohvbly! increased, ^ut-'-'lw thft. jsbow.tliis yji'tar brginning on April ^ :ibtli, the t:ash .prizes w ill atnount to ovit ifTOop.,i^ ./l'..'-- ;??.? -.-?? ??...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Allies Day Fund. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

Allies Day Fund   ;' Aji^m^i^^pi^aa hw -Men. 4 onva|4edv ^},t}wpcntral * oomniii *j .-t«e'^^xa^^!^;CBiij^ibiil-te-':f6 the aiioye ffltrdi ; ?The'Tmsld^S^tji; 'tile, lo^l c^hinittejft ' has bjld the MoWfcii^ ^ .^??. -1;- ;-**7 ^..; /.? dM»tv Allies Ba- Commit^bp, JfraiiT XlO^' 'r^ ' .?;''-!t;^; ''. . [.'?'?: *'-'Jl Vr.1-. :? Dear 'Slip ;— IT ain, favored with you v letter o$f the: 4fith {\\*t eneliistif^ raised -iii fl^iiltdn cjtfl^wJlM^i ? ^IJIiesV 1-ay . jPii^d, . an piliciai ^« cdpt feift whioh. is forward1f?8^eii|t£ with. |ly oomihitt^p del%^|f^V t- conv(^v toJyj^u;aiiNBxj)rt^siojii.ji-.oir.: its uiws|| cb^ia|V,thaufcs , for ihi^ -w-*iyom|- atiiounfc -which, r^acjVeiJ my hands in dtW time -'tip par^i|v-v. bfW'^V4M*inn(*Ut suJ)i^3y ?''[wji'0» conipUti^nt« ami besi wisiiess- -- Yoiir^r^thfuJJy, Neville Mavwaai'i, Joint Hoji. Secretary. T An aiJiiouht of sori)eth|iig ? 4ike £{Jf) lias^en Jkept \i\ hand to: d»- ; frK'all expanses incurif(l;in conv ne ion ^witbr * the^^ A...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Sand Bags [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

Sand Bags During the week it was reported that sandbags were not required for         the use of our troops at the front. Later advice states that sandbags are still wanted but they are to be stored at the central depot till pre- sent stocks at the fighting base are reduced.        

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
They Say That [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

They Say That The longest way round is the surest way home. An avenue of electric lights from the main street across the subdiv- ision to the railway station is bad- ly needed. One resident strayed from the narrow path (of the subdivision) at the week end, and for thirty long weary minutes, tramped the   wilds of the new suburb looking for the railway station.   Upon arrival at the station it was proved that time and trains wait for no man. Whenever we are free from our necessary business and cares, then we long tc see, to hear, and to learn something new.   It is not a bad plan to wear a soldier's overcoat, especially if the night be chilly after the fun of the fair. The partings at the garden gate are very hard, but dad dispels all romance when he appears on the scene. There seems to be some myster- ious attraction (for young ladies) at the post office. This is especi- ally noticeable when it is an on off day for the 'boss.' It is bad enough ...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRESENTATION. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

PRESENTATION (From a Correspondent) On Wednesday Feb 23rd a social was tendered Privates L. G. Part- ridge, D. E. Thrift and J. Reeves, at the residence of M. D. Thrift. Mr. F. Pankhurst explained the object of the gathering, and said it gave him great pleasure to be pre- sent at such a function, and trusted the boys would return home safe and well, and if they should do so a right royal welcome awaited them. Mr. Hart then presented to Pri- vates Partridge and Thrift a wrist- let watch. Private Reeves was unable to be present, and a wristlet watch and wallet were handed Mr. F. Pankhurst to be forwarded to   him. Each recipient suitably re- turned thanks for the presents, Mr. Pankhurst doing the same for Pri- vate Reeves.                     Mr. A. S. Pankhurst in a few   words eulogised the boys for their patriotism, and hoped th...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

At Richmond, in the Cumberland district           is a public house on one side of the river   that is in County Cork, and is thus excempt from 8 o'clock closing, and there-       fore the other side have to observe the new regulation.

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Plum Pudding Without Suet. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

Plum Pudding Without Suet. Ingredients :— ½lb. of flour, ½lb. of breadcrumbs, 1lb. of butter, l½lbs. of   raisins, ¾lb. of currants, 1lb. of sul- tanas, ½lb. of candied peel, 1lb. of caster sugar, the peel (chopped), and juice of 1 lemon, 1 teaspoonful of mixed spice, 4 eggs, and a few drops of essence of almonds. Beat the butter to a cream, then add the eggs, well-   beaten; and afterwards add, gradually,   the other ingredients. Boil the pud- ding in a greased basin for eight hours.

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BLESSING THE SWORDS. Women Forbidden to Make Them. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

BLESSING THE SWORDS. Women Forbidden to Make Them. That the Japanese are past-masters in the art of sword-making is proved by the splendid weapons, equal to those of Toledo and Damascus, which they turnout. The actual methods of sword- making in Japan are jealously guarded, an extraordinary feature of the industry being the religious ceremony which ac- companies every process of their manu- facture. The walls of every sword- making shop in Japan will be found to be covered with allegorical representa- tions of the sword-makers and the chief goddess of the Shintos.   Evil spirits are kept away by charms   consisting of bits of paper and wisps of straw, while should any woman enter the shop disaster would certainly come to the swords that are being made and to their wielders. Consequently women are absolutely debarred from entering business as sword-makers, while not only is prayer offered up before the work begins, but various religious   rites,...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NAPOLEON'S WAY. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

NAPOLEON'S WAY. The introduction of the modern sys-   tem of compulsory service followed as a necessary consequence of the era of war- fare into which the French Revolution plunged all Europe in 1792 (writes Col. Maude in the 'Star'). Until Napoleon took the whole' matter in hand, how- ever, it seems that no one even distantly discerned where this policy of a fixed annual contingent of men would ulti- mately lead them. But it gave Napo- leon a firm foundation on to to build up the whole policy of aggression, which he subsequently pursued. As he said himself to a frightened Austrian Am- bassador, 'I alone in Europe can afford to spend 30,000 men a month,' and it was this certainty of being able to draw against his country for specified num- bers, year in, year out, which gave him his great advantage over all his op- ponents. In the end, all Europe was compelled to follow his lead, with the result that for the last half-century it has been an armed camp, in which forces w...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PIGEONS AS POSTMEN. Trained in the French Army. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

PIGEONS AS POSTMEN. Trained in the French Army.   From the earliest times recorded in history the homing pigeon's wonderful faculty of 'getting home in a hurry' has been utilised in conveying messages. In the days of the Pharaohs navigators sailing to Egypt released pigeons with messages to let the people know they were coming home. In the seventh cen- tury the Arabs maintained a pigeon- post. Pigeons also rendered valuable services to the Dutch at the siege of Leyden in 1574. The siege of Paris during the Franco- Prussian War fully established the value of the homing pigeon as a mes- senger. During the siege 74 balloons ascended, carrying pigeons to Tours and other points. It was estimated that 800 pigeons were sent from the pro-   vinces to Paris during the siege, and that the total number of messages car- ried by these winged messengers would make a library of 500 volumes. So successful was the pigeon-post that Bis- marck established a pigeon-loft in Ber...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STANHOPE. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

STANHOPE (From our Correspondent) On Tueaday evening Private Leslie Tay- lor, who was on final leave, was entertained by his friends at the Pubic School and pre- -♦?uted with a utifoty rni »r. Tbrre wa« a arj-e Katliering of r«*idetttBt every family io in the locality bring reprvMnted, aud vifi , t6i« wtre pr««niit f«»pi all parta --f jhe «ut-« niuuditijf digkrict. . Vhw \itmw/' H. U.»ba?t j- lUTuHjBdf com B*-H»-3Ct-n lo fconorthft if«^»f Mr. \VJ. A, Benduigji, who «m'«i! J»» f.ft pleaned to be presrht to honor ibi-ir mntnal - friwtd.f»ri»|nVTiJyJ^ They all had «»..?» him go ldnj{,t(Vku.»w'iii« worth an a ?oldwr wid a man; U« had in»t him Ou^fae 'iM'Dit' ciort atid ou the «rjoket^eid, and *-.?# tfc {.rowans t,her*«t jeo he wus^qre to do ItkrJii * in the firing line or wheret^r he wm pUi:eii. Ue Wmi pruad to wee hiui ..fferin* himaulf fojp 4iiB King and oonntrr.' and faoptld f.e woaM return »»fely to lii« hi-me auii fatuity. On , behalf cf tlie floiumittee he asked.^ vMie»v G«»Han to...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Village Fair. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

Village Fair The Village Fair, promoted by the ladies . of the local Red Cross Society (which had     been postponed from the 12th inst.) was held at East Branxton on Saturday last. The attendance was very large, and the pro- ceeds, added to the amounts obtained from   the disposal of various article will amount to over £21. Everything was up to-date, the place being beautifully decorated with bunting. The highest praise is due to the committee for the way in which everything was carried out. It would not be out of place at the present time to say that there is no patriotic body that has worked so un- tiringly in the interest of our soldier boys than that of the Branxton Red Cross Soc-   iety, and as the whole of the work has fell     upon a comparative few, we would impress upon our readers, that more workers for the Society are urgently needed. Mrs. Maffey of Singleton, acted as judge for the. Baby show ...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ARTILLERY OF OLD. [Newspaper Article] — The Branxton Advocate: Greta and Rothbury Recorder — 4 March 1916

ARTILLERY OF OLD. Even the big 5½in. howitzers of the   old days would have been pathetically helpless against an assault of 1915 in- fantry, but they were deadly enough then in all conscience, as also were   the 12-pounder field guns. The very first shot fired by the German battery at Waterloo killed 17 Frenchmen. One round shot from a French cannon killed Captain Fisher, of the 40th Regiment, and 25 of his men, ripping up an en- tire line in its fell course. Marshal Ney's famous concentrated batteries of 74 guns, which, on other fields had taken the heart out of many a promis- ing enemy, opened suspiciously at   Waterloo by sending the Dutch and Belgian troops scampering panic-   stricken through the lines of the British Grenadiers, who could only with diffi-   culty be persuaded from turning round   and firing on the runaways. But many scores of men were shot by their own side that terrible day, nor was...

Publication Title: Branxton Advocate: Greta And Rothbury Recorder, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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