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Elephind.com contains 4,114 items from Direct Action, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

NOTICE. ... Mr. SHEARSBV will Lecture on Astronomy in the I.W.W. HALL, 330 Castlercagh Street, on Saiur day, March 7, at 8 p.m. He will show the operation of the Solar System by means of two marvellous machines culled Orrery .-nid Tellu rian. All arc invited to ntlend. Th;-sc who want to miss a treat kindy stay away. '- 'HOW CAPITAL HAS HYPNOTISED SOCIETY' By WILLIAM THURSTON BROWN. (To be Continued in Next Issu'V U navt idably Crowded 0 : t 1

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SYDNEY LOCAL. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

SYDNEY LOCAL. During the last few weeks our meetings have been very well at tended. On Sunday, the 8th, a demonstration was held in the Do main to protest against the deporta tion of our fellow-workers from South Africa. A great crowd 1. ston- ed attentively, and a thousand cop ies 01 our paper ^ uirect jvcuon j were sold. On Sunday, the 15th, an exceptionally big meeting was held. Many strikers ' were among the audience, and they listened at tentively to our speakers, who pointed out the futility of the star vation strike, and the necessity for sabotage, or, in other words, how to go on strike, and remain at work at the same time. Our meetings at Bathurst-street continue to become larger, and many are waiting for th message of industrial unionism long Jjefpre our speakers commence then addresses. On Friday, 13th, a fine meeting was held at Newtown, and the sales of 'Direct- Action' were very good. At the Trades Hail, on Wednesday, 4th, at least a thousand 'slaves' gathered round ou...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Broken Hill [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Broken Hill I — . - I Local No. 3 of the Industrial I Workers of the World are right I here in the city of heat and dust, focarrying on the propaganda of the I ^-W.W., as they have been doing |l|for the past 15 months. We hold jflrneetings every Sunday evening at fefhc corner of Chloride and Argent I Streets, and the meetings are al E-::=ways attended by a good crowa 01 l£pwage-workers who are anxious 10 iifhear of a better form of organisa §f tionlhan exists on the Barrier to pi day. Our sales of literature arc rAgood. and by the distribution of % ^literature we have secured several f ^applications for membership. Since Uthe Local was formed in B.H., a \ Jlarge number have taken out cards I ';- ioi membership, and these are not t fmerely dues-paying members, as ft weTiave in the craft organisations, W: but fellow-workers who take an in W;- tefest in the affairs of the organi W. sation and attend the economic ©classes held weekly, doing their ut H' most to become acquainted with || ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Open Letter MR. O'BRIEN, SECRETARY OF THE TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCIL. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Open Letter MR. O'BRIEN, SECRETARY OF THE TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCIL. Sir, — When you were but a mere vice-president of that intellectual body known as the Trades and La bour Council, then the speeches of your late chief, Mr. Fox were ridi culed by the industrial unionist, but when they were doing so they were continually reminded that his days, as president were numbered, and that when you would take hold of the reins of office all criticism from the 'rebels' would have to cease. We were assured that you were really an intellectual, being conver sant with aH the economists of re pute, and that you had made an es OPEN LETTER pecial study of the laws* operating under capitalism, as expounded by Man himself. If you had remem bered the old proverb, 'A still ton gue maketh a wise head,' perhaps even now some of the slaves wouid be looking to you as a real, eman cipator, but when you made your maiden speech as president, you Im mediately made yourself ridiculous to all industrial unionist...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

INTENDING - MEMBERS DESIROUS OP JOINING SYDNEY LOCAL CAN DO SO BY NOTIFYING SECRETARY TREASURER, F. A RAISON. t?*Mffrsq -n^nai Jip ' ' i

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

I The Labor Struggle is Primarily and Essentially a Struggle for I; Industrial Control. Industrial Unionism, therefore is the First and I only Requisite.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Reports [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Reports L^*,V:'.'; A debate was held outside the 'Deadhouse' (Trades Hall), be tvreen Mr. Price, d' trade unionist, and fellow worker C. Reeves, of the l.W.W'7. Mr. Price affirmed that the l.W.W. principles and me thods were no g»od to the worker. Mr. Price was first to put his views, In which he pointed out that there was abotit 4000 megnbers in his union, and yet at business meet ings hardly 60 attended ; that was one of the reasons why the workers wages are so small to-day. The workers were constantly fighting amoHgst themselves, instead of di recting their activities towards their unions. Continuing, lie said he couldn't possibly agree with the I.W.W., because they abuse all trade unions, and they were not scientific in their organisation, therefore he considered they were wrong. In concluding, he stated they had no principles, and there tore a general strike under such an organisation would be a complete failure and disastrous for the work er. Fellow-worker Reeves implied, and ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Late New Zealand Strike. It's Lesson. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

-54 The Late New Zealand Strike, fe (By C.T.R.) It's Lesson. | To understand the late New Zca ,'.' land strike and the events leading '?; up to it, one hns to review the lab f.{ our movement of that country for the past few years. \; When the Ward Government f held office a Bill was passed known as the Compulsory Medical Ex amination of Miners' Bill,' which was in its essence an insidious at tempt of the coal and gold Barons to shield them from the provisions [ of the Employers' Compensation A-1, in other words, a clumsy ef fort to put into operation a syste matic plan of victimising any miner of revolutionary principles. The miners refused to work under such a Bill, and Semple, asy their mouthpiece, interviewed the then Premier (Mr. Ward), and forced the politicians to recognise the Economic Power in the miners hands, wth the result that the Act wa.s repealed. That victory was the birth pang of the Miners' Fede . ration, which ultimately evolved in | to the New Zealand federation o...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Direct Action [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Direct Action — ♦ — 'Direct actien' means getting at your boss directly, ? through your union. It is usually contrast ed with 'parliamentary -action,' which aims at getting laws passed 'in tlie interests 01 laDour oy some politician. The direct actieH ists want.- 'laws' relating to hours of toil, wages, safety appli ances, sanitary regulations, etc., made and enforced directly by the workers in the slv.ps, In disputes of this ITind between the workers and the boss, the most usual form of direct action is the STRIivli. It may be an active strike, in which the workers leave ihc shop, form picket lines, and endeavour to bring the boss to terms by slop ping production for the time being. The aim in this case must be to tie up the shop mid all ofhor shops of the same industry completely, every worker being off ihe job- Or it may be a 'passive strike,' where the workers do not leave the shop, but stay on the job, working more slowly and carefully, and thus delaying production and increasi...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Mutineer or Striker. Where We Are Heading For. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Mutineer or Striker* Where We Are Heading For. ihere are times when the mem bers of Hie National -Association of Manufacturers open their hearts to one another, or the congressmen or .senators, or governors or -judges they are about to bribe, and tell them what they think about you and me and other working men and women. ' Henry R. Towne, president of Clf Yale and Toiwne Munufaclur-. ing Company has such infamous ideas of the way the workers ought to be treated that we want to lay bare his heart for your 'in- spection. When Browning spoke v{ his bclo'.cd Italy-, .you nuiy re ?meniber lliai he said, 'When 1 am .'dead, open my heart and you will find thereon written, in letters of tioJd, Italy.' Wei 1 , we have ''had a peep into Mr. 'iowncs private correspondence with James .\. Emery, general counsel lor Uic N'.A.Al-, and we have found, ..i ins heart, written in letters oi brass, the one word, l^RUFlT^. This is a sample ui the labour millennium for which the capitalist class and their...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

lireGtiGtion Iff ^'^'^4 iSi MONTHLY ORGAN ' Of the INDUSTRIAL WORKERS OF THE WORLD. (Australian Administration). Office:— 330 CastSereagh St., Sydney Australia. ''''' EDITOR— THOS. CLYNN. MANAGER— E. A. GIFFNEY. Matter for publication only shau'.A bs addressed to the Editor. Other matter to the Manager, Subscription, 2/- per year. Special Terms on Buntiie Orders. HEADQUARTERS I.W.VV. (Ausiraiia): 330 CAS7LEREACH ST., SYDNEY. GENERAL HEADQUARTERS— 164 W. Washington St., Chicago, !i!., U.S.A .

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PROPAGANDA. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

PROPAGANDA. ? 4 ? concerned. If industrial solidarity is fo be eventually achieved, It can only b« done by the propagation of sound principles in form, aim and tactics, combined' with the lessons which the masters are hourly teach ?fr.|. ing the crait organisations. *§?'. The writer is aware that it is W&V easier to give advice than to follow «P it, but however that may be, the .-?£'\j first requisite for success in propa H'l ganda as in other matters, is a Hh& clear understanding of what is need m-M .

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Stock Literature We have the following literature In \^ stock:— -^ *Nl '-}' ?i-w —?..*. if ,; ,_. ? + ? ''?: 3ne Big Union, An Outline of a Pos sible industrial Organisation of the , \ Working Class, with chart. By E. . ?_- ?« A. Trautman. Price 6d. ? *, The Rights to lie Lazy, Not the right ;: to work, but more of the things f t that work creates with leisure to . -\ enjoy them, that is what intelli- . g gent wage workers demand. By r&j8- Paul Lafargue. , Price 6d. ^ /Jfg On the Firing Line, Report of th»pj «_ Seventh Annual convention, on twtf ^ M McNamara Case, Ettor and Ciov J3j annitti Case, The Lawrance Strike, ~jv# And what Is the I.W.W. Price 3d. 'l!j The I.W.W It's History, Structure, j^j and Methods By Vicent St. John. gg Price 3d. ? Jwf The Revolutionary I.W.W. By C. H. J|f Perry. Price 3d. Ssf — W Eleven Blind Leaders, or Practical Soc ? J| ialism and Revolutionary Tactics, .&& By B. H. Williams. Price 3d. |j| ? _ ? -?;% Direct Action versus Legis...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Propaganda [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Propaganda From all sides there are queries Mm concerning the One Big Union and ra| what' is meapt thereby. It must be Wj admitted that a great deal of our If out-door propaganda is devoted to S side-issfies which have no direct w bearing on forms of organisation, m industrial or otherwise; so mucn El so, -indeed, that it is not infrequent «'fl ♦n lipar n niip.tLtion nskpri n-; tr- tilt* lH remedy at the conclusion of, per- ]f jfjll; haps, an otherwise excellent ad- ' ijivv ----- ; '- BssSV dress, in which the speaker has laid :§jf|; bare the workings of the capitalist -J'f||ff system and its tendency to crush' ^ . .: 4lf 5 and exploit the worker. While uU|- §||?3f phases of tbc class struggle, sirnpl«:p & S or complex, whether they find ex- \\ '''H.-J pression in religious, social, indus-: V. fc ;ft trial or political activity, arc of in- -f ? J terest to the industrial unionist, \ 'M ^ most of us are liable to forget that | % %. we ourselves went through an evolu- . ^fey, ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Short Arm Jolts. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Short Arm Jolts. 'Mr. Holman, Premier of New South Wales,' says a recent ca ble from Wellington, 'arrived by the Manuka, and was entertained by Mr. Massey and other Ministers at luncheon.' A. — ; — r ? ? . ? Premier Massey, of New Zea land, is the capitalist tool by whose agency the recent strike in New Zealand was broken, and on the very dale that Mr. Holman waved with Massey and his lieutenants, workers were being tried and sen tenced in the New Zealand courts for 'sedition' and co-called crimes against capitaJist society. There is an old saying about 'Birds of a feather,'1 etc. It may he a co-incidence, but the same cable informs us that Mr. Holman allowed himself to be in terviewed for the purpose of ex jressing his disapproval of strikes in general and the general strike iii particular. Mr. Holman informs us that six years ago 'the I.W.W., an Ame rican organisation devoted to the general strike, was making much headway in Australia,' but now, according !o this working-cFass ?-c...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Why Living is Dear [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Why Living is Dear ? a. ? In a recent issue of the 'Sun,'' observer raised the question of 'Why Living is Dear?' but utterly failed in his attempt to demonstrate why prices are rising. In order to understand lite causes of a rise or fall in prices we must first of all understand the function of money ana me laws oi excising.? value. In rV? first pl.ic:\ : ? 'Vjv became an e; (jiiomic neccs.v.r. during the epoch in which the individual pro ducer could no longer gratify his ywn desires with his own labour; in other words, during the transi tory stage* from individual to social production. Division of labour is a necessary condition of social pro duction, and of an increased pro ductivity of labour. In the first stages of this epoch articles of util ity were exchanged for articles of utility, the us.es of .'.which were ex pressed by their bodily form. But so long as one article was exchang ed directly for another they remain ed non-commensurable; they both existed in relative forms. Fo...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Somewhat Personal [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

Somewhat Personal This paper is written by slaves for slaves. So long as we arc un derstood by the workers, we do not care whether or not critics criticise, friends approve, or enemies revel in denunciation. Grammar, orthography, punctua tion, etc-, are things that we heard of :il school in the dim and remote past. We only heard about them. Economic need, or in other words, the master's voice, became impera tive, and the years which should be given to study were devoted to manual toil in the service of those fortunate people whom God or dained to place over us. And the 'ennobling Influence of labour' r has not yd, apparently, accomplished its task. We are still 'uncultur- ed 'uncouth,' and ungramma tical. We drop our h's in conversation, our composition is faulty, and our punctuation abominable, 'but fellow slaves will, nevertheless, under ? stand our message. This is not meant to be an apology. It is merely a roundabout, but we hope a polite, method of telling would-be critics lo g...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Preamble [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

? '' * The Preamble * — ♦ — The working clasa and the em ploying class have nothing in com mon. There can be no peace so long as hunger and want are found among millions of working people, and the few who make up the employing class have all the good things of life. Between 'these two classes a - struggle must go on until the work ers of the world organise aa a class, take possession of the earth and the ( machinery of production, and abol- ( ish the wage system. We find that the centering of the management of industries into few er and fewer hands makes the tracTe unions unable to cope with the ever growing (power of the employing i class. The trade unions foster a : i^ ? state of affairs which allows one set of workers to be pitted against an other set of workers in the same in dustry, thereoy Helping to defeat one another in wage wars. More over, the trade ^unions aid the em ploying class to mislead the workers into the belief that Hie working class have interests in common with ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Vampire. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

The Vampire. By Bert Leach. With Apologies to Kipling. A fool there was and he cast his vote (Even as you and I) For ragged pants and a tattered v coat, And some grub on which he didn't dote He voted for G.O.P., you'll note, Oh, the work we do for the fav oured few, And the miserable wage we get. We crack the nuts and they take the meat, They hand us chaff and they take the wheat. And to make our bondage more complete, We vote for this system yet. A fool there was and he goods had none, (Even as you and 1) He worked like 'ell from sun to sun, He got no cash so he worked for fun, And he voted just as his dad had done, (Even as you and I) Oh, he worked like fun from sun to sun, And he plotted and schemed and planned, But he just could not make both ends meet, If his head kept warm then he froze his feet, And his kids hadn't half enough lo eat, But he couldn't understand. The fool was stripped to his fool ish hide, (Even as you and I) They couldn't use that tho' they may have tried, An...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 28 February 1914

- AN . Explanation* 4 ? T- — — The author of the pamphlet, 'How Captitalism Has Hypnotised Society,' a first instalment of which appeared in our last issue, is Wil liam Thurston Brown, to whom we apologise for inadvertently omitting t, his name. In our opinion the pamphlet is one of the best in revolutionary literature, and should be in the hands of every wage-slave. * Sixpence in stamps to I.W.W. headquarters, Sydney, will secure it.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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