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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,990 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

CORRESPONDENCE. CLASS POLITICS. —A SUGGESTION. MR. SPECTATOR ; AT the beginning of a new college year, I would most respectfully ask your indulgence for a few remarks on what seems to me to be a very important matter. From your first number I learn that you are opposed to all "class politics" at Columbia. Not only does this position of yours meet my hearty approval, but I also think that sufficient emphasis has not yet been given to the great injury which this evil inflicts on our undergraduates. In fact, by " class politics alone, Columbia has become a school of political trickery and cunning, and the young men entering here are taught that " smartness " is the road to honor and esteem. What, sir, can be more unfair than the bartering away, by some Freshmen, representatives of different parties, of all offices in the class, determining in advance who shall be the most popular man in the Junior year, and who is best qualified for Valedictorian ? The evil is so manifest, that I will ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
LAW DEPARTMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

LAW DEPARTMENT. NOTICE.—THE SPECTATOR is the recognized organ of Columbia Law School. As such, though laboring under the difficulties of a beginning, it will regularly endeavor to collect in these columns all matters of interest to the students, and in return hopes and solicits, as a special condition of success, their earnest support. Regular reports of the Moot Courts, and of cases cited, decisions, the Law Clubs, Reviews of new Law books and news items, will be published. Special arrangements have been made to insure punctual publication and delivery of each number. Items and articles are solicited from all students. Communications should be addressed to Mr. J. Fischer, 8 Great Jones Street, New York. IN assigning to the Law School as such, a special department in our paper, we deem it advisable lest our intention be misinterpreted to state a few of the facts which impelled the Board of Editors to this step. The basis on which the SPECTATOR is founded makes it advisable, in order...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Letters. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

Letters. To the Editors of the Spectator. NEW YORK, Sept. 15, 1877. GENTLEMEN - AS a member of the Law School, I naturally take a deep interest in all that relates to her welfare, and therefore avail myself of your cordial invitation to trespass on your valuable space with a few remarks. There are in existence at the Law School two Clubs, named the Barnard and Columbia, the object of which is to enable the members of the School to enjoy among' themselves the advantages of public debate and the trial ol Moot Court cases. The great benefit to be derived from well-contested debates and re-argument of the cases which form the subject of the Moot Courts, is too apparent to require further comment. In spite of this, I have seen with sorrow that only a few members of the Law School avail themselves of the chances offered them by these means, and have noticed a want of interest in these exercises which is inexplicable to me. True, the Law Clubs can boast of many members, but only a small pe...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Literary Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

Literary Notes. THE ANNOTATED POCKET CODE. Albany, John D. Parsons, Jr. —1877. Of the numerous " pocket " editions of the new Code of Civil Procedure this is beyond doubt the best and most complete, albeit the most expensive. We have here not only the standard text as deposited in the office of the Secretary of State by the Revision Commissioners, but also notes and references to decisions bearing on the code, together with the Temporay act, the Suspension act, the Repealing act and the unrepealed sections of the former code. The type is clear and very distinct, the paper of good quality, and, though the volume contains 719 pages it is of a much more convenient size than any other edition. A further advantage which Mr. Parsons' neat volume possesses, besides the notes and good typography, is the tastelul and durable binding in flexible morocco leatherettee, instead of cloth. As we must now all have the new code, and as it will for some time bea pocket vade mecum for every lawyer and...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

THE LIBRARY. DURING the summer, general dullness prevailed, as usual, among the world of books. Publishers and authors are entitled to a vacation as well as others, and no doubt they will amply make up for lost time during the winter. The most notable literary enterprise of the summer is the Vest-Pocket Series , already repeatedly noticed, and which at this writing has probably reached a hundred volumes. That there is demand for this kind of pocket literature is certainly a most encouraging sign of popular taste. These volumes, which for outward beauty are unexcelled contain a most judicious selection of the best shorter literary gems in the language, by such writers as Longfellow, Lowell, Hawthorne, Emerson, Howells, Pope, Shakespeare, Byron, Shelley, Tennyson, Coleridge, Holmes, Cowper, Goethe, Schiller, Owen Meredith, Gray, Campbell, Aytoun, Whittier, Burns, Thomson, Ivlacaulay, Carlyle, and others of like fame. Most of the volumes contain each one well-rounded work of its author...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

OUR EXCHANGES. THE June and July Acta closes the most successful volume in the history of our sister organ. The reference made to the first number of the SPECTATOR is very cordial and hence exceedingly gratifying to ourselves, the more so, in fact, since the first editorial notice of the new paper led us to expect quite a different welcome. We rejoice, however, for many reasons, that there seems to be no reasonable prospect of anything but literary rivalry between Columbia's publications. This is as it should be. Cordial goodwill and mutual, fiee but sincere criticism can very well be combined, and we assure both our readers and our friends of the Acta , that they shall be combined as much as possible in the columns of the SPECTATOR. In other respects, the summer Acta is hardly up to the usual standard. This may especially be said of the two editorials on the Class of '77 and on Commencement, both of which are in very questionable taste. The Acta can hardly be sincere in calling the...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

ABOUT COLLEGE. WELCOME TO ALL. Glad to see you are back. How, and where did you spend the vacation? Now for three months of solid work. How will the new stairway to the library suit when full of ice and snow in winter? NOT the slightest improvement in the cloak room. THE new and commodious office of THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR gives general satisfaction. Come and see us, but don't stay too long. THE seniors will be expected to write and deliver a speech to Prof. Nairne every month. In consequence, it seems probable that brass will be a drug in the market this winter. THE beautiful painting in the chapel still disturbs general devotion. The gentleman in pink should be removed in the interests of Christianity. THE freshmen should early learn to obey the law which prescribes that they are to pay for all foot-balls used during the season. The class being large, the expense will fall very slightly on each individual. INTEREST in class-politics centers chiefly on the troubles in '7B. A general...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SCHOOL OF MINES DEPARTMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

SCHOOL OF MINES DEPARTMENT. WE regret to announce the decease of Henry Newton, A. 8., E. M., Ph. D., '69, formerly Assistant in Geology. Dr. Newton died West, during the summer, while prosecuting his investigations among the Black Hills. DR. H. C. BOLTON, late Assistant in Quant. Analysis, has been elected Scoville Professor of Chemistry and Natural Science at Trinity College, Hartford. "Nature" for August 2d, 1877, contains an interesting letter by Dr. Newberry on the cretaceous llora of the West. It will be remembered that Dr. Newberry was the first to point out the fact that the lignites of the West were cretaceous. In this he is sustained by all prominent American Geologists who have investigated the subject. But it seems to be a very hard fact for foreign Geologists to accept. DURING the first week in September, Dr. Joy was in town and paid a visit to the S. of M. We are glad to state that he has fully recovered from his recent illness. MR. J. W. DAVIS of '7B has a second editi...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

THE COLLEGE WORLD. FOR three months the colleges of the country have been deserted, and of course, there is as yet no college news of moment to record. From what, however is heard of the beginnings already made, it seems that the present will be a most successful year everywhere, notwithstanding the hard times. With our next, we hope to resume our regular chronicle of collegiate affairs, and hence bid our readers patience for another fortnight. In the future we hope to make this department of THE SPECTATOR of value and interest to our readers. General College News. WILLIAMS students now pitch pennies instead of quoits. THE University of Virginia has twenty fraternities. OBERLIN COLLEGE, Ohio, has received a gift of fifteen thousand dollars. THE Class of '77 of Bates College received from their Commencement Concert $1,732.25 ; and, after the payment of the entire Commencement expenses, had a balance of five hundred dollars, which was equally divided among the members of the Class. Si...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 October 1877

SHAVINGS. AT the marriage of an Alabama widower one of the servants was asked if his master would take a bridal tour. " Dunno, sah ; when ole missis's alive he tuk a paddle to 'er; dunno if he take a bridle to de new one or not." A ST. LOUIS school boy gave his teacher this illustrative definition of "responsibility:" "Boys has two buttons for their spenders, so's to keep their pants up. When one button comes off, why there is a good deal of responsibility on the other button." AN AMERICAN platform lecturer -solemnly said one evening before his auditors: "Parents, you have children, or if not, your daughters may have." A GERMAN recently exclaimed : " Mine wife is det ! If she had live till nex Friday she had been det two weeks !" PREPARATIONS are being actively made for the resumption of fall studies at the various large Universities. Entire new sets of bats and balls throughout have been provided at Yale, and Flarvard is reported to have ordered a large consignment of euchre decks ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, OCTOBER 15th, 1877. No. 2. Board of Editors, 1877-78. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief., J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. C. H. CROW, '7B. H. G. PAINE, '79- W - B - PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00 Single copies, - - - - - - 1 5 c t s - Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, New York.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

CURRENT TOPICS. WE make room with pleasure, for an abstract of the last valuable Report of President Barnard. As this document will probably be printed in a limited number only, and thus have little or no circulation among our readers, we count upon the indulgence, if not the gratitude of the latter, for reprinting such portions of it as may be of general interest. We also express our thanks to Dr. Barnard, for his very kind permission to use the Report, which certainly will only heighten the esteem in which he is held, not only by all students and friends of Columbia, but by educators in the whole country. THE Trustees intend, we hear, to sever the connection which, heretofore has existed between Columbia College and the College of Physicians and Surgeons, — generally called the Columbia School of Medicine. According to the resolutions passed June 4th, iB6O, it was resolved that the connection should continue during the pleasure of the respective Boards of Trustees of the two Colle...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A Good Beginning. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

A Good Beginning. THE one hundred and twenty-fourth college year of Columbia opened October ist, under auspices as encouraging as the most enthusiastic and sanguine friend of the college could have hoped or desired. As President Barnard said very truly in his admirable opening address : " Columbia will show the world that, in her rusty shell she has an interior unsurpassed anywhere for vigor or soundness." New life seems to ha e returned where all seemed stagnation, and the college may be said to have all facilities for which there is at present any room. Great improvement can be noticed in the course of studies. The Sophomore class is now taught History of English Literature by Prof. Alexander, the new adjunct of Prof. Nairne, though Roman history seems to be falling somewhat into neglect. " Bojesen," however, still annoys this class, and we are surprised that among all the improvements this " relic of Antiquities " is still left untouched. The Sophomores also enjoy the lectures of...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
PRESIDENT BARNARD'S REPORT. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

PRESIDENT BARNARD'S REPORT. THE Annual Report to the Board of Trustees is before us. As it undoubtedly will be of interest to our readers, we give below such extracts from the document as are best suited for publication. Passing over the introductory remarks, as well as those on attendance and discipline, matters which are well known to our readers, the following statistical information, will be of interest: For the year ending in June, 1877, there have been deduced from the record the following results tor the class about to graduate: Senior Class. —Average Scholarship. Proportion above 90 per cent. - - 1 to 13. Proportion between 80 and 90 per cent. - 2to 7. Proportion between 70 and 80 per cent. - 2to 7. Average, —74, 79. And for the half year ending in February, 1877, the following: Junior Class. —Average Scholarship. Proportion above 90, - - - - 1 to 8. " between 80 and 90, - - - 2to 7. " 70 and 80, - - Ito 4. of entire class above 70, - - 3to 3. Sophomore Class.—Average Schola...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

CORRESPONDENCE. FOOT-BALL MATCHES. Mr. Spectator:— Could no arrangement be made by the managers of the Foot-Ball Club, to insure excursion rates of fare for students attending the match games at Princeton, New Brunswick or New Haven ? In the case of New Haven, for instance, the fare both ways is $4, but if at least forty tickets were purchased they would cost but $2.40 each. Including the eleven, I have no doubt that forty students could be found, willing to attend the games at such favorable rates, and this could not only increase the enjoyment, but would also awaken new interest in outsiders. If it is not too late, I would urgently suggest to the Foot-Ball managers, some such arrangement as the one indicated. Very truly yours, G.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE MARKING SYSTEM. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

THE MARKING SYSTEM. " Stealing and cunning, if not discovered, were highly rewarded in the youth, as fitting them to cope with wary foes in time of war."—(Grecian Antiquities). THIS would seem to indicate that there was a marking system in the Grecian schools. The Trojan Horse is now supposed to have been the design of Grecian students, and it was described by an eyewitness as closely resembling a pony. Like as the Greeks of old ponied their way into Troy, so do we nowadays pony our way through the siege of Troy. The world has made several mistakes from trying to imitate such a nation. For instance: the Greeks were trained to deceive in war, we are trained to deceive in time of peace, in political matters, finally in that great blessing, education. The Romans had some required studies. In the school where Juvenal went when he was a boy pupils were required to learn by heart several pages of Cato. Juvenal, therefore, took some nice olive oil and smeared his eyes, and was then excused...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE HARLEM REGATTA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

THE HARLEM REGATTA. THE first annual autumn regatta of the Association, open to all amateur comers, was held on the Harlem with great success on the 2d of October. There were 38 competitors, representing the following clubs : Columbia College, Atalanta, Athletic, Dauntless, Nautilus, Nassau, and Grammercy of the Harlem ; besides the Friendship, Seawanhaka, Palisade, Nonpareil, Empire, Yale College, Argonauta, Wesleyan College, Arlington, Yonkers, Woolvenhooks, and Triton clubs. The racing was divided between the morning and afternoon, beginning at 9 A. M. MORNING RACES. These were rowed down stream over the mile course, starting at McComb's Dam. Junior sculls. Trial heats. First heat. Emil Conlon, Friendship ; J.J. Gunther, and \V. S. Wilson, Gramercy ; W. Content, Columbia College ; and J. V. Elliot, Seawanhaka. Conlon, though pressed by Content for a quarter of a mile, won in 6m. 32j^s.; Wilson second. Second heat. W. Hurley, Friendship; J. Frazier, Palisade ; W. R. Kent, Nonparei...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
In Memoriam. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

In Memoriam. AT a special meeting of the Delta Chapter of the Delta Phi Fraternity, held at their rooms on the 2nd day of October, 1877, the following resolutions were adopted:— WHEREAS, we learn with regret of the death of our brother Rev. WM. A. MCVICAR, D.D., of the class of 1846, Columbia College; THEREFORE, be it Resolved; That by his death we have lost a brother whose high and noble character has endeared him to the memory of all who knew him ; and whose continued interest in the welfare of the fraternity entitled him to its most sincere respect. Resolved; That we members of this chapter wear the usual badge of mourning for the space of thirty days. Resolved; That a copy of these resolutions be published in the college and daily papers, and be.enrolled in the records of the chapter. Louis M. CHEESMAN, ) WM. E. WYATT, > Com. BACHE MCE. WHITLOCK. )

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

THE LIBRARY. A STUDENT'S EDITION OF BACON'S WORKS. THE publication of a new, popular and inexpensive edition of the works of Francis Bacon is, for all students of philosophy and literature, an important event. The works of the second of that great trio of Englishmen, Shakespeare, Bacon, and Newton are neglected altogether too much by the present generation of students. It would be beating air to enlarge upon the merit and importance of Bacon as a philosopher, or to point out the magnificent results of his system of philosophy. As Lord Macaulay tersely sums up the latter, (Essays, Vol. 1., p. 389) : " It (Bacon's philosophy) has lengthened life; it has mitigated pain; it has extinguished diseases; it has increased the fertility of the soil; it has given new securities to the mariner ; it has furnished new arms to the warrior ; it has spanned great rivers and estuaries with bridges of form unknown to our fathers; it has guided the thunderbolt innocuously from heaven to earth ; it has ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 October 1877

OUR EXCHANGES. The Deutsche Rundschau is now universally accepted as the leading review of Continental Europe. Under the efficient management of Dr. Julius Rodenberg this periodical has rapidly surpassed all other German periodicals, and even the Revue de Deux Mondes, in interest and permanent value, till it now undisputably stands on an equal footing with the great English reviews. No one at all interested in the development of modern European thought should fail to read this Review with attention. We are pleased to see the Rundschau among our exchanges, and hope frequently to return to it in these columns. All German importers of the city fill orders for the Review. The Princetonian has a number of letters on college subjects, among which we see one dated June 21st, 1920. This probably represents the feeling between the Freshmen and Sophomores to be such as the Faculty earnestly desire. It would seem to indicate pretty nearly the wishes of our Faculty, if we rely upon the Presiden...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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