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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

The Indian Advocate Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. V. APRIL 1893. No. 2. Among the Osages. We get word from the present pastor of the Osages Rev. D. Lancelot, 0. S. B., that the occasion of the pastoral visit of our dear and venerated Bishop was quite a red letter day for the Osages. How heartily those, who have been first to labor in that part of our vast missionary field, will rejoice ! It will gladden their hearts when they hear that the seed they have sown under such seem ingly unauspicious circumstances, has at. last been ripened and promises a plentiful harvest. Indeed, if we except the Pottawatomies, there is not an In dian tribe whoro more zealous and dis interested work has been lavished for the last seven years ; which fact how over seems to have been little appre ciated at times by casual observers. A rapid glance at the eventful and check ered fortunes of the Catholic mission on the Osage reservation will bear us out in this, and may prove of interest ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

22 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. by a certain Methodist outfit, and every effort was made to discourage the re building of the mission. A temporary residence was secured for the Sisters, the priest had to be satisfied with board ing at a tavern or begging his meals from place to place, and Mass was celebrated on Sunday in the Council -House of the Indians. To show their appreciation of the good work done by their missionaries and the good Sisters, the Osages, on the day following the fire, had voted sixty thousand dollars to be appropriated out of their own money, for the rebuilding of the mission, and they had set aside one hundred and sixty acres of land for the same purpose. The appropriation of money was never approved in Wash ington ; so we had to turn somewhere else for help. It came again from the generous Miss Drexel. She furnished the plans of a new school-house to be built out of stone, upon a much larger scale than the first, and to cost $18,000. It took some time to get over the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. S3 torod Confirmation, and delivered so lucid an exposition of Catholic faith on that Sacrament, that six more adults asked to be instructed and prepared for its recoption at the next pastoral visit. FACTS. From Beyond. One day in lovely summer I cast my self beside a babbling stream and wandered in fancy through many a fair and lordly land. My thoughts turned often to the rolling prairies, dark majes tic forests of America before the groat Colon, sow its shores. I saw the stal wart forms of my famed ancestors pass toward the glowing western sky. I longed the- spectres of fancy might speak, but one by one like figures of a lone night's dream, I saw them fade in nether air. How long this waking vision remained I know not, but pres ently I seemed borne aloft, carried south ward to the Red River's bank, and the cycle of time turned backward half a century. I lost my my identity and became as another being. The mellow light of an October sunset glanced over lordly f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The wild unrhymed chant censed. I saw the kindled eye the swelling bosom then burst in thrilling tone from him the following. "To die! Ilnl not so! I swear it shall not be!" His voice changed and in beseeching voice, "Manitow, the Mighty, thou hast made me guardian of thy people, in this their neediest hour I call for aid. Even now I see the boats laboring up the river with my exiled race. Groat spirit, cast thy mantle over them! Give them courage to carve their future destiny." "Aha!" his voice became high and resonant with courage and exalted pur pose, "I will yet foil the plans of those who seek to trample us. "Hear me ye forests, ye vales, ye hills, ye rivers, register a vow unto the High one, that my people shall yet be a na tion of highest honor, her seat shall be beside the mighty of the land. Her sons and daughters shall bend the bow with the learned of other races. Aye, I shall rest not until she shall have achieved deathless fame. My eye shall watch ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 25 My people ye have risen in power Now God be thanked for this glorious hour Bright and smiling are thy homes Bravo and learned are thy sons, My people ! My people ! God be praised ! His voice rang out sweet and clear, the notes floated long on the air, which seemed loth to part their joyous com pany. The twilight seemed filled with the sweetest music. The spirit passed from sight, but a faint inexplicable feel ing made mo yet know his near presence. I lingered until night had fully taken the place of her fairer sister, then turn ing I sought the house. Not many steps had I taken when I heard a burst of grandest music, it was as if a nation poured forth her thanks, in glorious tone I heard, "Now God be praised, all honor is Thine, Thy people render thanks for gracious Mercy." The night wind caught the strain and poured it forth again, the still earth resounded jubilantly. Since that time ever and anon in the quiet watches of the autumn nights I have heard the f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

26 TRfi INDIAN ADVOCATE. , rabbit, the squirrel and the dog are the principal animal gods. Each spirit of good or evil has its distinct and appropriate place of resi dence. The rabbit is declared to live in the broomsage on the hillside, the fish dwells in the bend of the river under the pendant hemlock branches, the ter rapin resides in the great pond in the west and the whirlwind abides in the leafy tree tops. Each disease animal, when driven away from its prey by some more powerful creature, endeavors to find shelter in its accustomed haunt. It must be understood that tho animals of the formulas are not tho ordinary every days animals, but their mighty progenitors, who live in the upper world above the arch of the firmament. Until recently tho formulas of the Cherokees were kept very secret by the priest-physicians or "medicine men," being the most important part of their stock in trade. They are doubtless of great antiquity, and were handed down oralty from generation to generat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 7 My eyes woro opened and my mind enlightened to understand tno Script ures. I thought of those words which I had lately uttered in vain " How beautiful are the feet of those evangel izing peace evangelizing good tilings." I thought my feet never looked so beau tiful, so swiftly did they carry me out of Egypt. The perverse and unbelieving gener ation! Their punishment has already commenced. They boar upon them the seal of their final condemnation. The Gospel shall be taken from them and shall be given to the Indians the poor benighted aborigines of tho land. -So from thence I traveled as far as Purcell, in the Indian Territory, and having made some inquiries about the tribes, as to whether they were good soil for the seed of the Word, and particularly as to whether they were savage or gen tle, and, being told they were harmless, I felt my zeal and courage renewed. Being informed that a Mission had been already established about forty miles from Purcell by the Be...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

28 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "You sleep a the voely veol?" said ho. "Well, not very well," said I; for he was so good, I hated to tell him a lie. I asked him to kindly send mo one of the Fathers who could speak English, and they all seemed to speak it freely. "Oh," said he, "me no understand English; me speak a the Basque." Exit, the Brother; enter, the Father. After the conventional exchange of courtesies, I ventured to ask him for an explanation of the alarm-bell and the mysterious noise, and he said with a smile: "Oh, that was the monks chanting 'Matins and Lauds,' which they rise every night at one o'clock to recite. I hope it did not disturb you." "Well, not much," I replied. The explanation seemed satisfactory so far, but next night, not later than 8 p. m., I heard a more terrible noise evidently a number of them were whip ping some real or supposed offender. Making inquiries also about this the following morning, I was told it was the taking of the Discipline. "What is that?" I as...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 29 " Rich and rnro were the gems ho wore." "You will see him after a little while, and if you interrogate him, or are a close- observer of human nature, will observe that his yoke is sweet and his burden light." Micro are different branches of this ancient and historic order of Benedic tines, but this is the only one in which the original rule of the illustrious founder is observed to (he letter. With the other observances of this peculiar mode of life I am not suffi ciently acquainted, and though I were, I have not sufficient time to refer to them. Suffice it to say that the day is divided up into a series of duties, with the strictest economy. Some are teach ing, some walking about in deep medi tation, or kneeling in silent prayer be fore the altar, some working in the fields, some at various trades, some many miles away in the active work of the mission, but all always occupied, and reflecting in their faces, withal, that spirit of peace which reigns unbroken...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

so THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. fli Tje Indian Advocate Is n Review, published by tho Denedictinc Fathers of the Indinn Territory, to plead tho cause of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of tlulr progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. Tho proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians, of the Territory. TIIK INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Ofllce, Oklahoma Territory. Approved by Right Rev. TIIEO. MKKRSCHAKRT, Vicar Apostolic or Oklahoma and Indian Teiuutohv. 1 : Subscriptions HO Ccitv per Ycttr. Sinylc Copies 15 Cents. APRIL 1893. Edito.fial and Local. New Year's 'day 1893 will long be remembered by those who had the pleasure 0 witnessing the impressive cere...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. SI the Sisters placed in charge of his paro chial school. A fair was held as the first step to attain that end. It was to have been held in the court house, and was rented by the parish priest for that purpose, but an arch-enemy was at work. Being an enemy from without, he could not very casiljr "sow cockle among the tares," but he did all he could outside the "field" to spoil the good under taking. He or, rather, they secured, in an underhand way, the use of the court house for themselves on the very night on which it was to have been used for the Catholic fair. Of course they used the building for a charitable purpose also, they say; but one form of charity should not, nor can be pro moted at the expense of another; the interests of charity recognize no dis tinction as to person, class or creed, it is essentially one and indivisible un changeable like even to Him from whom it cometh and for whom it work eth. St. Paul says, "Charity thinketh not evil, and seeke...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

88 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the carriage drove in front of the spa cions building and the Right Rev. Bishop alighted. In the meantime the little Indian girls assembled, and after the song of welcome four little girls advanced and addressed the Bishop, reminding him that it was the little ones who welcomed him with which he was very much pleased, and after giv ing the blessing and telling them that they were the little children of the Infant Jesus they returned to their frolics. During the next two days the Right Rev. Bishop visited the Indians in their tepees, and announced that he would preach to them on the following Sunday, in the chapel of St. Patrick's Mission. .The Indians who had met him be"fore and many others promised to be present at the services. On Sun day morning, although the weather was very cold, the poor Indians in their bright blankets could be seen coming towards the mission. At 10:30 the High Mass was sung by the Rev. Father Isidore, 0. S. B., and after the gospel Hi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

T&fi INDIAN ADVOCAVfi. 33 The good Bishop intends to tako a trip to Europe soon, which wo hope will be a pleasant and safe one, for indeed all who have ever come in con tact with him will surely regret his absence. Pottawatomies and Politics. The Citizen Band of Pottawatomies abandoned their tribal relationship while the tribe resided in Kansas, pre vious to the year 1867. As a natural result the great majority who remained in Kansas, many years after understood all about voting, while some of them became shrewd and adept politicians. I But the portion who had been living in the Territory since 1872, in conse quence of their present environments, and in accordance with the laws con firming and reinstating them to their former status of allegiance, had for the first time in many years the opportun ity at the recent election of county and territorial officers, to exercise the rights and privileges of their naturalized as well as of free-born American citizen ship. Both of tho pred...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

n TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Democrats wero regardless of their vote in insulting the Indian race by placing the "bust of an ugly Indian" at the head of their ticket. The intelligent majority of tho Citi zen Band of Pottawatomies, however, paid no attention to the savage-featured device; they would as soon have voted under the picture of the devil St. Mi chael hurled from heaven, provided tho candidates underneath were loyal re presentatives of the principles they had lojigince desired reinstated. ' They have too good a memory to adhere too long with the devotees of the "handsome Indian," they remem ber too well the tradition concerning "the great father" under former Demo cratic administrations; they still re member the good treaties made with Uncle Sam, and how the honest father of those times used to carry out every stipulation with promptness to the let ter. They also remember that since the Republican party got into power the days and the years were not so fruit ful of prosperity to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. SB department baflled, as it eould not under any authority of law remove the Pottawatomie "boomers," nor their families. But the department always took sweet revenge, whenever it had the tribe at its mercy. No part of the treaty of 1SG8 that was favorable to the tribe was over carried out, whilst the department always in sisted upon the fulfillment of all such portions of its articles as wore advan tageous to the government. In fact, the overbearing policy of the Republi can department towards the tribe was so great that notwithstanding a school fund of $5000 per year to their credit, one generation of the Pottawatomie youth were deprived of a school edu cation, on the pretext that they were citizens of the United States, and that the Pottawatomies must support and maintain their own schools by their own efforts, the same as the White men.j And still the Indian agents oTthc Government, at the time of their an nual reports to the Commissioner of In dian Affairs, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

36 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. want thoir school located. Aftor the Hon. Commissioner received the letter ho sent out a special agent, who, after making a bigoted and malicious report of the Sacred Heart Mission and its Faculty, selected the government land near the Shawneetown Mission as being the proper place for the Pottawatomie School.! Thus will the injustice of the Repub lican department bo readily seen. First the department was anxious and was successful in her scheme of making the great majority of the tribe reside south of Little River, and now, in a later day, the recent department disregards the wishes of a General Council by sending a special agent to select a location not their own, far off from their homes, to the north of Little River. These, with many other facts too nu merous to relate, are the reasons why the intelligent portion and the greater portion of the Pottawatomies voted the Democratic ticket, which resulted in the victory of the entire county ticket, and in Benja...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

38 v THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. is a crypt, the most ancient portion of the existing edifice. In the south transept are seen the upper part of the clock and the celebrated Angel Column, a beautiful example of thirteenth cen tury sculpture. The clock was completed in four 3roars by Horr Schwilguo. to replace the one constructed in 1570, which had been itself proceeded by the clock of Bishop Berthold. The maker of the first clock, according to the legend, was blinded by his fellow - townsmen lost he should construct a similar work for some other city. The second clock was designed by Conrad Dasypodias, Professor of Math ematics at Strasbourg, in conjunction with the Brothers Holbrecht, mechani cians of SchafFhousen. The decorations of the case were due to the painter Tobias Stimmer, a native of the same town. This clock stopped in 1789, and in 1S38 Ilerr Schwilgue undertook the task of restoration. The mechanical part of his work is completely new, and far superior to that of his prede cess...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. SO physic into his mouth; but the moment ho was released he turned the whole dose with great vehemence into the face of Father Isidore. The old chief was mad, but even his savage nature could take in the humor of the situation as Father Isidore fell to work cleaning his own medicine out of his eyes. Ho gave way to uproarious laughter, and his 300 pounds of avoirdupois fairly shook his tepoo off his willow poles. He felt somewhat relieved after his hearty laugh, and the addition of a hot bath given, and said he did not need any more medicine. The disease that is carrying him away is probably cancer of the bowels, aided by congestion. Ho is very old, and the chances are that before the flowers bloom again the old chief, White Horse, will be at rest. Little Things. " Mule drops of water, little grains ot sand, Makes the mighty ocean and the wondrous laud." Little deeds of kindness, charitably given, Hear for those who give them, golden steps to heaven Little works ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1893

4-0 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. tye jXijgel of jpiirgatory. HOW MANY 8WKE7 RKMINI8CEKCKS THIS TIT1.K ItKCAUS TO A CHHI8TIAN MIND. HOLY WATER. A (UtHAT RESOURCE FOR THE POOR SOULS. The use of Holy Water, accompanied by faith and confidence, procures won derful effects to body and soul; and is very beneficial for the souls in Purga tory. Whenever a priest blesses the water, he does it as a substitute, and in the name of the Church, whoso prayer the Divine Savior readily deigns to hear; for whomsoever the Holy Church may pray. Hence, whenever we take Holy Water, and with but one drop of same bless ourselves, or any other object, present or absent, the prayer of the Church from anew penetrates the clouds, finds its way to the foot-stool of God, and obtains graces and blessing for body and soul, for every object that is touched by the Blessed Water. It also lays low the power of the evil spirits, whence the saying: "Ho fears this or that, as satan does Holy Water." Mil lions of facts can be add...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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