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Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

side the state. In both sections almost the entire amount of cheese consumed is produced beyond the state lines. Putting these facts together, what is the conclusion? Simply that Washing ton needs cow breeders; needs cows; needs milkers; needs butter and cheese makers; and, goodness knows, she needs the money that now goes to eastern dairy men, dealers and shippers, and to trans portation companies for hauling the east ern product. The talk about creameries—private, co-operative and corporate—is not half loud enough yet. Dairying may be put down as one of the solid, everyday, every-3-ear interests—a standard industry that always brings wealth to a commun ity. It takes nothing from the farm that it doe 3 not repay with interest. It is a corner stone of the structure Prosperity. AN EXHIBIT AT SPOKANE. Secretary Tonneson informs The Ranch that Governor McGraw will attend the Spokane convention. An invitation to at tend has been extended to all the members of the last legislature, and i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

6 NOW BUY SHEEP. I'rof. Thomas Shaw, of the Minnesota Agricultural College, was asked by the Northwestern Agriculturist what would become of the sheep industry under free wool? Is there a possibility of raising sheep for mutton at a profit? What is net-ret for feeding ofmutton? He replied : 1. The price of wool has a bearing upon the profits of sheep husbandry, yet, if wool were put upon the free list tomorrow, sheep would be raised at a profit, if raised in a judicious way. 2. There is a glorious possibility of making a handsome profit from raising sheep even now, when so many farmers are evidently looking for a short cut to send all their sheep to the shambles in the quickest possible manner. I would that I could persuade the farmers of Min nesota, all of them, to invest in breeding ewes at this very moment, providing they have none on their farms at the present time. 8. The secret of feeding for mutton is, first to have good common ewes and good pure bred rams of any of the dark ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

ORCHARD AND GARDEN NOTES. The apple locally known .is the Spieey Sweet is pronounced by good judges to be the Fameuae. Whitman is a good name for a good apple. We have not seen it, but the state horticul tural society recommenda it as worthy of further trial. It was first called Pine Tree Seedling and also Rawle'a Seedling. George Reudy, of Colfax, will propagate and intro duce the Whitman. The Ranch learns that Capt. Thomas' orchard, southeast of North Yakima, is about cleared of noxious insects. The San Joso scale was quite numerous there last year. The salt, sulphur and lime remedy was used. Perseverance a little longer will end the pests. Good work. The inspectors rpport other orchards in Yakima county that have not fared so well. Time now to get after the pests with pumps and solution. See note from Secretary Tunneson. Secretary Tonneson to The Ranch: This month every infested fruit tree in the state should be carefully washed. Let us get the lime, sulphur and salt and begin sp...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

s THE RANCH A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It. Price— a year, in advance. Worth—Two gold dollars. Conducted by E. H. Libby. Managing Editor, W. W. Corbett. EDITORIAL OFFICES: NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. BUSINESS OFFICES: North Yakimn, cor. Seeoud and Chestnut Sts. Seattle, lloom 7, Hiuckley Block. Tacoma. 11W, Pacific Aveuue. RANCH SMALL TALK. How many of your neighbors have you asked to subscribe for The Ranch? The Ranch is growing like a west coast fir tree, or like eastern Washington alfalfa. Watch it grow—and give it a boost, it you think it worthy. Now is time to think about the weeds. They are easy to kill at the right time; veri table monsters of destruction if you let them get the start of you. It is a pregnant fact that may develop great results, that our payments for sugar abroad about equal our income from foreign sales of wheat and flour. A herd of dairy cows furnish a home mar ket for beets, parsnips, and some ©f the other root crops, and a home market for the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

BEET SUGAR RECORDS. Practical Pointers From Practical Points. The Lehi, Utah, beet sugar factory reports for 1893, a sugar product of 3,877,110 lbs. It ran about 100 days, closing on December 26. It used 26,800 tons of beets, consumed 4,675 tons of coal, 1,700 tons of lime rock, 7,328 bushels of coke, 38.000 double sugar bags. Ihe beets were harvested fnm 2,700 acres of land, by over 800 growers. In the fields 3,000 people were employed ou the crop; 150 in the factory; 1,017 cars of boets were received by rail, making » total of cars used for beets, coal, sugar, etc., of 1,500. It has taken three years to get beets enough to run the factory; now the farmers are all anxious to grow beets at $3.75 per tou. AT NEBRASKA STATION. The Nebraska state station has been Cirrying on elaborate experiments in sugar beet culture and its bulletins upon the sub ject are of considerable interest just now. The conditions there, however, are quite different from those surrounding this part of the coun...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

(it THE SHIPPING ASSOCIATIONS. A. C. Fry, the well known Seattle pro duce depler, tells The Ranch that he most heartily approves of the proposed Yakl- BM shipping associations. And will do all lie can to forward their objects. Some of his suggestions will interest The Ranch reakers and be of direct benefit in organization of the associations. All of the Sound markets depend on the Yakiina country for melons, said Mr. Fry. Last year the uncertain and irregular ship ments demoralized the trade and made lost to all concerned, where handsome profits might as well have been the result. "In one case in particular, I tried to break the glut here by sending a car load of inel ms to Olympia. I lost, personally, $18 in cash on that car, besides the total loss of the shipment to the grower. The cause was that a full car reached Olym pia from some other party the day before, and that was all the market could stand. Under a system of central control, all such overstocking and loss may be pre ven...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

POULTRY RANCH. [Our Poultry Editor is Ilnrry 11. Collier, No. QM C St.. Tacoina. Address him on nil Poultry matters.! Incubators. Nothing speaks more definitely of tjio advance in the poultry commerce thaa the increasing uso of incubators. These ma chines at first were looked apon ill a dtlu sion and a snare to cheat the biddies out of their honors and the gracn horn out of his money. But today, by practical test, they have proven as g.>od hatchers as th; best of hens and because they have done away with awaiting the pleasure of the old heus to Hit, they are a long way ahead of the old mode of incubating. At the late Seattle poultry show an in cubator hatched 93 chicks from lOOe^s. If it coi Id be done at the show it can be done elsewhere find with the improved brooders all that id required to have a good hatch is a, first class machine and fertile efigs. Under tluse conditions we can have broilers any or every month in the year in the coldest climate. The incubator has many adva...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

I 2 TIME AND THE ROSE. The rose til the garden slipped her bud, And the laughed In the pride of her youthful blood, As she thought of the gardener standing by— "He is old—so old! And he soon must die!" The full rose waxed in the warm June air, And she spread and spread till her heart lay bare; And she laughed once more as she heard his tread '•He is old now! He will soon be dead But the breeze of the morning blew, and found That the leaves of the blown rose strewed the ground; And be came at noon, that gardener old, And he raked them softly under the mold. And I wove the thing to a random rhyme, For the rose is Beauty, the gardener Time. —Austin Dobson. Employment. Adam exchanged his paradise for plowing; Eve made up millinery with fig leaves. The earliest knowledge from the tree so know in-, As far as I know, that the church receives; And since that time it ueed not cost much showing That many of the ills o'er which man grieves, And still more women, spring from not employ ing some...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

THE HUMMING WIRES. Vuu have all heard the humming and sing ing of telegraph and telephone wires as you passecl the poles along the streets. Xo doubt you have concluded that this is caused l>> the action of wind on the wires and given it no further thought. Hut it is not true that the singing is caused by the wiud, and if you are at all observing you will notice that often the humming sound is to be heard on cod winter mornings when the emoke troni chimneys goes straight up until it in loit in the clouds and when the frost on the wires is as fuzzy an i thick ;n a roll of chen ille fringe. The wind lin nothing to do with the sound, and according to an Austrian scientist, the vibrations arc due to tiie ohiuge3 of atmospheric temperature, and especially through the action of cold, as a lowering of temperature induces a shortening of the wires extending over the whole of the conductor. A considerable Amount of fric tion is produced on the supporting bells, thus producing sound* bot...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

M SUBORDINATING SELF. The theme of all the great tragedies is the collision of the individual will with some law, necessity, or institution higher or stronger thau itself. It is the adjustment of the individual to institutions; to envirou raent, to the conditions of his life, which determine* success or failure. The man who sees clearly what ho can do, and docs it with all his heart without waiting for butter tools or postponing lu3 work for bet ter material, masters the adverse forces of life an I baeomns himself a conquering power. The man, on the other hand, who KQtkjjoniiaa the institutions or the forces about him, and cares more for the accom* plUbment of his own will than for the carrying out of the large designs and wider pnrp ises of society, wrecks himself and becomes the victim of those powers which lie is not able to master; for, in dealing with human life, as with nature, mastery comes by yielding. There are conditions, of course, which demand the absolute antag onism of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

BORROWED. Owner Unknown. Never wash rasins that are to bo ustd in B\veet dishes: It will make the pudding or cake heayv, Spirits of aintnooia, if diluted, applied with a sponge to faded or discolored spots in a carpet will often restore the color. To make brooms last longer than they ordiuarly do, dip thorn once a week in boiling suds. This toughens the strands. If ink is spattered on woodwork it may he taken out bj- scouring with sand and water and a little ammonia; then rinse with woda water. For erysipelas, apply with a soft feather to the discolored surfaces equal parts of sweet oil and lime water well shaken to gether. This has been fouud a prompt relief and an unfailing remedy. The object of beating eggs, as well as cake, is to fill them with air; this done they are at the acme of lightness. More beat ing breaks the air cells, distributes it un evenly, liberates some and destroys its per fection of frothintss. Salt water is strengthening to the eyes, and will not hurt them. If...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 10 February 1894

16 Prosser Falls Irrigated Lands. Ist There is, cm account of the great growth of the country tributary to Prosser Falls, a demand for a distributing point. It is the outfitting point for the great Suunyside country, that is now being irrigated by the X. P. Co., of which Paul Schulze is president. This canal Is 00 miles long, of which 42 miles are now completed. This canal is 30 feet wide on the bottom and carries 680 cubic feet of water per second of time. When fully com pleted it will irrigate 70,000 acres of laud. 2d. Prosser Falls is the starting point of the great Yakima and Columbia system of canals that will irrigate 7;>,000 acres, throwing open to settlement a magnificent country. This canal is partially completed and work is being done at the present time. iftnni. M nn Km ,iMt..hwi ML Prosser Falls is the outfitting point for the great Horse Heaven w heat district, comprising 400,000 acres, of which only 10,000 are now cultivated, buUater w^m suppo^rt^manM Nort hern Paci...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in 'The New West. VOL. I. NO. 5. Prospects. A big DON'T is frequently of as mucl. value as DO. Tho don't on the svga beet business for the Yakima valley uttered by Prof. Fulmer last Saturday will be of great value and importance to thi3 region, if taken with the big But with which Prof. Fulmer accompanied it. Don't plant a big acreage this year, nor until you are sure that all of the condi tions are right for a successful issue of the campaign. But do plant an experi mental plot, a hundred or more of them, one on every farm in tho valley, from the special seeds that will be furnished gratis by the agricultural collpge, and cultivate under the same system laid down by Prof. Fulmer. Then send specimen beets to him for analysis, all free of charge. On the results thus secured, and only thus, will it be safe to enter upon the in dustry. The terms are so liberal and easy, and as the beets nre good stock feed, the Yak...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

2 proud to own. Let us build it wisely on the eternal foundations of truth, virtue and justice. Ex-President Bucey, of A\? state horti cultural society, promises that the Jane meeting of that society shall be held in North Yakinia if assurance is given that a good attendance is certain. It he had seen the enthusiastic meeting of the Yakima county society last week he would have had no doubt of a turnout on the greater occasion. Come on with the June meeting. We will Rive you an audience of 300 to 500 intelligent, inter ested people. With the active co opera tion of the Commercial club with the horticulturists, Tut: Ranch is perfectly safe in this assurance. In auother column will be found ex tracts from a letter written by Judge J. R. Lewis, who hardly needs an introduc tion to our people. He was for several years chief justice of the territory of Washington, is a man of wide experi ence, and a heavy taxpayer in this county. He is better known here as one of the incorporators of the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

He hand Us cattle by the thousand yearly —now has 1,400 head on a Washington range. He had made a deal of money at the business in years gone by and had lost a heap in the last two years. But he was not discouraged and didn't lay his ill luck to the Republican tariff kite or to the Democratic scuttle fish. He just kept his temper and his courage and said he'd stick to the tails of his bulls and co vp till they drew him out of the financial mire or perish in the "draw," as many a good stockman has done before. That's the kind of a roos ter that I'd like to have for a neighbor, and I wish his ranch was next to mine. He gives a fellow courage and hope, and these are the things most of us need in these low down financial times. But I believe I'd better get off the perch for a while and let your other readers have a chance to shout. Perhaps you'll hear from me asruin npxt week. W. L. JONES, J- M. NEWMAN, Notary Public. Notary Public. JONES & NEWMAN, ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Rooms 4 and 5 ov...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

4 A GOOD ROADS WAR. The telegraph tells us of an Ohio man who proposes a new crusa le to march on Washington. He proposes to iuo 100 of his own horses in the crusade, so evidently it will be a fine outing for the peaceable crusaders. They deserve success. Colonel Pope ought to join in this. Say, Colonel, why not contribute the loan of 100 bi'iyles? Mr Cox, the arch crusader says: "There will be 100,000 of us. We shall reach Washington on May 1, when we will hold o grand meeting on the steps of the capital to demand in the name of the sov ereigu people the passage of the good roads bill and extension of the right of municipalities to issue non-interest bearing bonds and secure notes thereon. We shall depend upon the outpouring of the down trodden people to sustain us in our mis sion for the salvation of the republic. No man will be premitted to carry firearms of any description. We want neither anarch ists nor communists. Let thi3 civilization that has created the communists and an a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

ican Cranberries." He accordingly noti fied the dealers that they would be prose cuted if they persisted in selling an in ferior article, and they finally stopped, and substituted the genuine American article. During Mr. Ryder's visit to Europe he disposed of 5,000 crates of berries at re munerative prices, where no profit was expected, and where only 500 crates each year had previously supplied the demand. Mr. Ryder says that the work of intro ducing the fruit abroad has but just be gun, and that a similar work must be followed up each year. CARE IN TREE PLANTING. Principles are the same the world over. The experience of Edwin Hoyt, a noted Connecticut fruit grower, as told before the Massachusets Horticultural society is timely talk for his northwest brother hereabouts. We quote: It is the duty of the planter to co-oper ate with nature, which stiongly tends to preserve the life of new planted trees by means of the sap stored in trunks and limbs. This furnishes the supply for the f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

6 THE INTERVIEWER. D. E. Lesh on a 20-acre Ranch — Cost of Beginning and What Is Required—The Winter Apple Orchard the Mainstay. The Cow, the Pig and the Alfalfa. Small Fruits, Vegetables, Etc—Culti vating the Orchard — Irrigating—Hop Growing- A Whole Lot of Hints for the Tenderfoot and Others—Advice of an Enterprising Man 16 Years on the Yak- Ima. Thia week I pressed that old timer, D. E. Leah into service for the benefit of new comers especially, though many of the hints will be worth dollars to those already established on the small ranch. Lighting a fragrant Yakima, the Coionel seated himself in a comfortable chair ready for the infliction. Now Mr. Lesh, said the interviewer, I am supposed to personate a tenderfoot with toes swollen with chilblains fresh from a Dakota winter. I have bargained for a 20-acre ranch "under a ditch." I have made my first payment and have a little money left. How shall I make a beginning and make it right? How much cash have you remaining? promptly sp...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

ELEVEN-COW POWER. Here is a good dairy record and oti« worthy a place in every cow owner's vote book. The dairy is ownad at Howell, Or., and consists of eleven cows. Of course it will be understood that the whole number were not being milked nil the time. By months the butter yield was is follows: January, 1893, 230 pounds; February, 242; March, 228; April, 336; May, 307; June, 365; July, 327; August, 290; September, 327; October, 259; November, 218; Decem ber, 255 pounds. Here is a total of 3,472 pounds—an average of 315 aud a fraction per cow. Dining the summer $29 worth of cream was sold. The skimmed milk was fed to pigs. The butter was sold on yearly contract at 30 cents per pound, giving a re turn of a little over $94.50 per cow. The owner is a believer in high feeding, and he put into each cow fully $78 worth of feed and care. Had he given the returns from the pig feeding the report would have been more complete and satisfactory. The pigs must have brought in sufficient to pay...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

8 THE RANCH A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It. Price—sl.oo a year, in advance. Wobth—Two gold dollars. Conducted by E. 11. Libby. Managing Editor, \V. W. Cokbett. EDITOIMA.L OFFICES: NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. BUSINESS OFFICES! North Yakima, cor. Second and Chestnut BU. Seattle, Room 7. Hinekley Block. Taeoma. 111R, Pacific Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. Fast walkers, not fast trotters, are the horses for most farmers to breed—great strong fellows that can draw nplow or a loaded wagon with sturdy ease and gracs. Florida 3trawberrie3 were selling at 40 to 50 cent 9 per quart on February 1, a\ Chi cago. That is rather a low rate for this time of the year, but times are dull there and even the rich are economizing. Spokane begins the curing of bacon and bams, on a scale sufficient to supply the local demand. That' 3 a goed move. Now if the wheat farmers will supply the pack ers witli home grown pigs, a little home trade will be established that will prove profitable all around. C...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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